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BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 



ENGLAND, 



FROM EGBERT THE GREAT TO THE REVOLUTION. 



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BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 
ENGLAND, 

jFrom ISgfiert ti»c iffircat to ttje ttrtiolution: 



CHARACTERS DISPOSED IN DIFFERENT CLASSES, 
METHODICAL CATALOGUE OF ENGRAVED BRITISH HEADS) 

3 SYSTEM, AND 



A VARIETY OF ANECDOTES, 

MEMOIRS OF A GREAT NUMBER OF PERSONS, 
WITH A PREFACE, 



BY THE REV. J. GRANGER, 



FIFTH EDITION, 

IN SIX VOLUMES: 

VOL. IV. 
LONDON: 

PRINTED FOR WILLIAM BAYNES AND SON, 



AND SOLD B' 



COBS HILL; J. PARKER, OIK _ __ 

H. S. BAYNES AND CO. EDINBURGH i 



1824. 



v. i 



Printed by J. F. Dan, St. John') Square. 

redbyGOOglC 



BIOGRAPHICAL 
HISTORY OF ENGLAND. 



THE INTERREGNUM CONTINUED. 



OFFICERS OF THE ARMY AND NAVY. 

General Fairfax, holding the head of 

Charles I. by the hair, in his right hand' and an axe 
\n his left. The print, which seems to be Dutch, is in- 
scribed " Carnifex Regis Angliee;" 8vo. 

OLIVER CROMWELL, &c. lieutenant-general. 
Joost Hartgers exc. 8w?. 

Oliverius Cromwell, exercituum Anglican rei- 
publicae generalis locum-tenens, gubernator Hibemue, 
fyc. P. Aubrey ; 4to. - 

Oliverids Cromwell, vice-generalis. Heads of 
Charles I. 8$c. 4(o. 

LIEUTENANT-GENERAL FLEETWOOD was the chief of 
the fourteen major-generals appointed by Cromwell over England 
and Wales. These men, most of whom were obscure persons, 

TOt. iv. B 

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2 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

were armed with an inquisitorial power over the royalists of tfl 
oVnarnj nations. Their principal' business was to search oat sad 
examine snch as had borne arms for Charles I. or were disaffected ' 
in the present government ; and to punish them by imprisonment, 
dVcimation of their estates, &c. See Class II. 

'LIEUTENANT-GENERAL* LAMBERT. Walter 
p. floubraken sc. In the collection of the late Earl of 
Bradford. , Jtiust . Head. 

Major-generalLambebt; h.sh.mezz.-{J?.Place.) , 

\. , 
The Honourable Major-genera l Lambert ; oval; 
large Ato. slashed sleeves; looking to the left. 

Major-general Lambert; in armour; cravat, $c. 

John Lambert, &c. in armour; looking to the right: 
style of Garwood ; oval. 

Major-general Lambert distinguished himself by his valour and 
conduct on many occasions, during the civil war; particularly at 
the battle of Naieby, at the battle of Fife, in Scotland, and by his 
JaAnj, victory in Cheshire, where he totally defeated the forces com- 
* manded by Sir George Booth : for which important- service the 
parliament presented him with 1000/. to buy a jewel. He was, of 
all the officers of the army, the second to Cromwell, in courage, 
prudence, and capacity ; but was equal to him only in ambition. 
The Protector regarded hira with a jealous eye; and, upon his re- 
fusal to take the oath to be faithful to his government, deprived 
, him of his commission, but granted him a pension of 2000/. t This 
Was an act of prudence, rather than generosity ; as he well knew, 
that such a genius as Lambert's, rendered desperate by poverty, «a» 
Capable of attempting any thing. Though Lambert had so great » 

• The inscription' of this print u eno»(o*ij he mi never abate the rank of ' 
major-general. 

t Roger Coke informs us, that " sflar ha had been discarded by Oliver, ha he- 
took himself to WimbieWn-houH, where he turned florist, and had the fairest InJiW 
sari gHliflowen that could be got (or lore or money : yet in these outward pleas&fl 
be nourished the ambition he entertained before he wu csishieiad,"— -Coke's " De- 
tection," Etc ii. p. 16. 



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OF ENGLAND. 3 

tare in the civil war, he escaped punishment at the restoration. 
he daring general, when he was brought to his trial, behaved 
ith more submission than the meanest of his fellow- prisoners, and 
as reprieved at the bar. He was banished to the Isle of Guernsey, 
rtiere he continued in patient confinement for above thirty years. 
lee tbe Class of Artists ; see also the preceding reign, Class VII. 

SIR THOMAS TILDESLEY; from a drawing in 
the King's " Clarendon" R, Cooper sc. 4to. 

Sir Thomas Tildesley was a gentleman of a good family, who 
raised men at his own charge at the beginning of the war ; and 
commanded them, till the very end of it, with great resolution and 
courage. He refused to make any composition for his estate, after 
the death of the king, and fonnd means to transport himself into 
Ireland to the Marquis of Ormond; with whom he stayed till, with 
the rest of the English officers, he was .dismissed, to satisfy the 
jealousy of the Irish. He then passed over into Scotland, a little 
before the king marched from thence, on his progress towards Wor- 
cester; and. was killed at WIgan, in Lancashire, on his way to join 
the main body of the king's forces, then at Worcester. 

SIR JOHN MENNIS. C.Warrensc. From a pic- 
ture by Vandyke, in the collection of the Earl of Claren- 
don. 

Sir John Mennis, a seaman and poet, was bora at Sandwich, in 
1598, and educated at Corpus Christi College, Oxford. In the reign 
of Charles I. he was made comptroller of the navy-office, aod 
knighted. About this time he had the command of a ship of war, 
but was deprived of it by the republicans. At the restoration he 
was made governor of Dover Cattle, comptroller of the navy, and 
an admiral. Ob. 1671. He wrote some poems, in a collection 
called " Mnsarnm Delicts?, or the Muses' Recreation," 12mo. 
1656. 

COL. JOHN HEWSON. Vandergucht sc. Svo. 
In Clarendon's " History" 

The Giant, Husonio, that is, Col.Hewson; whole 
length, wood-cut. Before the second part of "Don Juan 



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6 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

are printed in Sir Richard Steel's " Lover." Mrs. Pen ruddock's 
letter, in particular, has several strokes in it of the most natural, the 
most animated, and pathetic tenderness. 

COLON EL JOHN RAYNOLDS ; from a drawing 
hi the King's " Clarendon." R. Cooper tc. 

Colonel Raynolds commanded the six thousand English, sent to 
assist the French in their designs upon the strong places in Flan- 
ders: the season of the year being too far advanced to lay aiege to 
Dunkirk, (he forces sat down before Mardike ; which being reduced, 
the fort was delivered into the hands of Raynolds, with a stipula- 
tion to besiege Dunkirk the following year. . 

After the taking of Mardike, Colonel Raynolds intending to visit 
bis friends in England, was, together with some other officers mat 
accompanied him, cast away, and drowned at aea. 

THOMAS SANDERS, de Ireton, Com. Derb. 
Ann. nee non equitum Tribunus. Balth. Fleshier* p. 
Loggan sc. ft. sk. 

Thomas Sanders, de Ireton, &c. B. Flesitkrs. 
W. Richardson; %vo. 

Thomas Sanders, esq. of Ireton and Caldwell, in Derbyshire, 
was a man of great influence in that county, of which he was castas 
rotulorum and representative in parliament, at the time of the In- 
terregnum. Upon the eruption of the civil war, he had too much 
spirit to be neutral or inactive, and therefore joined the parliament 
army, to which he with great constancy and firmness adhered. He 
commanded a regiment of horse in the service, and bore the rank 
of a colonel till the restoration of Charles the Second. He died in 
1695, aged 85 years. His estate at Caldwell is now possessed by 
Mr. Mortimer) who has several original letters of Oliver Cromwell, 
addressed to Colonel Sanders. 

MAJOR WILDMAN. Hollar/. 1653. It is men- 
tioned in a manuscript catalogue of English heads, 1>JI 
Vertue, which is in my possession. Inscribed " Nil A& 
rnirari," in an oval of palms. 



IsTii. Akmirari 

Major lows Wilumast. 



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OF ENGLAND. 7 

IMajoh John Wildman-; from the above. W.Rich- 

John Wild man, who was educated in the university of Cambridge, 
as a man of. excellent parts, competent learning, insinuating ad- 
reas, and ready elocution; and was, for several years, one of the 
rc*test confidants and most useful instruments of Cromwell. He 
igerly entered into the civil war with a view of making his fortune, 
nctrkeemed to possess every talent that was suited to the purposes 
f jttis own ambition and the genius of the times. He preached, 
irscyed, and wrote with distinction ; and was one of Harrington's 
;lut>t where he appeared to advantage as a politician. He had been 
mertjl the principal agitators for Cromwell ; but perceiving the aim 
^rjiat aspiring man, he turned all his interest, and the whole force 
af lis pen, against him ; and was employed in writing to inflame the 
mini of the levellers, of whom he was the incendiary and director, 
whSm his papers were seized. He was, to the surprise of all men, 
set at liberty, when they were in the highest expectation of his 
exsjeutioii. It was conjectured that the usurper was afraid of exas- 
perijmg a formidable faction of the army ; and that he, by saving 
his life, bad a farther view in engaging so able a man in his service, 
frtBjj a principle of gratitude. He was afterward generally believed, 
and/indeed not lightly, to have been employed by him in secret 

services. It appears that his pen was, during the war, of much 

greater utility than his sword. See more of his character in Lord 

Chradon's " History." 

COLONEL EDWARD ASHTON; a small head, 
in the frontispiece to-Wmstanktft " Loyal Martyrology," 
1666; 8vo. 

Colonel Edwahd Ashton ; enlarged from the 
above print; Svo. 

| This gentleman was brought to trial before the high court of 
justice, that condemned Sir Henry Slingsby aiul Dr. Hewit; 

| charged with a design to fire the city, assassinate the Protector, and 
introduce monarchy in the person of Charles Stuart; several other 
persons were implicated m this plot, and the governing power 
having by imprisonment, and other sinister ends prevailed on same 



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8 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

to accuse other*, many, not* ithitan ding their innocence, wereco 
demned, and among others Col. Ashton, who was hanged, drawn, 
and quartered, July 2, 1658. 

COLONEL BENBOW; a small head, in the fron- 
tispiece to Winstanley's " Loyal Martyrology," 1665; 
8vo. 

Colonel Benbow; enlarged from the print above; 



Colonel Benbow was one of the western gentlemen that rote 
in anna to aid the cause of Charles the Second, about the time he 
marched his forces from Scotland towards Worcester; he had emi- 
nently distinguished himself by his loyalty and valour, during the 
war ; but falling into the hands of some republican troops, he vu 
shot to death at Shrewsbury, in October, 1651. 

MR. BENSON ; a small head, in the frontispiece to 
Winstanley's " Loyal Martyrology," 1665 ; 8vo. 

Mr. Benson; enlarged from the above print ; 8t». 

Mr, Benson, who in the beginning of the war had served in the 
parliament army under Sir John Gell, and was with him at the 
siege of Lichfield ; came over to the king's party, and with Colonel 
Eusebius Andrews, entered into a plan for the restoration of 
Charles II. but the scheme being frustrated, through the treachery 
of one Bernards, he was apprehended, brought to trial, found guilty, 
and suffered death, Oct. 7, 1650. 



MR. JOHN BETTELY ; a small head, in the fron- 
tispiece to Winstanley's " Loyal Martyrology," 1 665 ; 8iw. 

Mil. John Bettely; enlarged from the above print ; 
8vo. 

Mr. John Bettely, who, by Lord Clarendon's account, held the 
rank of colonel in the royalist army, was apprehended, and brought 
to trial before a high court of justice, at which Lisle presided ; 



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OF *N<5lrAWB. V 

charged with adesign to fire the city .of London, flspose the Tro- 
tecior, and proclaim Chftrfes Stuart king. Witriesseswose nddora 
wanting to establish proof against suspected persons ; in Ma- 
sequence he was found guilty, and suffered by banging, in 
Cheapside, July 2, 1658, solemnly protesting his innocence to the 



MICHAEL BLACKBURN; « mail head, in the 

frontwpkoetoWiwtatiieys" Loyal M&rtyrohgy ,"1066.; 
Stw, 

Michael Bxacxbtjkx ; .enlarged from the above 
print; 8w. 

Michael Blackburn enihreHdy distinguished himself by his ser- 
vice and loyally to Gbarlc3 the First, in Whose army he rose to 
the rank of comet of horse. He was one of the intrepid persons 
that surprised and took Pomfret Castle, at the time Raiusborough, 
the governor for the parliament, was put to death ; andbeingsus- 
pected as one of his assassins was executed at York, August 23, 



CAPTAIN BROWN BUSHEL ; a small head, ft* 
the frm&spkce to Win&ariley's " Loyal Martp'ology" 
1665; 8tw. 

Captain Brown Bushel; enlarged from the print 

above; 8w. 

Captain Brown Bushel, an expert seaman, was captain of a man 
of war, and had some kind of command in Scarborough, which he 
delivered up to Sir Hugh Cholmondely, a great friend and partisan 
of Sir John Hotham. Bushel soon after changed sides, and, m 
1643, openly revolted from the parliament, and was taken prisoner 
at Hull for the same; but was exchanged by Hotham (then wind- 
ing about to the king's party) for another person ; he lived some 
years in England, after the war had terminated, unnoticed ; but, in 
1648, was taken into custody for his former desertion, and after 
being detained prisoner about three years, was brought to trial, 
found guilty, and executed, April 29, 1651. 



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10 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

SIR TIMOTHY FETHERSTON-HAUGH 

mall head, in the frontispiece toWtnstatikys " loyal 
M^rtyrology," 1665; 8t». 

Sir Timothy Fethebston-haugh; enlarged from 
the above print; 8w. 

Sir Timothy Fetherstori-baugh, a Lancashire gentleman, in con- 
junction with the Earl, of Derby,, raised som« forces in aid of 
Charles the Second, on his feeble attempt to regain his fathe^i 
crown, but was defeated and mode prisoner b; the parliament army, 
at Wigan , in Lancashire, and suffered death, Oct. S2, 1 651 . 

COLONEL JOHN GERARD; a small head, in 
the frontispiece to Winstanky's " Loyal Martyrology" 

1665; 8vo. 

Colonel John Gerard; enlarged from the above 
print; 8vo. 

-Mr. Gerard, a young gentleman of a good family, who had been 
, an ensign in the king's army, was accused and brought to trial be- 
fore a high court of justice in 1664, for having a design against the 
life of the Protector, to seize upon the Tower, and to proclaim 
Charles Stuart king. He was charged with " having been at Paris, 
and having there spoken with the king ;" which he confessed ; ami 
declared " that he went to Paris upon a business that concerned 
himself (which he named), and when he had dispatched it, and ww 
to return for England, he desired the Lord Gerard, his kinsman, 
to present him to the king, that he might kiss his hand ; which he 
did In a large room, where were many present; and that, when he 
asked his majesty, whether he would command him any service 
into England? his majesty bid him to commend him to his friends 
there, and to charge them that they should be quiet, and not en- 
gage themselves in any plots ; which must prove ruinous to them, 
and could do him (the king) no good."— But however this might 
have been palliated, it came out in proof that Mr. Gerard had been 
present in a tavern, where discourse had been held, " how easy > 
thing it was to kill the Protector, and at the same time to seize 



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Of ENGLAND. 11 

upon the Tower of London ; aod that, if at the same time the king 
were proclaimed, the city of London would presently declare for 
bis majesty, and nobody would oppose hint." 

Upon this evidence he was condemned to be hanged; but the 
sentence was afterward changed to that of beheading, which was 
executed on him July 10, 1654, on Tower-hilt, in the 22d year of 
his age. He told the officers that attended him on the scaffold; 
" that if he bod a hundred lives, he would lose them all to do the' 
king any service," and was now willing to die upon that suspicion ; 
but that he was very innocent of what was charged against him ; 
that he had not entered into, or consented to any plot or conspiracy,- 
nor given any countenance to any discourse to that purpose ; and. 
offered to speak to the people, and to magnify the king: but the 
officers would not Buffer him to proceed ; and thereupon, with un- 
daunted courage, he laid down his head upon the block, which was 
struck off at one blow. 

MR. EDWARD STACY; a small head, in the fron- 
tispiece to Winstanley's " Loyal, Martyrology" 1665 ;, 
8vo. 

Mr. Edward Stacv ; enlarged from the above 
print ; Svo. 

Mr. Edward Stacy was accused, and brought to trial before a 
high court of justice at the same time, and charged with the same 
offence, as Colonels Ashton and Bettely t namely, to overturn the 
then existing government, introduce anarchy, and set up Charles. 
Stuart The witnesses to prove this conspiracy were the same 
as against those. unfortunate gentlemen, who were all found guilty. 
Mr. Stacy: was executed July 4, 1658, opposite the Exchange," in. 
Cornhtll, being the last person that suffered death under the usurpa-: 
lion of Cromwell. Lord Clarendon states him to have held the same; 
rank in the army as Ashton and Bettely. 

GOFFE, colonel William ; from a drawing in the 
King's " Clarendon." R. Cooper sc. 



Colonel Gofle.with Ingolsby and Whalley, proffered their si 
to Richard Cromwell, to oppose a new council of officers, who had 



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13 BIOGRAPHICAL BISTORT 

«*t by their own Mthority,and admitted 1 ernhert, tboogn no- ■«- 
b« of the army, to consult with them as te the Hrttkencnd. of the 
government : they even went » far m to osier to hall s^rahr-n, 
whom they Looked upon as the author of thia conspiracy, if Richard 
mU girc ft warrant to that purpose. The new Prxaacnor wss- 
io^aoluta how to act, l*it in the eud wa» preraifed «poj» by Fleet- 
wood, DeebofMgb, and lome Others, to sign a ooranusasoet to 
dissohe the parliament, which caused awa in that nunate to be 
deprived of an hie greatness and power. IngoUby, WhaHey, awi 
GQ§e> were cashiered, and Lambert reatorod to that power ate had 
been stripped of by (Hirer. The dimensions between the army and 
parliament, accelerated the return of General Honk from Scotland, 
and brought about that change which so awddenly cawed. 

COL. JOHN EILBFRNE, in prison. VandergucAt 

sc. Bvo. 

Jour Lixburne, standing at the bar, on his trial. 
At the top of the print is a medal of his head, with this 
inscription : "John Lilburne, saved by the power of the 
Lord, and the integrity of his jury, who are Judges of 
law, as well as fact. Oct. 26, 1649." The names of 
the jury are on the reverse. See Evelyn's " Numismata," 
p. 170, 171, and Simon's " Medals," plate 22. 

John Littnuroa was tried for transgvessrar the new statutes* 
trenroiu enacted; by thaCoaaaonwealth. He behaved upon his thai 
with his usual intrepidity; and, thong* gwlty, was acquitted by tbe 
jary, who bore rery littie respect to the legislature. Westminster 
Hall resounded with taw aoclasnations of -the people, and the medal 
represented in the print was- struck upea-thni jey&d occasion. This 
nn p n i ax incendiary was- known to have such influence ovof the «- 
publicans and levellers that the parliament stood hi great awe of 
him, and therefore ordered him, after he was discharged by the 
court, to be sent to the Tower. 



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J&rvrur's fes WeailA* /lL, Ttule, hts {time 



OF EKGLANB. 



SCOTCH GENERALS; 

'HAVIBi LESLEY (or Leslie), general of the 
Scotch army ; . 8vo* In Clarendon's ' ' History." 

Uavid Leslef. Ravenetsc. In Smollett's " History. 

"SrSivrd Lesley, who was an able, though in some instances an 

"""" general, learned the art of war under the great Gustavus 

He defeated, but with a much superior army, the broken 

of the heroic Marquis of Montrose. He reduced Cromwell . 

straits before the battle of Dunbar, and fought that fatal 

merely in obedience to the pressing importunities of the sol 

These deluded people were told by their ministers, that they 

been wrestling with the Lord all the night in prayer, and were 

confident that they had obtained the victory. Crvmwell, when 

them advancing to the engagement, exclaimed, with no less 

. ace, " that the Lord had delivered them into ha, hands." 

Bptay v&s a second time defeated by Cromwell at the battle of 
Worcester, where he was taken prisoner, and sent to the Tower. He 
■vug; upon the restoration, set at liberty, and created baron of 
Newark. He is sometimes confounded with his kinsman, the Earl, 
of Leven. 

SIR EWEN CAMERON, chief of the clan 
Cameron. 

" The honest man, whom virtue sways, 
His God adores, his king obeys ; 
Does factions, men's rebellions pride, 
And threatning tyrants' rage deride; 
Honour's his wealth, bis rule, his aim, 
Unshaken, fixt, and still the same." 

In an oval, small Mo. own hair, cravat, armour,- rare. 
Copy of ditto* W. Richardson. 

Sir Kwen Cameion, of Lochiel, was. born in the yeas 1G2.Q> mid: 
brought up under the tuition and management of the Marqvis of 




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14 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

Argyle, who was executed soon after the restoration. Sir Ewea 
nay be classed with Montrose and Dundee ; being illustrious for 
bis loyalty to his sovereign,* his invincible courage, and his pa- 
tience and endurance of fatigue. He was strongly prejudiced in 
favour of hereditary right, and when advanced in years, appeared 
with a numerous train of his followers, the Camerons, at the battle 
of Killicrankie, where he commanded those who stood near him (j 
make a great shout; this was re-echoed by alt the Scots under the 
command of Lord Dundee. The lung's army also shouted, but 
as Sir Ewen observed, iu a " dull, hollow, feeble tone ;" a sure 
prognostic of their defeat. This prediction, which animated Dun- 
dee's army to the highest degree, was verified by the event. 

Sir Ewea Cameron died in 1718, at about ninety years of age, 
having outlived all his faculties of mind and body, as to be treated 
as a child, and rocked in a cradle. See his life in the Appendix to' 
" Pennant's Tour in Scotland." 



OFFICERS OF THE NAVY. 

ROBERT BLAKE, admiral. M. Vandergucht sc. 
Svo. 

Robert Blake, general and admiral of the forces 
of England, &c. Denotes, 17 Aug. 1657, M. 59. 



-" Thy e 



Was heard in thunder through th' affrighted shores 

Of pale Iberia, of submissive Gaul, 

And Tagus trembling to its utmost source. 

ever faithful, vigilant, and brave, 

Thou bold asserter of Britannia's fame, 

Unconquerable Blake!" 

Glover's " London," p SI, 

Done from a painting (late) in the possession of Mr. J. 
Ames, by Captain Thomas Preston. 

* He iu honoured with a letter of thanks from King Charles II. and »u a de- 
termined enerov to Cromwell. After all the neighbouring chiefs were subdued, he 
continued the terror of his enemies; till at last he submitted on the most honourable 
terms, sad no oath was required of Lochiei to Cromwell, but his wad of honour to 
lire in peace. 



OF ENGLAND. 15 

Robert Blake. C. Turner sc. 1810; in an oval; 
mezz. Mo. 

Robert Blake; in the " Oxford Almanack," 1738. 

Blake, who had approved himself a good soldier in the course of 
the civil war, whoa he was above fifty years of age, took the com- 
mand of the fleet. His want of experience seems to have been of 
great advantage to him : he followed the light of his own genius 
only, and was presently seen to have all the courage, the conduct, 
and the precipitancy of a good sea-officer. Forts and castles by 
land were no longer dreaded, or thought impregnable: he attempted 
whatever opposed him, and was generally successful in his attempts. 
The very temerity of his enterprises struck terror into his enemies, 
and contributed greatly to his success. He not only improved the 
method of attack, but carried the naval power of Cromwell to a 
greater height than had been known in any age or nation. 

SIR RICHARD STAINER ; mezz. small Mo. 
Woodburn exc. 

Sir Richard Stainer Was knighted by Cromwell, at Whitehall, 
June 11, 1657, for his valour at the time he commanded the ship 
of war named the Speaker, in the sea-fight under Blake, against 
the Spaniards. He was appointed by Oliver vice-admiral, and 
Charles II. sent him to command the garrison of Tangier, until the 
governor arrived. He was descended from a most respectable fa- 
mily at Droitwich, in Worcestershire. Leaving no children, he 
bequeathed bis property to his brother ; who, by involving himself 
in a law-suit with the Salt Company of Droitwich, was obliged to 
dispose of his estates to the ancestor of Lord Foley. His son was 
afterward reduced to the necessity of getting relief in the Work- 
house of Birmingham; where, in the midst of his wretchedness, it is 
said, he retained his family pride. He certainly was an object of 
great compassion, as his father ruined himself by inventing the pre- 
sent cheap method of making salt 

PEN, reipublicre Anglieanse vice-praefectus maris. 
A head in an oval; \2mo. 



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10 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 



William Pen had all those qualifications tfaa 
natural courage and experience can give a man of a very moderate 
capacity. He was well qualified to act an under part, in executing, 
with alacrity and vigour, what bed been planned by his sap eriow in 
command. He was vice-admiral, under Monck and Dean, i 
famous sea'fight with the Dutch , that contained three days, and in 
which the gallant Tromp was defeated. He was, withont declaration 
of war, sent to take St. Domingo from the Spaniards. The design 
was well laid by Cromwell, and would have been executed wifli 
great facility by a Blake ; but it exceeded the capacity of Ta- 
in thas expedition he took Jamaica, a colony which coat a great 
deal of blood and treasure ; but which, in process of time, proved 
advantageous to the nation. He -was father of a much greater 
man than himself, who is well known among the Quakers as a 
preacher and a writer; and throughout the world as the foiusder 
and legislator of the colony of Pennsylvania.* There is a charac- 
teristic account of Admiral Pen, in the " Continuation of Lorf 
Clarendon's Life," p. 478. 



* See a good account of bim, in his legislative capacity, it) the " Account of I* 
European Settlement! in America." t This illustrious person bad both great si" 
. anriable qualities, and waa no itranger to the oisentials of good bleeding, though be 
■as too stubborn to yield to the formi of it. Be had, or affected to have, all " uV 
■pint of the bat," which availed bim much as the leader of a people who nude H 
part of their religion. We are credibly informed, that he aat with his hat on before 
■Charles II. and that " the king, as a gentle rebuke for his 111 manners, put off lit 
«wn. Upen which Pen aoid to bim, Friend Charles, why dost thou not keep on 
-Hat tat? Tbrkmg-amwered, "Hi the custom of this place, that .never above one 
petsoH should be covered at a1irae."t 

t % Edmund »u*c,«q. hi* without his name. 
t Cinty's " Hudibra-i," i, p, SS€. 



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OF ENGLAND. 



CLASS VIII. 

GENTLEMEN, AND PERSONS IN INFERIOR 
CIVIL EMPLOYMENTS. 

GULIELMUS PASTON, baronettus, 1659. Fat- 
tkornesck.sk. This head is exquisitely finished, 
and is, by Mr. Walpole, esteemed the masterpiece 
of Faithome. — There is a portrait of him, by Van- 
dyck, at Mr. Windham's, at Felbridge, in Norfolk. 

Sir William Paston, of Oxnet, or Oxnead, in Norfolk, was de- Created 
seceded from Sir Clement Paston, an eminent sea-captain, who R ?""*• 
signalized himself in the reign of Henry VIII. by taking the baron 
of Blancard, admiral of France, prisoner, and bringing him into 
England. He was the first, as Lloyd informs us, " that made the 
English -navy terrible."* Sir William was eminently a gentleman, 
and was also distinguished as a traveller. He not only made the 
usual tour, but was carried by his ardent curiosity, into Asia and 
Africa, Few men of his time were more esteemed for their general 
knowledge. He was generous, charitable, and loyal; and piqued 
himself upon keeping, up the ancient hospitality of the family. + He 
died in 1662. j He was father to Sir Robert Paston, who, for his 
eminent services in the civil war, and his activity at the restoration; 
was created viscount Yarmouth; 25 Car. II. Fuller mentions a 
free-school, founded and handsomely endowed by Sir William Pas- 
ton, knight, at North-Walsam, in Norfolk. Qusere if by the same 
person. 

SIR ROBERT SHIRLEY, bart. (whose singular 
praise it is, to have done the best things in the worst 
times, and hoped them in the most calamitous.) J. 
Basire sc. In Nichols's " Leicestershire." 

• " Worthies," Bro. first edit. p. SO*. 
t See the Dedication to May'. •' Accomplished Cook." 
J Her. Mr. Csllrun. 
VOL. IV. D 



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18 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

Sir Robert Shirley, the fourth baronet of bis family, and the only 
surviving ion of Sir Henry, wan an early and zealous advocate for 
the cause of Charles I. which involved htm, at the latter end of Hay, 
1648, in a dispute with the parliamentary garrison at Ashby-de- la- 
Zouch ; and was like to have "been attended with serious con- 
sequences. The particulars of the charges against him, were as 
follow : — 

1st. " That Sir Robert Shirley, with his men and some malig- 
nanta, heing drinking at Ashby-de-la-Zouoh, some of bis men 
guarrelled in the street with a soldier of that garrison for the par- 
liament ; and Sir Robert did ride up to them with his sword by his 
Side, and said he would justify the men in doing it. 

2d. " That, Sir Robert Shirley being disarmed by the soldier, be 
did ride up with his men to the guard of the garrison, and refused 
to stand or stay when the guard willed him so to do, saying he 
would come in ; and some of his men struck the soldiers on guard, 
which occasioned a tumult. And the governor coming forth, pad- 
tied it, and took Sir Robert Into his chamber there; where Sir Ro- 
bber! said, ■ he would justify his men in what they bad done, though 
they had killed some of the soldiers.' 

, : 8d. "That, Sir Robert Shirley being there afterward, he wished 
p two of his men to bring up his comet and his troop; and thereupon, 
.'fitting sent away with a guard to Leicester, he said he had one 
; Hundred 'tnusket3 hid in a coal-pit, and twenty-five case of pistols 
hid there; and that he would be plundering the governor's 
chamber. 

4th. " That, Sir Robert Shirley being thereupon confined to Let- 
' tester, and some prisoners of quality brought in from Willoughby 
fight, Sir Robert went to the marshal's house without leave, and 
bestowed store of wine and bread on them, 'and sat tip most pfCrt 
of the night in private converse and speech with them. 

5th. " That Sir Robert Shirley afterward gave colours to divers 
malign ants in Leicester ; the committee there at the same time list- 
ing and giving colours for die parliament," 

In June, 1648, he Underwent an examination on the above parti- 
culars, but it does not appear in what manner this unpleasant matter 
was ended. The loyalty of Sir Robert, in several other instances, 
having drawn on him the vengeance of the usurping powers, he 
was on seven different occasions imprisoned. On the 4th of May, 
1650, a warrant was issued from the council of state, to seize, 
inventory, and secure, all the estates, real and personal, of Sir 



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OS ENGLAND. 19 

ilobejKt. Shirley, bort, accused of high delinquency; and he wu 
i.im»elf lent to the Tower of Loudon, as a clove prisoner, by an 
>rdar-of the council of state. 

How soon after tiua he. was again imprisoned, we do not learn ; 
mil by his last will, dated Nov. 29, 1654, he gave 10004 to be dit- 
poned of uato such distressed persons as had lost their estates in 
the service of the late King Charles, in such manner as his executors 
should think fit In case the church he was then building at 
Staunton Harold should not be finished before his death, he be- 
queathed ho much as. his executors should think convenient to 
perfect the same according to his intention ; and directs restitution 
to be made of whatever rents or profits he had received of any 
impropriation, tithes, or lands, belonging to any churches, cha- 
pels, &c. ; the tame to be distributed among orthodox and dis- 
tressed clergymen, at the discretion of his executors. He died in 
the Tower, in the very prime of life (not having attained bis 28th 
year), Nov. 6, 1656; not without suspicion of poison. 

Sir Robert Shirley married, in or about 1647, Catherine, daughter 
of Humphrey Okeover, esq. of Okeover, in the county of Stafford, 
and Wimeswould, in the county of Leicester, by whom he had 
issue three sons; 1. Seymour, bis successor; 2. Sewallis, who died 
an infant; 3. Robert, afterward the seventh baronet. Also two 
daughters ; Catherine, married to Peter Venables, esq. baron of 
Kinder ton, to the county palatine of Chester; and Dorothy, married 
to George Vernon, esq. of Sudbury, in the county of Derby, from 
whom the present Lord Vernon is descended. 

SIR nm^Y SLINGSBY; <a tfova Scqtja hfe 
ronet.) From an original, in the possession of — ■ 
Talbot, esq. Vertuesc. One of the set of Loyalists. 

Sir H. SiiNGSBr, bart. J. Basire sc. 

Sir Henry Slingsby, a gentleman of an ancient family in Yorkshire, 
Spent a great part of his ample fortune in the service of Charles I. 
He raised six hundred horse and foot at his own expense, and 
marched at the head of them into the field, to assist the king. He 
was ever in action, daring the civ il war ; and; after die death of 
Charles, was ever solicitous for the restoration of '"-son. He was 
long a prisoner at Hull ; and was tried for contracting with some 
officers to deliver up one of the block-houses, in that garrison. Cor 



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*> BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

the service of Charles II. Cromwell, who wu informed that An 
royalists throughout the kingdom were intent upon a scheme to 
restore the king, wu resolved to intimidate that party, by sacri- 
ficing Sir Henry Slingsby and Dr. Hew it. They were brought be- 
fore the high court of justice where Litle presided. They denied 
the jurisdiction of die court, but were condemned without any cere- 
mony. Sir Henry Slingaby was a man of deeds rather than werdi : 
he laid very little upon his trial, and aa little upon the bcoSoU. 
He persisted in bis loyalty, and told the people that be died for 
being an honest man. He was beheaded the 8th of June, 16*58. 

SIR FRANCIS WILLUGHBY, (or Wu- 

loughbt). T. Man f. 4to. mezz. 

In the print, which is extremely rare, is a view of Wollaton-hau, 
his seat, built in a very particular style. There is a just represen- 
tation of it, by Hollar, in Thoroton s " Nottinghamshire." 'i'to 
portrait was in the possession of Sir William Musgrave, bart. nor 
of Sir M.M.Sykes. 

Sir Francis Willughby, a gentleman of a plentiful fortune sad 
estimable character, was descended from two ancient families of 
his name ; the one seated at Eresby, in Lincolnshire, the other o> 
the Woulds, iu Nottinghamshire. He was ancestor to the present 
Lord Middleton, and father of Francis Willughby, esq. one of 
the most distinguished naturalists that this kingdom has produced. 
The son was prevented from publishing many of his valuable col- 
lections by bis untimely and lamented death, which happened 
July 3, 1672, in the 37th year of bis age. His "Ornithology," 
being a methodical history of birds, was published, both in Latm 
and English, by his friend Mr. John Ray. His " History of 
Fishes," in Latin, was published at the expense of the Royal So- 
ciety : this is less perfect than the other. Indeed this part of na- 
tural history is, for obvious reasons, very imperfectly known. See 
a good account of him in the preface to his " Ornithology." 

SIR FRANCIS ENGLEFIELD, knight and 
baronet, of Wooton Basset ( in the county of Wilts. 
faithorne sc. half sheet ; extra rare.* 

• Tilt print t Fmncis Englefield, oliieli is one of the scarcest in the Big 1 "* 
scries, was boughlfiy Sit M. H. Svkes, at the »le of Sir Janet Winter I Jikc'vpM- 
tmiti, in the je» 1S08, for scieutj guinea*. 



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»::: of England. 21 

a: Sir Francis Eogte&eld (descended from a family, surnaraed from 
csie town of ' Engle field or Engiesfield, in Berkshire, seated there 

1 64 years prior to the Norman conquest) received -the honour of 
p-nighthood from king James I. at East Hamsted, Aug. 10, 1623. 
L.wir Francis was brought up in the Catholic faith, and being alarmed 
ir>t the persecution, commenced against those of his persuasion, in 
xrhe beginning of King Charle's troubles, procured the following 

v :trant of indemnity from being prosecuted on the score of religion. 

. " Charles Rex. ■ . - 

" Whereas our trusty and well-beloved Sir Francis Englefield, 

knight and baronet, being a recusant, is thereby subject to our 

laws find statutes in that case provided: these are to signify our 

royal will and pleasure, that no person or persons shall, at any time 

' hereafter,. sue, prosecute, or implead, either by way of indictment, 

.; information, or otherwise, against the said Sir Francis, for being a 

a. recusant, or convicted by virtue of any of our laws or statutes 

a: against popish recusants, till we shall signify our pleasure to the 

contrary. Given under our signet, at our palace of Westminster, 

■ Dec. 6, in the 10th year of our reign." 

He married Winifred, daughter and coheir of William Brooksby, 

of Sholeby, in the county of Leicester, esq. by whom he had one 

' son, Sir Francis his successor, and three daughters. He died in 

May, 1665, and was buried in Englefield church, Berkshire, with 

this inscription to his memory. 

" Here lies the body of Sir Francis Englefield, bart. He was 
buried in May, 1665, in the grave where formerly Sir Edward 
' Norris had been 'interred." 

SIR JOHN DANVERS ; from a drawing in the 
King's " Clarendon." R. Cooper sc. 

Sir John Dauvers, younger brother and heir of the Earl of Danby, 
was one of the gentlemen of the privy-chamber to Charles I. but 
being of a vain and ostentatious nature, had contracted several 
debts, which he was unable to pay. In order to repair his broken 
fortune, he condescended to become the tool of Cromwell, who 
employed and despised him at the- same time. He was one of the 
judges who sat on the trial of Charles I. and escaped being brought 
to trial by dying before the restoration. 



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33 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

SIR PETER TEMPLE, kat. ILGiigwooJfA 

I'imo. The plate is in. the possession of the i 



Sir Peter Temple, knt. W. Richardson. 

It appear*, upon searching the pedigrees of Ear! 1 

Lard Palmerslon, that there wu only one Sir Pete? fcwajl 
lie*. This gentleman had two wives, bat neither ot-'S 
named Eleanor.* It is evident, then, that the pereoafc ' 
another Sir Peter Temple, or Peter Temple, esq.f i " 
apprenticeship to a linen-draper, in Friday- street, J 
upon the death of hie elder brother, he left his trade, i 
•eiiion of an eitate of about 400/. a year, i 
being elected » representative for the town of I 
aat In the Long Parliament, where be rendered hii 
able, that he wai nominated one of the king's judges, - 
the warrant for hit execution. He was therefore excepte*|j 
from the act of oblivion at the restoration. His life was, hi 
■pared ; but he was sentenced to perpetual imprlsonrnei 
probably ended his days. - 

SIR HUGH CARTWRIGHT, Chevalier 1 
ogvJGO, An. 165G. Diepenbeke del. Lucas Vorsta 
jun. «. h. sh. 

Sir Hugh Cartwright. Diepenbeke $1. 4M 
W. Richardson. 

. Sir Hugh Cartwright was a younger son of William Cartwright, 
esq. of Ossington, in Nottinghamshire, whose family are of gre^t 
antiquity in that county. Sir Hugh married the daughter and co 
heiress of Cartwright, of Edington ; by her he left a son, seated a 
Edingley ; and a daughter, who married William Cartwright, esq...nf j 
Norman ton. Sir Hugh lies buried in Southwell Minster, but thn * 
inscription is defaced. He is mentioned in Lord . Clarendon's 
" History," vo(. 3, b.XI. 

•See Clan XI. 

t H« lisme u not in uje list of C*om*cli'( inighto. 



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PuhJarr>Ujgi) by YRtchardfun N'5'flrand. 



J,gil zed by GOOgle 



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OF ENGLAND.' 23 

SIR RICHARD CHIVERTON, lord mayor of 
London ; sitting in an elbow-chair. This print is un- 
common. Sir Richard Chiverton was elected into 
ofece, 1657. 

ROBERT HENLEY, esq. " Faithorne ad vimmf. 
1658."* 

I take this gentleman to hare been the same person with Sir 
Robert Henley, knight, who wag master of the King's Bench office : 
but quffire. Quaere also, whether his father did not build the 
Grange, in Hampshire, after a plan of Inigo Jones: this is one of 
the most capital of bis works. Sir Robert Henley was undoubtedly 
the direct ancestor of Robert, earl of Nortliingtou. 

ROBERT RAWLINSON, of Cark, in Lanca- 
shire, esq. 0*. 1665, M.. 55.f Nutting sc. Ato. 

Robert Rawlmson, of Cark -hall, in Lancashire, was descended 
from a Very ancient family of that name, formerly seated at Furnace 
Fells, in the same- county. This gentleman was son of William 
Rawlinson, esq. by Margaret Curwen, only daughter of Walter 
Curwen, of Mireside-hall, in Cartmell, esq. He was many years 
a justice of 'the peace; one of the justices of Oyer and Terminer 
for the counties palatine of Lancaster and Cheshire, and vice-cham- 
berlain for the city of Chester. He was father to Curwen Raw- 
lie son, and grandfather to Christopher Rawlinson, esq. a person of 
some eminence, who is again mentioned in the reign of Charles II. 

MR. JOHN CLEYPOLE ; a small head in Simon's 
" Medals" G. Vertue sc. 4to. 

Mb. John Cletpole. W. Maddocks sc. Ato. 

This gentleman, who married Elizabeth, the favourite daughter of 
Oliver Cromwell, had permission in August, 1651 , to raise a troop 

* Venue's MS. 

t Thii head fj in (Ire Mm plate u-Hh Nhzhoiu MonCk, bishop of Hereford, aod 

■mnlotbmefite IUa«t»ocr«nfly. 



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24 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

of bone, of inch as should voluntarily came to him, in the counties 
of Northampton and Lincoln, or elsewhere, and they were to be 
paid by the parliament, according to the establishment of the army. 

When his father-in-law was invested with the title of Protec- 
tor, he received from him the office of master of the horse ; and, 
as such, led' the horse of state at the inauguration, going bare- 
, headed on one side of the Protector's body-coach, with Strickland, 
captain of the guard to his highness ; he acted in the same capacity 
at the second, or more magnificent investment, when he stood im- 
mediately behind the Protector during the ceremony. 

His mild and gentle disposition rendered him unfit for any ser- 
vices of Cromwell's but such as were of the peaceable kind, and 
which he was lavish in giving him, both as the husband of his fa- 
vourite child, and as a- most amiable person. Oliver nicely adapted 
the places to the persons he employed ; instead therefore of ap- 
pointing Mr. Cleypole to be a major-general, where severity and 
rigour was necessary, he gave him places of great honour and emolu- 
ment, but of such a nature as the most scrupulous might accept, 
even during a usurpation: perhaps he had a farther design i 
this, that he might not feel the effects of any future revolution, 
that might have otherwise endangered his fortunes, and conse- 
quently his dearest daughter's. Her delicacy too, in these matters, 
might also have its weight ; from, some, or all of these causes, w 
do not see him employed in any office of magistracy. 

He was appointed by his father-in-law one of the lords of bis 
bed-chamber, clerk of the hanaper, and ranger of Wittlewood, or 
Wittlebury forest, in Northamptonshire, where he built a magnifi- 
cent seat, which now belongs to the Duke of Grafton, the first duke 
having had a grant of the forest in 1685, with the title of hereditary 
ranger. To raise him still farther above the rank of a private gen- 
tleman, he was created a baronet, July 16, 1657, having that day 
been knighted at Whitehall; and in the same year he was- made 
one of the lords, and placed in his. father's other house. 

During the short reign of his brother-in-law Richard, he retained 
all his places at court, and carried the sword of state when his 
highness went to open his parliament — As he had never, during 
the time of his relations' holding the helm, done any action that 
could even inconvenience an individual, at the restoration he found 
not an enemy, but in every one a friend. 

Some years afterward, however, when the court and the country 
vied with each other, which could invent the most improbable and 



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OF ENGLAND. 2S 

ridJcwjlous plots, he, the most unlikely man in die threa kiagdOrns, 
was filed upon to be (he head and contriver of one against the royal 
family, in consort with the old Oliverian party. Upon this pretence 
be vM apprehended in June, 1878, and sent to the Tower ; obtain- 
ing a habca* corpus to the King's Bench, he thought to procure 
bail ; but though many persons, to whom no objection cotild be' 
made, offered themselves for that purpose, yet Chief-justice Seoggs, 
who was the toed of the court, set the penalty so high, that his 
friends thought it prudent to decline it; he was therefore re- 
manded back to the Tower ; but the next term, as no evidence 
appeared against him, and what was, perhaps, much more fortunate 
to biro, a counter-plot began to work, he was discharged. His only 
crime, says an historian, " seems to be his having married one of 
Cromwell's daughters ;" which Charles II. would gladly have done, 
if he could by it have recovered his crown. 

History is silent what became of him after his enlargement; 
probably he returned to his estate in Northamptonshire, where 
he resided when ho was taken into custody; and then spent the 
remainder of his life in a happy tranquillity, which his virtues de- 
served, and which, from his taste for study, he certainly might do, 
without ever looking back to those gay scenes his youth had been 
spent in. He had a taste for mathematics, and probably architec- 
ture, as he was the intimate friend Of Mr. afterward Sir Christopher 1 
Wren : in his religions sentiments he was a Presbyterian, and hr 1 
that communion died. 

SIR HENRY HYDE ; a small head, in the/rontis- 
piece toWinstanleys " Loyal Martyralogy" 1665; 8vo. 

Sir Henry Hyde ; enlarged from the same print; 
8vo. 

Sir Henry Hyde, brother to the Earl of Clarendon, a gentleman 
of great knowledge and ability, particularly expert in navigation, 
was selected by Charles the Second, during his exile, to represent 
him as ambassador to the Grand Signior, both as to matters con- 
cerning his state and dignity ; as for the protection of his loyal 
subjects, as merchants trading to the Porte. The English govern- 
ment undet the Commonwealth, however, so wrought on the Vizier 1 
by their agents, that he was seised on, and sent prisoner to England 
before be had an opportunity of obtaining an audience or presenting 



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{16 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

his credential!. After remaining; some lime in the Tower, .he wst I 
brought before a high court of justice, purposely erected, 8*1 | 
charged with the design of seizing the English merchants' effects b 
the Turkish dominions ; and affronting Sir Thomas Bendiah, the 
Commonwealth's resident there, with his new commission. After 
atrial of considerable length, in which he most ably defended hta- 
■elf, wholly denying any responsibility to the Common wealth, as s 
subject, having a commission from bis sovereign out of their juris- 
diction, in a foreign land, he was found guilty, and sentenced to 
be beheaded, which death he suffered against the Old Exchange, 
in Cornhil), March 4, 1650, courageously glorying in the cause he 



■ MR. GIBBONS ; a small head, in the frontispiece 
tpWinstanley's " Loyal Martyrology " 1665; 8tw. 

Mit. Gibbons ; enlarged from the print above f - 8vo. 

Mr. Gibbons, a rigid Presbyterian, was charged with high-treason 
against the state, for holding a correspondence with Charles the 
Second and his party, and supplying them with money, contrary 
to an act of parliament in that case provided. He was "brought 
before a high court of justice, with Mr. Love a Presbyterian clergy- 
man, and both sentenced to death, by beheading; which was exe- 
cuted on them August 20, 1651, on Tower-hill. 



MR. KENSEY ; a small head, in the frontispiece to 
Winstanley's " Loyal Martyrology," 1665; 8vo. 

Mr. Kensev ; enlarged from the print above; 8vo, 

Mr. Kensey, a gentleman of great credit and esteem in the west 
country, was one of those royalists who joined Colonels Penrnd- 
dock and Grove in their rising at Salisbury, in order to proclaim, 
and restore King Charles the Second ; but the enterprise failing, 
Mr- Kensey with eleven other gentlemen, were taken prisoners, 
tried by a council of war, found guilty, and suffered death it 
Exeter in May, 1655. 



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OF ENGLAND. 2? 

ANTHONY ASCHAM; from a drawing in the 
King's " Clarendon." R. Cooper, sc. 

Anthony Ascham was chosen by the parliament to be sent into 
Spain, as their agent, or ambassador, to reconcile that court to the 
measures which England had adopted with respect to the late king; 
bnt lie bad scarcely entered Madrid a day, when himself and in- 
terpreter a Franciscan friar, named Riba, were assassinated in their 
chamber, by about half a dozen persons who went with a determi- 
nation to sacrifice Ascham, who had a hand in drawing up the 
charge against Charles I. and was author of " A Discourse on the 
Revolutions and Confusions of Governments." The murderers 
escaped unmolested, and sought sanctuary in an adjoining chapel, 
from whence, with the exception of one, they subsequently made 
their es cap* unnoticed. 

JOHN HOLT. Loggan sc. Over his head are two 
withered branches of cypress. 

This print was prefixed to " A plant of Paradise, being a Sermon 
preached at St. Martin's in the Fields, at the Funeral of John 
Goodhand Holt, the young Son, only Child, and hopeful Heir of 
Thomas Holt, of Grislehurst, in the county of Lancaster, Esq. 
19 March, 1659; by R. M. (Mossom) Minister of St. Pet. P. W.» 
London," printed 1660. The text is from Ezekiel.chap. xvii. v. 22, 
" 1 will crop off from the top of his young twigs a tender bue, and 
will plant it on a high mountain and eminent." This young gen- 
tleman, whom the author styles " the last-born of the family, and 
the first-born of his mother," died of a fever, upon the 12th oF 
March, 1659, in the 12th year of his age. 



PERSONS IN CIVIL EMPLOYMENTS. 

JOHN MILTON, who wrote and spoke the Latin tongue with 
great facility and elegance, was Latin secretary to Cromwell. His 
letters, which are still extant, have been ever esteemed the com- 

• St. Pettr'i, Paul'j -Whsrf. 



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Si BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

plejest models for his successor* in that office-' Sea Chaw IX. in 
thii , and die two preceding reigns. 

SIR CHRISTOPHER PACKE, knt. lord mayor 
of London, 1655; in Nichols's "History of Leicester- 
shtre" 

Christopher Packe, esq. citizen and draper, was the bob of Chris- 
topher Packe, of Finchiey, in the county of Middlesex., (a merchant 
of London, and derived from a family originally of Northampton- 
shire). In an ordinance of parliament, Oct 9, 1646, for settling 
the possession of the bishops' lands to the use of the Coram on weal tit, 
Mr. Packe was appointed a trustee. He was elected alderman of 
Cripplegate-ward, Oct. 4, 1647, and so acceptable were his magis- 
terial services, that, on the 9th of February following, he was one of 
the four persons nominated by the ward of Langboura to be their 
alderman ; but, not having then been two years an alderman in hia 
former ward, he was ineligible. 

Jan. 19, 1648-9, he purchased for $1741. 16*. 64. the manor of 
the bishop of Lincoln, at Buckden;* which for some time became 
his occasional residence. May 30, 1649, he was one of the fifteen 
aldermen who attended the lord mayor, in proclaiming the act for 
abolishing the kingly government: June 10, was again put in no- 
mination as an alderman for the ward of Cheap ; and oo Midsum- 
mer-day following was elected one of the sheriffs of London. Oct 2, 
having been nominated an alderman for Contrail- ward, he accepted 
the change ; but, in a few days, was prevailed on to continue with 
his original friends. At Michaelmas 1654, he was elected to fill 
the civic chair; and took his >eat October 2, as " lord mayor elect" 
About this period he received the honour of knighthood from 
Oliver Cromwell, the lord-protector, at Whitehall ( and in the 
entry of the proceedings of the first court of aldermen which he 
held, Nov. 7, he is styled " the Right Honourable Sir Christopher 
Packe, )ord mayor." Sept.-B0, 165$,'fce was appointed joint-trea- 
surer, with Alderman Viner, far the money, which was a very large 
sum collected throughout the kingdom, for the use of the- suffering 

* X" the negotiations with the Swedish ambsMftdor, in 1G56, be complained to 
Wbillock of the delay of his busmen, and of tending the article* of tbe treaty 
with Sweden " to one Mr. Milton, a blind man, to put tbein into Latin." See 

W hillock's " Memorials." p, &J3. 



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OF ENGLAND, 29 

vValdeoses in Piedjpont- In January 1655-6, the lord-protector 
and his council purposed to send Sir Christopher Packe, in conjunc- 
tion with Mr. Whitlock, on an extraordinary embassy to the King 
of Sweden; their intention in sending Sir Christopher being to mani- 
fest the engagement of the city in the business, Feb. 21, 1656-7, 
being at that time a commissioner of the customs, and treasurer flt 
war, be brought forward the important question, " That the Pro- 
tector might be desired to assume the style of king, as the most 
known and agreeable government;" and had, for a short tune, the 
title of " Lord Packe," as one of Oliver's " other house of parlia- 
ment." May 8, 1660, he regularly attended, as an alderman, at 
the king's proclamation ; and on the 5th of June signed a decla- 
ration together with the lord mayor, one of the sheriffs, and ten 
other aldermen, of " their acceptance of his majesty's free and ge- 
neral pardon ; engaging (by God's assistance) to continue his ma- 
jesty's loyal and obedient subjects." Notwithstanding this, he was 
included, June 16, amongst the twenty persons, " to be excepted 
out of the act of general pardon and oblivion, for and in respect 
only of such pains, penalties, and forfeitures (not extending to life), 
as shall be thought fit to be inflicted on him by another act intended 
to be hereafter passed for that purpose ; but, on the 13th of August, 
at the express recommendation of the House of Lords, his name 
was omitted in the list of persons excepted;" provided, however, 
that he should never from that time accept any office, ecclesias- 
tical, civil, or military, or any other public employment. He was 
accordingly, with six others who had been lord mayors during the 
usurpation, removed from the office of aldermen, and, after that 
period, resided many years in hospitable retirement at Cotes, where 
he was living at the time of the heraldic visitation in March 1G81-2; 
but died on the 17th of May following, at the age of about 89. 

JOHN WASH,' esq, alderman of Worcester,' born 
in the year 1590 ; gave various charities to the citi- 
zens. J. Ross sc. h.sh. In Nash's" History of Wor- 
cestershire" 

This benevolent gentleman left to honest young tradesmen 800£ 
to be lent without interest. To the parishes of St.. Martin and 
St. HeleoS/. yearly tp apprentice young lads, To trustees, named, 
he gave sundry estates in Powick and St Martin's, together with 



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30 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

the tithe of Powick, as a perpetual fund for the building and en- 
dowment of a hospital for eight poor men and two poor women, 
preferring always such as shall be of his name or kindred. He 
orders the overplus and savings of his estate, before bequeathed 
(whilst it is a small sum), to be lent to young tradesmen without 
interest, but when it shall amount to a sum sufficient to purchase 
lands of the clear yearly value of 8/. the same to be given to the 
parishes of St. Andrew and St. Nicholas, for the apprenticing 
young lads, and so in like manner 4£ yearly to the several parishes 
of St. Peter, All Saints, and St. Swithin; and to St. Clement and 
St. Alban, 11. each yearly. The next savings from his estate, when 
under 100?. to be lent to young tradesmen gratis, when it amounts 
to that sum, to be laid out in land, and the produce applied to cloth- 
ing poor freemen for ever. He orders that no lease of his estate 
thus bequeathed, be made in reversion or for a term exceeding 
twenty-one years from the commencement thereof in possession. He 
orders that the corporation of the city of Worcester shall use their 
best means, at the charge of his executors, to have bis charities 
settled by act of parliament. He orders likewise his will, so far at 
relates to his charitable bequests, to be publicly read by the town- 
clerk, at the Guildhall of the said city, on the first Friday in Lent, 
and he to receive for his trouble five shillings. How well these 
his wise directions have been observed, a strict inquiry will best 
declare. The picture of Alderman Nash, from which the print it 
taken, was painted in 1658. 



CLASS IX. 

MEN OF GENIUS AND LEARNING. 

PHYSICIANS. 

THE. TURQUET de MAYERNE, eques auratus, 
patria Gallus, religions reformdtus, dignitate baro, pro- 
fessione alter Hippocrates, ac trium regum (exanpk 
rarissimo) arckiater, Ǥrc. JEt. 82. Before his Worh; 
folio. 



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OF ENGLAND* 31 

Theo. deMATERNE, eques auratos, baro Albonse, 
in aula magna regis Britannia!,* archiatrorum comes, 
JEt. 82. W. Elder sc. Svo. 

Both these prints represent him holding a scull. He is perhaps 
as fine a figure, for a man of 82, as was ever seen. 

Theo. de Mayebne ; in a loose flowered dress ; left 
hand on a stick; Svo. scarce. 

Theo. de Mayebne ; in do. 12mo. See the pre- 
ceding reign, Class IX. 

WALTER CHARLTON ; neatly engraved by P. 
Lombart ; Svo. prefixed to his " Treatise on the Soul," 
1657. This plate has four Latin lines ; the name of 
Charleton and the lines hare been erased, and since 
printed inside of a border plate, with the name and 
lines at the bottom of the border, so as to form a 
folio print. See an account of this learned and emi- 
nent physician, in the reign of Charles II. 

CHRISTOPHORUS BENEDICTUS ; without 
his name. Under the head is this distich : 

" Hospitii, quicunque petis, quis Incola tanti 
Spiriting ; egregia hunc, consule, scripta dabunt." 

•'Chr. Teme, M.D.C.L." 
Lombart sc Svo. 

This print has been thought to represent Dr. Christopher Terne, 
a licentiate of the college, who wrote the distich ; but it was done 
for the following person : 

Christopher Bennet; a native of Raynton, in Somersetshire, was 
educated at Lincoln College, in Oxford. He was a distinguished 
member of the College of Physicians, and in very considerable 

* Sis prig. 



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M BIOGRAPHICAL BISTORT 

ync&ut. Mr. Wood informs us, tint h* 4 

Tabidorum VestibuloTu," 1654, 8to ; and of 

noeticce," 1655; and that he corrected and t 

" Health' b Improvement." His death, which happeaed aboattse 

tofintiiug: of May, 1 655, prevented his puM ij h ia sj— i t «r two bosfa 

more which be had prepared for the press. 

TOBIAS VENNER, M. D. 1660, M. 85 (83) 
Faithurm sc. small Ato. Copied by W. Richardson. 

Tobias Venrter practised physic for many years at Bridgewater, 
and other places in Somersetshire ; but in the latter part of his list 
in and near Bath. He was author of several medical books, the 
Chief of which is his " Via recta ad Vitam longam, or A Treatise 
wherein the right Way, and the best Manner of living, for attaining 
ta ■ long and healthful life', is clearly demonstrated." ' This book 
was Ant published in 1690. It is written in a plain and profit 
Style, inch as was then used in common conversation. The doctor 
acted judiciously in adapting a book of general use to ordinary ca- 
pacities ; and we are told by Mr. Wood that it got him roost of his 
practice. He wrote upon Bath Waters, and informs us, that they 
were not prescribed to be taken, inwardly by any regular physician. 
It it observable, that his " Censure on Bristol Water" id the first 
treatise of the kind in our language. Dr. Ouidot, in his "Lives 
•nd Characters of the Bath Physicians," subjoined to his " Dis- 
course of Bath," tells us, that in the " Via recta,'' &c. is this memo- 
rable observation, " That a gammon of bacon is of the same nature 
with the rest of the bog." — -His general character was that of a 
plain man, and a good and charitable physician. Ob. 1660, Ml. 83. 
He is supposed to have prolonged his own life by observing the 
rules laid down in his book. 



JOHN BULWfiR, chirosopher, 1650. Frontis- 
piece to his "Artificial Changeling;" 12mo. The next 
print is before the quarto edition of the same book. 

. Johannes Bulwer, cognomento cbirosophus, 
alias philocophus, vultispes tnsignis: utriusque phy- 
siognomic protomystes : patkomyotomus : naturalis lo- 



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OF ENGLAND. 33 

Itela primus indagator: anatomus moralis : Stagirita 
bvus: molestarum clarissimus : stator augustus et vin* 
fcr Ttaturee; M. D. fyc. Faithornesc. 8va. 

Dr. Bulwer was author of several books of the Language of the 
land, of Physiognomy, and of Instructions to the Deaf and Dumb ; 
atended, as he expresses it, " to bring; those who are so born to 
tear the sound of words with their eyes,* and thence to leam to 
(peak with their tongues." He was also author of " Pathomyo- 
toiuia, or a Dissection of the significative Muscles of the Affections 
of the Mind)" 1649, 12mo.t The most carious of his works is 
his " An thropo- Metamorphosis; Man transformed, or the artifi- 
cial Changeling ;" in which he shews what a strange variety of 
shapes and dresses mankind hare appeared in, in the different 
ages and nations of the world. At the end of the first edition of 
this book, in 12mo. is a catalogue of the author's works in print 
and manuscript. 

ROBERTUS BAYFIELD, Mt. 25, 1654. Fai- 
thome sc. In a hat ; Svo. finely engraved. 

Robertus Bayfield, Mt. 27. Fatikorne sc. In 
a black scull-cap; Svo. 

The following are the titles of two of his books. He was proba- 
bly author of some others, of which I have received no information. 
The reader will perceive an anachronism in comparing the title of 
the first with the dates of his two portraits : but this is not alto- 
gether unusual in frontispieces, which are sometimes prefixed to 
different works of the same writer, or to different editions of the 
same work. " Tractatus do Tumoribus prater Naturam ; or a Trea- 
tise of preternatural Tumours. By Robert Bayfield, Physician," 

* Mr Cliffe, a deaf and dumb gentleman now living,! u fanJoui for undemand- 
ing anj Uiing said to him, by Ibe motion of the lip* only. 

■ t The human physiognomy ii eiplained in the " Crounian Lectures on Maacnjar 
Motion," for the year 1746 ; read before the Royal Society, by James Partom, 
K. D. and F. R. S- being a Supplement to the " Philosophical Transactions" for 



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34 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

Load. 1683, 8vo. Hii bead with the cap, Ml. 37, is prefixed to 
this book, which is dedicated to Bishop Reynolds, of Norwich; 
and a second part of it to the famous Sir Thomas Brown, M. D. of 
that city: viz. " Eiercitationes Anatoraicte in v arias Regiones hu- 
man! Corporis, a Roberto Bayfield, Medico: Edit 2*. Lorn). 16"" 
12mo. The second treatise U dedicated to his dear kinsman, 
Robert Gawsell, esq. and a second part of it to his loving relation, 
John Repps, esq. both of them justices of the peace for Norfolk. 

It is probable that none of the following persons in this division 
were graduates. Qu«re. 

DR. EVERARD, in his study, smoking his pipe; a 
book opmbefore him ; 12»w. 

Da. Giles Everard ; 8vo. W. Richardson. 

Dr. Everard had a higher opinion of the virtues of tobacco, both 
In the prevention and cure of diseases, than ever Dr. Ralph Thorius 
had* He was author of a book entitled " Panacea, or a universal 
Medicine, being a Discovery of the wonderful Virtues of Tobacco;" 
1669; small 8vo. To this book is prefixed his portrait. 

NICHOLAS CULPEPPER, eques. Cross sc. 4 to. 
Before kis " English Physician ;" fol. 1652. 

Nicholas Culpepper ; his right hand on a scull; 
l2mo. 

Nicholas Culpepper, in his hair; two different; 
l2mo. 

Nicholas Culpepper; in the frontispiece to " Ri- 
verius's- Work with Cole." 

The portraitabove described, is prefixed to his " School of Phy- 
sic,"- published after his decease by his widow, who married to her 
second husband John Heydon, a noted student in physic and 

■ Sec Ma Poem on Tobacco in the " Maw Anglicans." 



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0F ENGLAND. 35 

Lstrology, and a. great dealer in horoicopM. About the time of 
he restoration was published, " The beautifying Part of Physic," 
>y Nicholas Culpepper. 

Effigies RICHARDI TOMLINSON, JEt. 23. 

Cross sc. a small oval, in the title to his Translation of 
Renodanis's " Dispensatory ,** 1657. 

Nothing but the youth of this translator, who was an apothecary, 
can excuse his nauseous bombast and affectation in the preface to 
the reader : 

And ill goes dovm like oiymcl of squills. - RoSMMIOK. 



POETS. 

MILTON ; from a drawing of Mr. Deacon, taken 
from an impression of a seal of T. Simon, in the posses- 
sion of Mr. Yeo. 

Milton ; engraved by T. Holloway, from the same. 

Milton ; engraved by Ryland, from the same seal. 
This is much better executed than the former. See Class 
VIII. &c. 

EDMUND WALLER, in his famous Panegyric on Cromwell, 
has exceeded himself almost as much as the Protector did other 
men. His genteel reply to Charles II. in regard to his poem, is 
well known. It is also well known that the conquests of Charles 
were of a very different kind from those of Cromwell, and that they 
would hare made a much worse figure in verse. See the reigns of 
Charles I. and II. 

SIR WILLIAM D AVENANT, when tragedy and comedy were 
held in equal abomination with the Liturgy, introduced an opera 
called " The Siege of Rhodes," under the notion of an innocent 



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36 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

miuical performance." This wu the first drseaMir piece of a* 
kind ever exhibited on tbe English stage. See the rag» rf 
Charlm I. and II. to the Utter of which his p 



THOMAS MAY, esq. 

chapkt of laurel. Before th 
viary of the History of the 

Thomas May, esq. &c. 

Thome* May, a celebrated poe 
quainted with the greatest wits of 
In the first class of thoie who boi 
of several dramatic pieces, and of 
of Henry II. aud Edward III. eai 
But his principal work is his " ' 
and hit Continuation of. that Po 
He translated the latter into Li 
must take our eitimate of him at 
our versification when he wrote, 
gunge since, have contributed i 
Latin translation. He alio trans); 
and had a hand in the translation 
was his " Hiitory of the Parliamt 
meiit of the same in Latin and Ei 
this history than the royalists we 
ii lest elegance than one would 

* Among other eauiei of tbe lopprei 
pamphlet which hid a »«y oonaidenibti 
or a Holiikm of Iht wonderful Hand < 
Ihsre, where tome were atiin ; together w 
tint Occttlon, by John Rows, of C. C. ( 

In (he " Hiitorli Hittrlonici," pnbliihed in 1699, Bvo. ii ■ concise biitoty of 
the acton durln| the rebellion, " shewing bow honourably tbej icrvcd in the king'* 
army. Next how they returned to icting, bat primely ; and in OJiTcr's time, it 
Holland-bouse." Bee in abstract of thil pamphlet in Oldjs's British LihrariW 

p. fli. 

t Bishop Wirburton wrote in his copy of May's Hiitory, " thil hiitory ii viittei 
with much teniptr, moderation, and judgment, and with great vigour of style and 
Kaiimcnt."— Lean Hjiilii. 



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OF ENGLAND. 37 

and classical a scholar. He was secretary to the parliament. Ob. 
13 Nov. l650,JEt.55* 

THOMAS STANLEY, arm. P. Lelyf. Faitkorne 
sc. ajine head. Before the first edition of his " History 
of Philosophy," 1655 ; fol. 

Thomas Stanley, a polite scholar, an accomplished gentleman, 
and an eminent poet and historian, was author of many pieces in 
verse and prose. His original poems are, for the most part, on 
amorous subjects. His translations, which are more numerous, 
are from Theocritus, Anacreon, Bion, Secundus, &c. His version 
of, and commentary on '' jEschyli Tragcedise septem, cum Scholiis 
Greeds omnibus, et deperditorum Dramatum Fragment is," 1664, 
fol. is a laborious and valuable work. This ancient Greek poet, 
like some of the precious relics of sculpture and architecture of 
his country, has suffered much from the injuries of time, but is still 
admirable, though greatly impaired and mutilated. The " History 
of Philosophy," by our author, is a work of great merit, and gene- 
rally known. Ob. 12 April, 1678. 

CHRISTOPHER WASSE (or Wase), M. A. 
black cap, own hair; a small oval. 

This ingenious person, who was a perfect master of the Greek 
and Latin languages, was some time fellow of King's College, in 
Cambridge, and afterward superior beadle of law, in the university 
of Oxford. He translated Grothis's " Catechism" into Greek 
verse. t His English translation of Gratius's " Cynegeticon," and 
his comment on that elegant poem, are a sufficient proof of his abi- 
lities. Mr. Waller addressed a copy of verses to him on this per- 
formance. Mr. Hearne, at page 20 of his Discourse prefixed to 

* Payne Fisher, poet-laoreat Id Cromwell, a copious, and not inelegant writer Of 
Latin verses, flourished before and after the restoration. The following character 
byStiada ii exactly suited to him. " Nulliu hodie mortnliurn aut nascitur, aut 
■oritur, aut pneliatar, aut rusticatur, aut abit peregre, out redit, aut nubit, aut est, 
ant non est (nam etlam mortals late canit) cui non ills extenplo cudat Epicedia, 
Grnethliaca, Protrepttea, Panegjrica, Epithalamia, Vaticlnia, Propemptica, Sote- 
rica, Pananetica, Nsniai, Niigas." See a catalogue of his works in the " Athena 
Oionieoses." I have met with no portrait of this person. 

t The original is in latin Terse. 



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lU pl|()iili volume of Leland'i " li 

" that eminent philologer ;'" ami — *-n 



wf * *"ti nt hii, of both hii names, **n ts £flmjfCCCi 
0*Jfjrrl. H.'o J)r. Buil Rennet'* n^aeaeii ■■■■ i ™«™« 
trf ll." » (<■« tti of Dr. Creed and Mr. Wars* if* m_ In* fate sM 
Auffiiti 3D, IODO, 

INWARD BENLOWES, esq. FStf-* U,-7k* 
;V/i7«, or fave's Sacrifice-" fol. 1652. 7 Ma*** it aw 

engraved by Harlow. 

HnwAiiJ) Bknlowes; a smalt ovt, smrrmmkirfk 
taunt foliage, Dan. King sc. In a sheet which cmttni 
snmntt v'mvi of the old church of St. Paul-, together with 
tome verses by this author. 

linwAHD Bknlowes; 8co. IV. Richardson. 
TWn U ft portrait of him in the master's lodge, at Sr_ John's i 
tUMp^P, In ('utiibritltfc, where he was educated, and to which be 
«»i n Itfne factor. There is another in the picture gallery it Oi- 

Pmt. 

Mwnni JluiiloTi'ci* (or Bendlowes), was a man of genteel ac- 
*'rtfif»li»liriprtit*. He was a great patron of the poets aud other 
wtiii-t* nt 111* time, upon whom he lavished a great part of bis for- 
tHH* t II" was author of a coniiderable number of poems in Una 
UHii MttgUnh, iho chief of which ii his " Theophila," which gives « 
ft filgW IrW of hi* piety than his poetical talents; though there 
nr- timitv uncommon and excellent thoughts in- it. But his met*- 
tAn,r*tn* often strained and far-fetched, and he sometimes loses 
I, unfit in mystical divinity. His Latin verses are generally better 
li>mi hi* Kntfllsb, Ho died, in great want, 1686, -&1.73. See 
nun* nt liim )u the " Atheo. Oxon," See also Howel's " Letters," 
w>\, II, frlter I.XVi.f 

* II- ttrulo hii name Benlowei. 

t ID* jiriy cr, it p. 19, of his " Theopbila," hu been deservedly admired. I*' 
■uiltming It » quoUtlun from it: " Let religion and right reran role a> sovereign » 
uw, inillul Uic Irascible and concupiscible faculties be their subjects! Giren<i> 
runic bnlsnccd between want and waste, pity and envy : give me grace to >\" wi 
my wrahb and strength In thy service : let all my melancholy be repenlsoce, »■;" 



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OF ENGLAND. 39 

WILLIAM CHAMBERLAIN. A.Hertocksf. Bvo. 
Before his " Pkaronnida." 

William Chamberlain, a doctor of physic at Shaftesbury, in Dor- 
■ctsUirc, was author of a play called " Love's Victory," printed in 
[to. 1658, and acted in 1678, under the title of " The Wits led by 
he Nose, or the Poet's Revenge." He also wrote an heroic poem, 
:alled " Fharonnida," printed in 8vo. 1659. This was published in 
(rose, as a novel, in 1683 : it was entitled " Eromena, or the Noble 
Stranger." Vide Langbaine and Jacob. 

WILLIAM, marquis of NEWCASTLE, who amHsed himself 
it this period with poetry and horsemanship, was, as a natural con- 
leqnence of his rank, much extolled as a poet. His poetical works, 
which consist of plays and poems, are very little regarded ; but his 
fine book of horsemanship is still in esteem. It was lately reprinted. 
Ob, 25 Dec. 1676. See the reign of Cham.es I. Class HI. 

SIR WILLIAM LOWER ; a small anonymous 
head; arms; motto, " Amico Rosa, Inimico Spina." 

Sir William Lower. W. Richardson. 

Sir William Lower, a noted cavalier, wrote and translated the 
following dramatic pieces : 1 . " The Phenix in Flames," a tragedy. 
2. " Polyeuctes, or the Martyr," a tragedy. 3. " Horatius," a 
tragedy, from the French of Comeille : this is better translated by 
Mrs. Philips. 4. " The Noble Ingratitude," a pastoral tragi- 
comedy, from Mons. Quiuault : to this is prefixed his head. 
5. " The Inchanted Lovers," a dramatic pastoral. 6. " The 
Amorous Phantasm," a tragi-comedy. AH these, except the first, 
were written during the Interregnum. He translated from the 
French the first and third tomes of the " Innocent Lady, or illustri- 
ous Innocence." The most considerable of the books published by 
him, are those two which relate to Charles the Second's reception 
and entertainment at the Hague. One of them was printed several 

joys spiritual exultations, my rest hope, ray peace a good conscience, and my ac- ' 
quiescence in Thee ! In Thee as the principle of truth, in thy word as the measure 
of. knowledge, in (by law aa the rale of lifo, in thy promise si the satisfaction uf 
tape, and in thy onion as the highest fniiiion of glory." 



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40 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

yean before the restoration, the other at that era. It is entitled, 
• " A Relation of Charles the Second's Voyage to, and Residence at 
the Hague, from the 25th of May to June 2, 1660," &c. Hag. 
Com. 1660. This is a translation from the French. 

FRANCIS GOLDSMITH, of Gray's Inn; a small 
oval. There is another head of him, without his name, 
engraved by Cros3; underneath are four verses : 
" His outward figure here you find,'' &c. 

Francis Goldsmith ; with the four verses. W. 
Richardson. 

Francis Goldsmith translated, from Grotius " Sophompaneas, or 
the History of Joseph," which he published with annotations, in tbc 
preceding reign. He also translated into English a. Catechism, 
written in Latin verse, by the same author. This was printed after 
the restoration.* He died at Ashton, in Northamptonshire, in Sep- 
tember, 1655. 

- JOHANNES QUARLES. FaUhorm f. 12m. 
This has been copied. 

Johannes Quarees; in an oval of bays; prefad 
to his "Poems;" \1mo. Marshall. 

Johannes Quarles; eight verses, "See here a 
Phasnir" fyc. 

John Quarles, who was one of the eighteen children of Francis 
Quarles, by Ursula his wife, bore a captain's commission in the 

* We hid lately t poet of the wine name with the person just mentioned ; f~ 
haps of the unie family, but by no means of the same character. His writing* 
general, are much esteemed ; but bis poetry i> greatly admired. Few tragedies to" 
been read with stronger emotion! nf pity, than the distressful scenes in hit " Vic* 
of Wakefield i" yet we cannot but regret, that the author of " The Traveller"* »W 
have undervalued his genius 10 far as to write a romance. 

t Dtciei repetila placebil. 



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OF ENGLAND. 41 

royal army, in the time of the civil war. Upon the decline of the " 
king's fortune, he retired to London in a necessitous condition, and 
applied himself to writing books for his support. His works are 
chiefly poems, in which he appears to be the poetical as well as the 
natural s«n of his father. He died of the plague in 1 665. See a 
detail of his works in the " Arhen. Oxon." 

GEORGE WITHER published a poem of many hundred lines, 
upon the report of the restoration of the parliament by General 
Monk, in 1659. It is entitled, " Furor Poeticus, i. e. Fropheticus, 
a Poetic Fhrensie." It is dated from Hambleton, and he tells us 
that it was meditated. 

,; lndoraopagi,recobani sub tepnine hgi." 

I shall conclude all I have to say of this everlasting rhymer, 
with two lines of Dryden, which comprehend his whole character 
as a poet : 

" He faggotted his notions as they fell, 
And if they rh ym'd and rattled, all m well."* 

See the two preceding reigns. 

HUGO CROMPTON, JEt. 18. A. ffertocks sc. 
YLrno. 

Hugo Crompton, gen. small Qvo. Before his 
" Pierides" <§-c. 1658. Thisprint represents him some- 
what older than the former, 

Hugo Crompton, gen. > W. Richardson. 

Hugh Crompton was a gentleman well educated, though but of 
small fortune. His necessities, as may be collected from his epistle 
to the reader, obliged bim to turn author. He published a volume 
of poems, entitled, "Pierides, or, the Muses Mount," out of which 
Wins tan] ey has given us a taste, as he calls it, of the brithtett of 

* Some extract! from hia works were published in small Ovo. not many years 
"go. The pious and very learned Dr. Lort, after having read them, observed, 
"lhat their perusal would teach him in future, not to trust to report for the character 
lit an author," The ivorki of Wither are, what we called at Eton, a good iharpivg 
<«*: sod poets by profession will find many sentiments, and many lines ready 
made, upon almost any subject, political, moral, or religious.— Lord IIiii.h. 
VOL. IV. G 



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42 BI0GKAP1 

Us Mutt i but I must coofeai 
specimen. He inform! us, tl 
paper, but that he after-wan 
He speaks thus of his " Mw 
my ramble, gathered this sa 
Helicon. But thou (reader) 
it with thy good conceit, if t 
supplied by the reader that b 
neglected. 

JOHN TATHAM. 

which two Cupids hold a 

are these verses : 

" Here is no schisme 
In every line a perl 
And love and beau 
Joy in their lovely 

John Tatham. W. 

" John Tatham " says Wii 
to bud with his youth, which 
together contemptible poetry 
in the following lines. The 

of Mourns, 



Of wit? 

Or does ih> amoroi 
(Beyond its merit' 
Ofpoetr oris'tc* 
Sucli slender wits ■ 

However strange it may scci 
things;" and, what is more 8 
He has been erroneously ( 
worthy fore-runner of Settle 
upon two lord mayors,* in 
rJit/Biet, and probably pieascc 
by Waller himself. He was 
were published before the re. 

• In the 



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44 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

A small whole length of a man, dressed like the gentry 
of this period, or the reign of Charles I. Over his head 
is the word NIM. It is in a small booh, called " The 
Life of a satyrical Puppy, called Nym,* who worrieth 
all those Satyrists he knows, and barks at the rest ; iy 
T. M." 1657. 

NYM and BUNGE; whole length; 4io.. scarce. 

It is probable that this whelp never " grew up to dog's estate ;"t 
and that, like other puppies, he was rather impertinent and teasing 
than formidable. I am equally a stranger to his real name and 
bis works. 

THOMAS PECKE, he. four Latin verses; "Aoni- 
dum juvenile decus," S;c. l2mo. 

Thomas Pecke, &c. W. Richardson. 

Thomas Pecke was a young gentleman of great expectation, who 
translated six hundred of Owen's " Epigrams" into English, while 
lie was at the Temple. They were printed with "Martial de Spec- 
taculis, or, Of the Rarities to be seen in Rome, and with the most 
select Epigrams of Sir Thomas More ; to which is annexed a Cen- 
tury of heroic Epigrams," &c These were published under the 
title of " Parnassi Puerperium, or some well Wishes to Ingenuity," 
1669; 8vo. Payne Fisher wrote " Epithalamium in Nuptiaseru- 
ditiss. juvenis, Thomte Pecke, de Spixford, Com. Norf. Armigen, 
et lecliss. Virginia, Lucia Ball, Filise spectatiss. Petri Ball, Eq. 



POETESSES. 

MRS. CATHARINE PHILIPS; a bust; inscribed 
Orinda. Faithornef. Frontispiece to her Works; folio. 



• Nym, 


rNira, seems to lie the diminutive of Nimrod, 




" A mighty hunter, and his prey »ai n 


jm also r 


eans, to match or steal; hence Nimmiug Ned 


t Prior. 





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ui'orva ^ceckcidum cUUceaata donuuj* 



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OF ENGLAND. 45 

Orinda Philips. J.Secketf. ito. mezz. 

There is a portrait of her at Strawberry-hill. 
Catharine, daughter of John Fowler, a merchant of London, and 
rife of James Philips, of the Priory of Cardigan, esq. was much 
ind deservedly esteemed for her poetical talents. She was styled, 
1 The matchless Orinda," and indeed shone without a rival among 
the female wits of her time. She was author of several poems, 
which are more to be admired for propriety and beauty of thought, 
than for harmony of versification, in which she was generally defi- 
cient. She translated the " Pompey" and " Horace" of Corneille, 
and is said to have been assisted in the former by Charles, lord 
Buckhurat and Mr. Waller.* " Pompey" was acted with applause 
in Ireland, and " Horace' 1 by persons of quality at court. Her 
Letters to Sir Charles Cotterel have been much admired, and are 
among the best of her works. Dr. Jeremy Taylor, who was her in- 
timate friend, has addressed his excellent " Letter on the Measures 
and Offices of Friendship" to her. Ob. June, 1664, Mt. 32. Her 
works were published after her decease, in 1667. 



MISCELLANEOUS AUTHORS IN DIVINITY, 
HISTORY, ANTIQUITIES, &c. 

JOHANNES PRIC.EUS. Persinsc. Prefixed to 
" Apuleii Metamorphoseos, Lib. XI. cum Notts, fyc. J. 
Priori, Gouda, 1650," 8vo. This head, which is well 
executed, is, in the copy of" Apukius" in my possession, 
placed immediately after the title. 

John Price; in a chair reading. J. Da.ncke.rts; 
W. Hollar; scarce. 

John Price, one of the first theological critics of his age, was 
educated at Christ Church, in the university of Oxford. Having 
embraced the religion of the church of Rome, he travelled into 
Italy with Mr, Howard, a son of the Earl of Arundel, and was af- 
terward retained in the service of the Earl of Strafford, when he 

• See " lloy.il ami Noble Aulliors," II. |). 98, 2d edit 



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46 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

was lord -lieu tenant of Ireland. Then it was that bis acquaintance 
commenced' with the celebrated primate Usher. In the time of the 
civil war, he wrote several pamphlets in defence of the king, for 
which he suffered a tedious imprisonment- Upon his enlargement, 
he retired to Florence, was made supervisor of the Grand Duke's 
medals, and was afterward, by that prince, appointed professor of 
the Greek language at Pisa. He was particularly eminent for his 
Commentaries on the Scriptures. His Notes on the Psalms and 
the New Testament are inserted entire, and by themselves, in the 
fifth tome of the " Critic! Sacri." The learned Dutch critic, John 
Alberti, spends eight chapters of his " Periculum Crttlcum" in 
strictures upon that work. He is said to have spent the latter part 
of his life in the convent of St. Angus tin, at Rome. Ob. cire. 
1676. 

EDWARD LEIGH, esq. M.A. of both universities, 

M. 48, 1650; four English verses. T. Cross sc. 

This gentleman was educated at Magdalen Hall, in Oxford, 
whence he removed to the Middle Temple, where he not only 
studied the common law, but divinity and history. The books 
which he published in the several faculties to which he applied 
himself, are an abundant proof of his great industry and extensive 
learning ; particularly his critical and theological works, the chief 
of 'which are his " Critica Sacra" on the Hebrew words of the Old, 
and the Greek of the New Testament, and his " Body of Divinity." 
He was representative for the town of Stafford , in the Long Parlia- 
ment, and was one of the members appointed by the commons to 
sit in the assembly of divines. Ob. 2 June, 1 67 1 , 

GULIELMUS HICKS, gen. M. 38, 1658. D. 

Loggan sc. 

" Though thou no prophet art, nor prophet's son, 
Without their spirit, this could ne'er be done. 
Though Brightman, Napier, Mede, are gone to rest, 
Their sprite yet lives redoubled in thy breast. 
Ye that have cast th' Apocalypse to ground, 
Because so dark, mysterious and profound, 
Why take it up again, and use this glass, 
'Twill then no longer for a nvyst'iy pass." 



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{^Tteuei rffau nofroftet art, ner Sflv/tieAr J<m^ 
r y9t$%u't t&fir Sfirtt,tfri.r scu/d ns're k dens 
( 7n0U£'6 Bngfatman, Kapeir, Medcarsevne fy /ts£q\ 
'yffttr cSp'rtte yet &utJ redoubled tit /&y Breast, 
yes' 't&at Save eajt ti'^Apoca/ypj tejrreund 
"iBecau/e- jo dark, mysterious, an&prefeund: 
°9ftby,taA;e ittfp ap-aine, and use t&ts Glalie, 
z/wi//$sn no longer /hr adfystrie ftasse. ~ 

FuHiih'd Jy TOiiehaidim 31. York Seosi Strand Jut, IIJOS. 

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OF ENGLAND. • « 

SiaetMiis Hicks, &c. W. Richardson: 

Hicks, who received his education in the university of 

took arms against the ' king -in the civil war, in which he 

captain's commission in the trained bands. He was author 

Practical Exposition on the Revelation," in folio, to which 

'several titles, with different dates, have been prefixed. The. 

ocalypse," like other things that are unintelligible, has been 

lined a hundred different ways, and the last exposition -has 

generally the most esteemed, especially if it has been adapted 

to the time when it was written. Ob. March, 1659-60. Vide " Allien, 

Oxon." 

ED. CHISENHALE, esq. presenting his book to a 
men standing at a church door; various emblematical 
fgures; small octavo. Frontispiece to his "History" 
Seven English vetses : 

'' Here to the church, one of her youngest sonneg," &e. 

Eo. Ghisenhale, esq. Copied from the above. 

Edward Chisenhale, a gentleman of Lancashire, who bore a 

Colonel's commission for the king in the civil war, well deserves to 

It remembered in the double capacity of a soldier and an author. 

of the garrison that with heroic bravery defended 

-house, whence he sallied forth, just .after the enemy had 

<ting of their provisions, and stole their dinner. He also, 

. dar address, drew the besiegers into a place where he cut 

|fihi(ndred of them, under a pretence that the house was open. 

Jo it was the occasion of bis being fined 800/. for delin- 

1 He was author of " A Catholic History, collected out «f 

ires, Councils, Fathers, &c. occasioned by Dr. Thomas 

iVbook, called The lost Sheep returned," 1653, small Svo.f 

FRANCISCUS ROUS, armig. Collegii Etonensis 
propositus, 1656, JEt.77. Faithorne sc. Before "The 

* See Lloyd's "Memorials," p. 690. Particulars of the siege ire in Peck'* 
" Desiderata Curioja," li. p. 42, &C. 
I V»b« was a convert lo popery. 



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48 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

Works of Francis Rous, Esq. or Treatises and Medita- 
tions dedicated to the Saints, and to the excellent through- 
out the three Nations;" fat. 1657. 

Francis Rous; four English verses, "Adam tht 
jirst this Image claymes as his " &;c. W.Richardson; 4fo. 

Fhancis Rous; in the " Oxford Almanack " 1744. 

There is an original portrait of him, with a mace, as speaker 01 
the House of Commons, in the provost's lodge at Eton College. 
He was provost there in 1643. 

Francis, son of Sir Anthony Rous, of Halton, in Cornwall, wai 
burgess for Truro, in that county, in the reign of Charles I. He 
was a vehement decl aimer in parliament against the innovations and 
abuses in church and state ; and particularly against Arminianisra, 
which he represented as popery in disguise. He was one of the 
few laymen appointed by the commons to sit in the assembly of 
divines at Westminster.* His religious and political principles were 
perfectly accommodated to the party which he espoused, and seen 
to have ever varied with his interest, which appears to have bad i 
much stronger hold upon him than his enthusiasm. He was ap- 
pointed speaker of Barebone's parliament; and made a wild pro- 
posal to form the English commonwealth after the model of ths 
Jewish. But as a theocracy was rejected, he thought fit to invasl 
.the regal power in Cromwell, whom he affected to look upon as I 
compound of the characters of Moses and Joshua, He was oaeq 
those who were called by the Protector to the upper house: and J 
was said " that he could not well do less than make that gentlerosj 
a lord, who had made him a prince,*' by the resignation of the ioj 
strument of government into his hands. He was called " the 1 
literate Jew of Eton ;" but it does not at all appear, from hi 
writings, that he deserved that appellation. Ob. 7 Jan. 1658-1 
See more of him in Lord Clarendon's " History of the Rebellion.1 

JOHANNES SPARROW, &c. D.Loggan^ 
et sc. 1659. In the upper part of the print aret* 

* He was said to lime entered into holj orders ; bat of this there is « 
See"Atben. Ojon." 



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Sir Geo* Strode. 

Fuhiwh'd /S/0. by ItfrThcharefao t HorfcHh u.-e Jtr-ano 



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OF ENGLAND. 49 

semi-circles full of strange lines and figures, and joined 
together by a heart, with this inscription, " The Wonder- 
Eye of Eternity, explained by Jacob Behm. in the 40 
Questions of the Soul ;" Ato. 

John Sparrow, a barrister of the Iniier Temple, translated " The 
high and deep Searching out of the Life of Man," and several others 
of the numerous works of Jacob Behmen, a German cobbler," and .a - 
celebrated enthusiast. Mr. Law, who -was also a translator of his 
writings, and many other persons, have lately helped to bring this 
profound author into vogue, f The mystical divinity of Behmen 
may be compered to a cloudy sky in winter weather ; in which the 
same cloud which one fancies to resemble a lion, another shall fancy 
to be like S bear, and a third a horse. Mr. Law imagined, that Sir 
Isaac Newton took the first hint of his philosophy from Behmen's 
divinity ; another, that there is a close analogy betwixt that and 
electricity; and it is very probable that some of his readers have 
as clearly discovered in it the vortices of Des Cartes. 

SIR HENRY VANE deserves to be ranked in the first class of 
mystics, as he is little less profound than Jacob Behmen himself. 
We are amazed that a man, whose genius carried him so far above 
the common level of mankind in his public character, should sink so 
far below common sense in his writings. Don Quixote is supposed 
to have spoken like a philosopher upon every thing but knight- . 
errantry ; so did Sir Henry Vane upon any thing but religion. He, 
as well as every other ridiculous broachcr of heterodoxies, had 
many followers-! See the reign of Charles I. Class V. 

SIR GEORGE STRODE ; a small oval; in the 
title to his translation (from the Spanish) of Fonseca's 
"Holy Love;" 1652j \2mo. 

'Some My that he wu a cow- keeper till he w abont twenty-live je«J» of age, 
■bm he suddenly fancied himself inspired. 

t There are not myaleiiea enough in religion to exercise the active faith of some 
*a!oti, who cannot be satisfied without adding new oses, till the j are lost in the 
darkness of enthusiasm. But, as the; always fancy ttiemsel vsi under the imme- 
diate direction of Heaven, they then think they are most enlightened ; and believe 
that that faith which can " remove mountains," can also discover divine truth in 



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GO BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

Sir George Strode; oval ; in a square frame. W. 

Richardson. 

I have seen another book, published by this gentleman, namely, 
" The Anatomie of Mortalitie, written by George Strode, utter Bar- 
rister of the Middle Temple, for his own private Comfort," &c. 
second edition, 1632; 4to. 

Sir George Strode, a worthy benefactor to the church and poor, 
died 1603/ and was buried in St. James's church. Clerk en well. 

GULIELMUS SANbERSONUS, J&.6B, 1668. 

Stmt p.* Faithornesc. Frontispiece to his "Graphice;' 
fol. 

Guuelmus Sandersonvs, JEt. 68, 1658; by Fai- 
thorne, but without the name of painter or engrave?: 

William Sanderson was some tune secretary to George Viltiers, 
the first duke of Buckingham of that name. He distinguished him- 
self by bis loyalty to Charles I. in the time of the civil war, and 
was a great sufferer in the royal cause. He was author of " A com- 
plete History of Mary, Queen of Scotland, and her son King James 
Of Great Britain ;" The History of King James of Great Britain;" 
and " The History of King Charles I. from his Cradle to his Grave." 
The first of these was written in answer to Wilson's " Life of King 
James," to which it is inferior in every respect. This author, as 
appears by his " Graphice," was better qualified to write on paint- 
ing, than to compile histories; All his historical works are more or 
less deficient in style, in method) and correctness. Dr. Heylin, in 
his " Esamen Historicum," has been very free, perhaps too severe, 
in his censures upon his writings: and Bishop Kennet has been at 
least as rigid a censor, in his Notes on Arthur Wilson's " Life and 
Reign of James 1."+ Our author Sanderson was knighted soon 
after the restoration, and made a gentleman of the king's bed-cham- 
ber. Ob. 1676. 

, * The firM i mpresiiom arc those which wen nude before the name of the psiolcr 
t See Kennef ■ " Complete HiiU" ii. p. 663. 



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J 



OF ENGLAND. SI 

JAMES HOWELL, esq. in a cloak, leaning against 
a tree; whole length; motto, "Hie tutus obumbror." 
Mellan and Basse sc. Before his " German Diet," 8gc. 
and also before his " Londinopolis ;** folio. There is an- 
other impression with arms, but it is hatched.* There is 
a small head of him before his Letters, engraved by 
Marshall. 

James Howell, son of Thomas Howell, minister of Abernant, in 
Caermarthensliire, was master of more modern languages, and au- 
thor of more books, than any other Englishman of his time.f In 
the reigns, of James and Charles I. he was employed in many agen- 
cies in foreign parts. In 1627, he was chosen one of die represen- 
tatives in parliament for the town of Richmond, in Yorkshire; and 
in 1640, succeeded Sir Edward Nicholas as clerk of the council. 
In the time of the civil war, he was committed a close prisoner to 
the Fleet, where he continued for many years. The greatest part 
of his works were written for his support during his confinement ; 
and he indeed appears, in several of his hasty productions, to have - 
been more anxious to satisfy his stomach, than to do justice to his 
fame. His " Dodoua's Grove," which was published in the reign 
of Charles I. gained him a considerable reputation. But of all his 
performances, his Letters are the most esteemed ; though, as Mr. 
Wood justly observes, many of them were never written till he was 
in prison. But this censure does not affect his Letters to the Earl 
of Strafford, in the first volume of that lord's Papers, none of which 
are in the "Epistoja? Ho-r3iaBse." Upon the restoration of CharlesII. 
he was appointed historiographer royal, which office was created 
for him. He continued in it till his death, which happened in No- 
vember, 1666. His life and character may be sew in his letters, 
which abound with anecdotes. 

HENRICUS dom. CARY, baro de Lepington, 
com. de Monmouth, &c. W. Marshall f. Before his 

* Bj hatching in meant engraving with cross linei (but ninslly produce the snides, 
which, in Mcllio'i prims, are generally cauaerl by stronger and bolder strokes of 

t Cibber, in his" Litis of the Poets," iaj«, that be published no less than forty- 
nine ; but the wither of his Lite, in the " Biugraphia," hu not reckoned up half thaf 



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32 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

translation of Senault's " Use of the Passions" 1649; 

Hen. Do. Cart, (vel. Carey), baro de Leppington, 
comes Monniouthensis, et hon™'. ord. Balnea; eques. 
Faithornef Before his translation of Boccalims " Ad- 
vertisements from Parnassus;" fot. 1656. There is 
another head of Mm before his translation of Cardinal 
Jkntivoglid's " History of the Wars in Flanders;" fol. 
1654. 

.Henry Carey, earl of Monmouth ; from an origi- 
nal at Strawberry-hill; in " Noble Authors" by Air. 
Park. 

Henry Carey, earl of Monmouth, was grandson to Henry, lord 
Hunsdon,* cousin-german to Queen Elizabeth. He was, in his 
tender age, educated with the Duke of York, afterward Charles the 
First. 1 Before be entered upon his travels, he received this admo- 
nition from Charles : " Be always doing something while you are 
abroad." It appears that he acted in conformity to that prince's 
advice, as he returned home a complete master of the languages of 
those countries through which he travelled. He was a great suf- 
ferer by the civil war, particularly by the death of his son, a young 
gentleman of great hopes, who was killed at Marston-Moor. But 
while some of the nobility were actually embroiled in this war, and 
others were miserable from the effects of it, the Earl of Monmouth 
enjoyed the calm pleasures of a studious retirement. He composed 
nothing of his own ; but translated from Malvezzi, Bentivoglio, 
Parula, Biondi, &c. no less than seven folios, two octavos, and a 

* HI* ion. Sir Robert Carey, father of Henrj, ind the first earl of Monmouth, 
distinguished himself by riding near three hundred mile* in less than three days, 
when he Kent from Loadon to Edinburgh, (b inform King Janet of the death of 
Queen Elizabeth. He bad several falls end sore bruises on the road, which occa- 
sioned his going battered and bloody into the royal presence.J 

t Liu jd, in his " Memoirs," p. 650, tayt, that Si. Robert Carey, his father, was 
tutor to Charles; but he is mistaken. See what he was to him, in the " Memoir* of 
the Life of the Earl of Monmouth," p. 165. 176. 178. 

t See " Hit Majesties (King Juki's) Entertainment from Scotland to London," 
p. S and 3. 



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OF ENGLAND. 53 

odecimo. See the " Catalogue of Royal and Noble Authors." 
>. 13 June, 1661, 2Et. 65. He lies buried iu the church of Rick- 
uisworth, in Hertfordshire. Some notices of him may be col- 
:ted from {he inscription on bis tomb. 

ROBERTUS STAPYLTONUS, eques auratus, 
c. W. Marshall/. Before his translation of Strada 
De Hello Belgico," 1650; fol. 

Sir Robert Stapyl ton translated from the Latin, Strata's " History 
' the Belgic War;" which is the worst work of that author, and 
le best of Sir Robert s ; as indifferent prose is preferable to indif- 
:rent verse. See the reign of Charles I. Class IX. 

JOHN PAWLET (otPowlet), marquis of Winchester, famous 
ir his defence of Basing-house, translated from the French, "The 
lallery of heroic Women," 1652 ; and Talon's " Holy History," 
653 ; 4to. See the reign of Charles I. Class HI. 

ROBERTUS MENTETHUS,* a Salmoneto, 
Scotus. i*. Mignardp. Roma, 1656. R, Lochon sc. 
1661 ; band, eloak, and coif. Under the oval are these 
fines: 

Hie est quern legis et stupes legendo, 

To to nobilis orbe Salmonetus. 

Ilium, inter scopulos et iliceta, 

Sub cceli genuit rigentis axe 

Horrens Scotia tristibus pruinis ; 

Ne tu forte putes fuisse Galium, 

Facundos, lepidos, et elegantes 

Toto nobilis orbe Salmoneti 

Qui " GuIIqs" legis et stupes libellos. 

" JEgid. Menagius." 
This inscription is at p. 120 of Menage's "Poems," the 8th 
«ditkm, Amsterdam, 1687, where is also the following epigram, 
■which contains all that 1 know of his character : — 

' Sometimes written Monti- thus. He is placed here as a Scottish historian. He 
"'! chaplain to Cardinal de Bed, who speaks very favourably of bim. 



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54 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

lb Librot Htstoriarum Britannicarara Roberti MoAtetn, 
Salmoneti. 
Aspcra dumosis genuit quern Scotia sylvis, 
Quern blando ezcepit Gallia culta sinu ; 
En voluit grates, genti devinctus utrique, 
Et potuit dignas pendere Mon tetius. 
Gallorum lingua, seclis memoranda futuris, 
Scotorum scripsit fortia facta ducum. 

ROBERTUS MONTEITH. Des Rockers. 

1 do Dot remember to have seen any of this author's writings 
quoted, except his " History of Great Britain.'' 

GULIELMUS DUGDALE, JEt. 50, 1656. Hollar 
sc. Frontispiece to his "History of Warwickshire ;" fol.l 

Sir William Dugdale. J. Burcfte; Ato. InDalA 
laway's " Heraldic Inquirer " 1793. 

Sir William Dugdale. P.Rothwelt, 1812; » 
Malcolm's " Lives of Antiquaries." 

William Dugdale, who was the most laborious and 1 judicious an- 
tiquary of his age, has rescued from oblivion an infinite number 
of curious and useful records relating to the history and antiquities 
of his own country. His " Monasticon Anglicanum," in three vo- 
lumes folio, in which Roger Dodsworth had a large share, contains 
an account of the ancient religious orders of monks and friar*, of 
the foundations of monasteries, and cathedral and collegiate 
churches. His "History of Warwickshire" shews how histories 
of particular districts should be written. His " History of imbank- 
ing and draining the Fens," which was the most estimable of hie 
performances, is compiled with great accuracy and judgment. But 
his " Baronage," the first genealogical history of our nobility, it 
not so accurate as the rest of his compilations ; though it hat its 
merit.* His "History of St. Paul's Cathedero);" his "Origines 

* Mr. Chailcs Hornby, clerk of tbe Pipe-office, published in inonymcas ocUn 
pimpblet, in 1738, with tliii title : " Three Letters, containing Remaifca on M> 



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OF ENGLAND. 55 

idicales," and several other works, are in (heir kind equally 
ualtle : and his books in general are of special use to the readers, 
well as the writers of English history. It is remarkable, that 
publication of the " Monasticon" was productive of niany law- 
(8, by the revival of old writings; and that the Puritans were 
;hly offended at it, as they looked upon it as a large step towards 
roducing popery.* Ob. 10 Feb. 1685-6. 

ELIAS ASHMOLE, Mercuriophilus Anglicus. 
tfore his " Fasciculus Chemicus" 

Elias Ashmole. Faithornesc. a bust ; Ato. Fai- 
lorae was paid 71. for engraving this head. 

Elias Ashmole; copied from Faithorne by Michael 
T (mdergucht. Before the " Antiquities of Berkshire" 

w.f 

Elias Ashmole, together with the head of Lilly 
he Astrologer. J. Lodge sc. Before their lives and 
hat of Charles I. 1774, 8t». 

Elias Ashmole. W. Richardson. 

Elias Ashmole. Stowsc. From an original picture 
h Malcolm's " Lives of Antiquaries ;" Ato. 

Elias Ashmole, whom Mr. Wood styles " the greatest virtuoso 
■td curioso that was ever known or read of in England," had a 
wppy facility in learning every art or science to which he applied 

if the numberless Errort ind Defects, in. Dogdale'a Bin>mgc" Mr. Hearne, 

■Bring mentioned the " Baronage," in ■ note on p. 351 of " Lib. Nig. Scaccarii," 

Hills: "Specimen satis ainpluin crrorura DugdaliaDoruiu in libellum, memoriie 

■an, retulit Antonim Wood, opueulom ia Muko Aabnralianb adcemum, non- 

■K.tttem in lucem edilnni." 

p Wsrton'l " life of Dr. Bathunt," p. 148. Il is alio observable, that (hi) 

Kg almost the only one of oar books that finds a ready admittance into the libra- 

Bt of monks, haa rendered il scarce. 

H'We are informed, al p. 81 of his " Diary," that be" sat for a second pictore (o 

PiRjtey." I haTe teen neither of Iheae portraits. 



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66 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

himself. He studied astrology, botany, chemistry, heraldry, and 
antiquities ; in all which he was a great proficient. In the latter 
end of the reign of Charles I. he retired to the pleasant village of 
Engiefield, in Berkshire, where he amused himself with botany. 
The time he spent in this delicious retirement appears to have been 
the happiest part of his life. In 1650, he published, under tie 
feigned name of James Hasolle, esq. his" Fasciculus Chenticos,or 
Chemical Collections, expressing the Ingress, Progress, and Egress, 
of the secret Hermetic Science," Ac. 12mo. His " Theatrnm che- 
micum Britannicum," published in 4to. 1652, contains many pieces 
of our old hermetic philosophers. This work gained him a consi- 
derable reputation, which was very much increased by his laborious 
and accurate " History of the Order of the Garter," published in 
folio, 1672.* He has not taken proportionable pains in his "An- 
tiquities of Berkshire," which might have been much more com- 
plete. He enjoyed several lucrative places under the government, 
in the reign of Charles II. It is well known that he, in his lifetime 
founded the Museum at Oxford, which bears his name. 06. 
18 May, 1692, Mt. 76. 

GULTELMUS BURTON, LL. Baccalaureos. 
Hollar; in an oval; holding a book ; small folio. 

William Burton was some time usher to Thomas Farnaby, * 
famous schoolmaster in Kent, and was himself afterward a school 
master at Kingston-upon-Thames. When he was at the university, 
he was patronised by the very learned Mr. Allen, of Gloucester-hall, 
who appointed him Greek lecturer there. He had the honour of 
speaking a funeral oration upon the death of that excellent person, 
which was much applauded for its propriety and elegance. He 
wrote annotations upon the first of Clement's epistles, in English, 
and histories of the Greek and Persian tongues, in Latin; both 
which were published in 1657. His principal work is his leaned 
Commentary on "Antoninus his Itinerary, or Jouraies of the Roman 

* He infonni ns himself, that be made in expensive ud laborious collection M 
nateriaUfor the "live* of the Companions of the Order of the Garter."! The* 
tie probably in the Museum at Oxford. See Aostis's " Register of (he Girt"." 
•o!. ii. p. 150. 

t « HUt* p. 643. 



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OF ^NGLAl^D. 67 

Empire, so far as it eonceroeth Britain," 1658 ; fol. to which, is pre- 
fixed his head. At page 136 of this book, he gives some account 
pf his family, and tells ua that his great-grandfather expired with 
excess of joy, upon his being informed of the death of Queen 
Mary. Ob. 28 Dec 1657. 

RICHARDUS KILBURNE, Topographic Can- 
tianae author, M. 52, 1657. T. Cross sc. 

Richard Kilburne. J. Cook sc. 1812; in Mal- 
colm's " Lives of Antiquaries ;" 4to. 

This person was author of the " Survey of Kent," 1659; 4to. 
Several of our greatest antiquaries speak of his book as modern 
and superficial, and consequently of small value. See p. 45 of 
Kennel's " Life of Somner," before the second edition of that au- 
thor's "Treatise of Gavelkind," 1726, 4to. ; and p. 15, of the 
second edition of " Nicolson's Historical Library," 1714 j folio. 

JOHN GREAVES ; inscribed, "Effigies Johannis 
Gravii" A. D. 1650. E. M. fee* 

This eminent mathematician and antiquary was master, in a high 
degree, of the natural and acquired qualifications which were neces- 
sary to extend those branches of science to which he applied him- 
self. He was educated at Baliol College, in Oxford, from which 
he removed to Merton. He was afterward, on the foot of his great 
merit, chosen geometry professor of Gresharn College. His ardent 
thirst of knowledge soon carried him into several parts of Europo, 
where he eagerly seized every Opportunity of improving it. His 
next voyage was into the Eastern countries ; where nothing re- 
markable in the heavens, earth, or even subterranean places, seems 
to have escaped his nice observation. He, with indefatigable in- 

* la the improved copj of Ward's " Lives of the Greibarn Profeuora," in the 
Briliih Museum, under John Goes yes, at p. 153, is the following additional para- 
graph: " The Reverend Mr. Edward Brawncgreat-grandion of Dr. Tbornai Grwves.t 
and rector of Walcsby, in Lincolnshire , has the head of Mr. John Greaves, etched 
W a copper-plate ; several copies of which ha sc been printed off at the cipeuse of 
the Reverend Dr. Thomaa Birch."— MS. 

t Brother to John. 



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58 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

tlustry, and at the peril of his life, collected a considerable rruraber 
of Arabic, Persic, and Oreek manuscripts for Archbishop Land. 
Of these he well knew the value, as he was a master of the lan- 
guages in which they were written. He also collected for that 
prelate many oriental gems and coins.* - He took a more accurate 
survey of the pyramids than any traveller who went before him. 
On bis return from the East, he visited several parts of Italy a 
second time. During his stay at Rome, he made a particular in- < 
quiry into the true state of the ancient weights and measures. Soon 
after he had finished his second voyage, he was chosen Savi&an 
professor of astronomy at Oxford. He was eminently qualified for 
his professorship, as the works of ancient and modern astronomers 
were familiar to hira. His books relating to oriental learning, hb 
" Pyramidographia, or a Description of the Pyramids in Egypt," 
his " Epocbse Celebriores," and other curious and useful pieces, 
of which Dr. Ward has given us a catalogue,* shew him to have 
been a great man. ; Those which he intended to publish would 
have shewn him to be a greater; but he was stopped in his career 
by death, the 8th of October, 1652, in the 50th year of his age. 

JONAS MOORE, M. 35. 1649. H. Stone p. 
T. Cross sc. small. 

Jonas Moobe. iV. Yeates. 

Jonas Moore, JEt.45; prefixed to his "Arith- 
metic," 1660; 8«o. 

' Jonas Moore; reading; 4to. 

- Jonas Moore, one of the most eminent mathematicians of his 
age, was born at Whitlee, t in Lancashire. He had a strong pro- 
pensity to mathematical studies from his childhood, and in the early 
part of his life taught the mathematics in London for his support 
He was employed by the commissioners for draining and dividing 
the fens ; and in his survey took notice that the sea made a curve 

■ ■ He. ringed the coini, which (be archbishop presented to the unirenilj. tn their 
proper order, and vu appointed keeper of them. 

t See Ward'i " Li<ei of the prufessois of Gresbam College." 

t Spelt Whitlt, in Spelnun'i •• Villarc Anglican." 



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OF ENGLAND. ;59 

.line on the beach, from which he took the hint to keep it effectually 
out of Norfolk. This added much to his reputation. Mr. Aubrey 
informs us, that he made a model of a citadel, for Cromwell to 
bridle the city of London, which wa»in the possession of Mr. Wild ; 
and that this citadel was to have been the cross-building of St. 
Paul's chureh.* He patronised the famous Mr. Flamsteed, who 
had but a very scanty subsistence at Cambridge when he took him 
under his protection. He and Sir Christopher Wren are said to 
'have persuaded Charles II. to build the Observatory at Greenwich, 
in which Flamsteed was placed. He was the first Englishman that 
composed a " System of the Mathematics," which was published in 
two volumes 4to. 1681. He was knighted by Charles II. who ap- 
pointed him surveyor-general of the ordnance. Sixty pieces of 
artillery, equal to .the number of his years, were discharged at the 
Tower at his funeral. Ob. Aug. 1679.f See more of him in Birch's 
' " History of the Royal Society," vol. iv. p. 106. 

GTJLIELMUS BAGWELL, M, 66, 1659; sir 

■ English verses ; copied, 

" la traffic first his youthful time he spent, 
And over seas to foreign countries went : 
But nature crossed, him there, knowing his parts 
Were destined rather to improve the arts : 
His serious hours on them, his hours of leisure, 
. Elsewhere the first, the next here brings you pleasure." ' 

William Bagwell was author of " The Mystery of Astronomy 
made easy to the meanest Capacity," 1655 ; 8vo. His portrait Is 
prefixed to a small 12mo. book, entitled " Wits Extraction, con- 
veyed to the. Ingenious in Riddles, Observations and Morals, "com- 
posed by W. B. Truth's Servant, J 664." On the back of the portrait 
is printed a curious group of a family seated at table as. ah evening 
party; with an explanation, engraved by JjChantry. Bagwell-was a 
■prisoner for debt, in 1637, and wrote a poem upon his sufferings in 
1644. . .'..-> 

" ^3. in the " Ash mo lean Musenm," whence the above sccount of him is chiefly 
Ukeo. Mr. Aubrey conclude the short skclcl. of too history with spying, " that 
Ittvu »^oodrn»tbemiittei»n, spde.goodfeUow." ; 

t Alhmole'i " Diary." 



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60 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

JAMES HARRINGTON, esq. &c. from an ori- 
ginal picture in the possession of John Hudson, esq. of 
Bessingby, in Yorkshire. Marchif. h.sh. tnezz. 

James Harrington, esq- &typ< Hollar f. 
arms; 1658; 4fo. 

Sir James 
thorne sc. Ato. 

James Hai 

James Hai 

This political r. 
" The Commonv 
plan for an everlt 
kept up by rotatic 
is, in many instan 
aa the " Republic 
who waa a great 
it put in executioi 
levelled at this pi 
a great contempt 
a serious answer 
cavalier manner, 
editions of Hard 
.06. 11 Sept. 1671 

ROBERT 

cidajnant" Ft 
before his " L 

Robert Loved? 
patra," and autln 
were in good esti 

upper servant in Lord C.'s family, at Nottingham, at the time of the 
Interregnum. There is a familiar openness in hie lettem, which 
intimates that the author never intended they should be made 
public. 



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OF ENGLAND. 61 

HENRY MASSINGBERD. Cross sc. h, sk. 
opted by W. Richardson, 

This person Was author of a folio, entitled, "Council and 
Imouitioa to his Children;" Lend. 1656; to which his print is 

Several authors on music in die next Class. 

TtTCHARDUS ELTON, generosus Bristol, nee 
.on artis militaris magister, Ann. 1649, JEt. 39. J. 
r )roeskout sc. h. sk. 

Under the print are eight verses, which I shall transcribe, as 
bey may serve as a specimen of the encomiums which have been 
ormerly lavished upon authors, whose works are now used' for 
raste paper. 

" If Rome unto her conqa'ring Cssors raise 
llicti obelisks, to crown their deathless praise ; 
"Wttot miiijuicenl to thee must Albion rear. 
To shew thy motion in a brighter spliero ? . 
This art's too dull to do't; 'lis only done 
Beit by thyself: >o lights the world the snn. 
We may admire thy face, the sculptor's art. 
Bat we are extasy'd at th* inward pari." 

Richard Elton was author of " A complete Body of the Art 
Military, being plain and perfect Directions for the ordering and 
framing of an Army, both of Morse and Foot : together with the 
Mariner of Fortifications, and the Art of Gunnery t" fol. to which 
his head is prefixed. I find byClavel's " Catalogue," that this 
Wc was reprinted after the restoration. I need not inform the 
reader, that the art of war has been almost totally changed since 
ti» publication of this work. 

WILLIAM BAR1FF, or BaUikfe, M. 35; pre- 
fixed to "Military Discipline," 1643 ; ito. Glover. 

William Bariffe, jEf. 42 ; prefixed to the same. ' 

William Babiff; in armour; sash, fyc. Ip 

| Ricrqft. 



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v62 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

WILLIAM BARIFFE, who, in the year 1642, was a major in 
Col. Hamden's regiment, * flourished during the Interregnum. He 
was author of a book of " Military Discipline," oF which there have 
been several editions. The last edition was, I think, printed in 
folio, 1661. 

RIC. RAWLYNS. R. Gaywoodf. 1656 ; copied. 

This person, who styles himself " Professor of Arithmetic ia 
Great Yarmouth," wag author of a practical treatise on that art, 
published in 1656, 8 vo. before which is the head above described, 
engraved much in the manner of Hollar, of whom Gay wood wisi 
disciple and imitator. 

THOMAS WILLSFORD, M.4G. R. Vaughansc. 
Under the print are/our verses, signed M. Boteler. 

Thomas Willsford was author of a book in 8vo , called " Nature's 
Secrets, or the History of the Generation of Meteors," 1658; which 
he dedicates to the Lady Stafford, sister to Lord Henry Stafford. 
At the conclusion he signs himself "her affectionate kinsman" 
M. Boteler, whose name is affixed to the lines at the bottom of die 
print, addresses a long copy of verses to his honoured uncle, upon 
his book of meteors. Thomas Willsford was also author, of * 
" Treatise of Arithmetic," in 8vo. His head, by Vaughan, is pre- 
fixed to both his books. Cocker, Leybourn, Hill, and others, hate 
much improved the art of arithmetic, since the two last- mentioned 
authors wrote on that subject, 

._■ WILLIAM LILLY, student in astrology. Hollar/. 
\1mo. 

William Lilly, St. 57. Hollar f. 

William Lilly, student in astrology; copied 
from Hollar. 

William Lilly ; prefixed to his " Ephemeris," 
1650. 

* Sec the " Lilt of the Arraiei," published in 1643. 
D,gil zed by GOOgle 



' OF ENGLAND. 63 

William Lilly; do. R.Gaywood. 

"William Lilly; oval; do. Marshall. 

William Lilly; half length; sitting at a table; 
to his " Christian Astrology" Marshall. 

William Lilly ; to his " Epkemeris" R. Vaughan. 

William Lilly; in an oval ; between Cardan and 
Guido; four verses. 

In the Asbmolean Museum is his portrait, which was the pro- 
perty of the founder. It may be depended upon for the likeness. 

William Lilly was a native of Discworth, in Leicestershire. He 
was, for several years, in the condition of a servant ; but having 
the good luck to marry his master's widow, with a fortune of 1000/. 
he applied himself to die study of astrology. He made so great a 
proficiency, that in seven or eight weeks he perfectly understood 
how to set a figure. He intimates, that there was something su- 
pernatural in the progress he made in this art; as he tells ns, that 
" he prayed for several weeks to those angels who were thought 
and believed by wise men to teach and instruct in all the several 
liberal sciences." * In 1647, he finished his book called " Christian 
Astrology;" but has not any where signified that the angels lent 
him their assistance in that work ; nor does it appear that there is 
any thing in it more than the author himself was well able to per- 
form, f It is very certain that he regarded judicial astrology as a 
science ; and it is .no less certain that he prostituted his pen to tha 
political purposes of the parliament and of Cromwell, J Astrolo- 
gical predictions and prophecies were perfectly suited to the enthu- 
siasm of these times ; and Lilly well knew how to apply them to 

* He sayq, that " the angels very rarely speak to any operator or master; and 
•ben they do speak, it is like the Irish, much in the throat.'' — Lilly's " Life," by 
himself, p. Btl, lnatedit. 

t There is before this book a good head of the author, by Marshall. 

1 " When Cromwell was in Scotland, a soldier stood with Lilly's (Merlinui) 
AnglicuB in his hand, and said, as Ihe several troops passed by him, ' Lo hear what 
Lilly sailh. you are promised victory, fight it out, brave boys ;' and then read that 
awnib's prediction.'* — " Life," p. 83. 



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64 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

the hope* and Tears of the populace. He was frequently ambigaom I 
and oracular, and sometimes amused the people with hieroglyphics; 
many of which, ai we are told by Mr. Aubrey, he stole from an old 
monkish manuscript. Moore, the almanack -maker, has stolen se- 
veral from him ; and there is no doubt but some future almanack- 
maker will steal them from Moore. Ob. June 9, 1681.* 

JOHN BOOKER; oval; in a cloak; a book in his 
hand; anonymous; scarce. 

John Booker, JEi. 46 ; small. 

John Booker. Hollar f. \2mo. 

John Booker was bred a haberdasher ; f but quitted this em- 
ployment, and followed that of a writing-master, at Hadley, in 
Middlesex. He in a few years rendered himself so eminent, that 
be was appointed licenser of mathematical boobs ; under which 
were included all those that related to the celtttial sciences. Lilly 
tells us, that he once thought him the greatest astronomer in the 

■ ■ Lilly, though knows to be «n impostor.t bad, however, a pension of 10DL 
a year conferred on him by (he council of state. The royalists treated him 
with ridicule and contempt. He is the Sidrophel of Butler : and Sir John Birken- 
head, in hii "Paul's Church-Ynrd,"$ satirizes bis almanack, where he mention) 
" Mr rlinui Aaglieus, the Art of discovering all that never was, and all that new 
shall be." Gntaker, who well knew the futility of his art. calls him " blind bin- 
jaid-"H He seems to have been checked by no scruples in promoting the rebellion; 
and indeed tells us himself, that be " engaged body and soul in the cause of (he 
parliament.''^ 

The Life of Lilly, by himself, together with bis life of Charles I. and that of lib 
friend Ashmole, written by that author by way of diary, have, as tbey were become 
Very scarce, been lately repuhliahed by Thomas Davies. "A full Answer to • 
confused mixture of false, traiterous, and contradictory Observations on the life 
Hid Actions of .the late King Charles, published by William Lilly, in July, 1651." 
is one of the" Historical Discourses" of Sir Edward Walker, 1705, fol. 

t So Lilly informs us ; bnt Mr. Wood says, that he was bred a clerk under aa 
alderman of London : this alderman was probably a haberdasher. 

J See Thnrloe's " State Papers," v. 451. 

§ This pamphlet is a facetious satire upon various books well known at Ibis lime, 
and supposed to be sold in St. Paul's Church-yard. 

|| Ga taker's Notes on the Id Verse of the X. Chapter of Jeremiah, in the "As- 
sembly's Annotations." 

t Lilly's "Life," p. *5. 



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OP ENGLAND. 65 

world ; bat it appears that he afterward sunk in his esteem, and 
that he thought himself a much greater man. We are told by the 
same author, that " he had a curious fancy in judging of thefts, 
and as successful in resolving love questions," which was a capital 
branch of his trade. George Wharton, who was formerly one of 
his astrological friends, had a great quarrel with him, which occa- 
sioned hia publishing, " Mercurio-ccelico Mastix ; or an Anti-caveat 
to all such as have heretofore had the misfortune to be cheated and 
deluded by that great and traiterons impostor, John Booker; in an 
Answer, to his frivolous Pamphlet, entitled, Mercurius Ccelicus, or 
a Caveat to all the People of England;" Oxon. 1644; 4to. The 
only work of Booker, worth the reader's notice, is his " Bloody 
Irish Almanack," which contains some memorable particulars rela- 
tive to the war in Ireland. Ob. April, 1667. 

CAPTAIN GEORGE WHARTON ; six verses, 
" Here the true Counterfeit" £?c. This print may be 
placed in the preceding reign. 

George Wharton; six verses, "Wise Nature" 8$c. 

George Wharton, by Faithorne; she verses, " Who 
views," 8$c. 

George Wharton was descended from a genteel family in West- 
moreland. He spent the greatest part of his patrimony in the service 
of Charles I. for whom he raised a fine troop of horse, which he 
commanded in person. When he could no longer keep the field, 
he retired to his studies, which he pursued with uncommon appli- 
cation ; particularly that of astrology, to which he had a strong and 
early propensity. His progress iu this art was suitable to his pas- 
sion for it; and he was looked upon by the royalists as equal, at 
least, to Lilly and Booker, of whom he was the rival and antagonist. 
He wag author of Almanacks, Mercuries, and several astronomical 
pieces. We are indebted to him for a chronology of the battles, 
sieges, and other remarkable occurrences of the civil war, since 
printed, with many additions, in the " Historian's Guide," and of 
late years in Salmon's " Chronological Historian." He had a 
knack of versifying, which he exercised in little sallies of drollery 
and satire, which arc interspersed with his astrological works. 

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06 BIOGRAPHICAL HrSTORY 

Upon the restoration he was appointed treasurer and paymaster 
of the ordnance, and created a baronet, which set him above tat ' 
profession of an author. The name of Naworth, the anagramsf 
Wharton, is sometimes prefixed to his almanacks. Ob. 13 Aug. 
1681. See the reign of Chablrs II. 

JOHANNES GADBURIUS, philomath, natut 
amUat.Oxan. An. 1627. JEt.%1. T. Cross sc. Over 
his head are the sun, moon, and stars; his left hand rests 
on a celestial globe, and the book of Heaven is open be- 
fore him.* — The print is before his "Doctrine of Na- 
tivities," 1658 ;fol. 

Johannes Gadburius. Crosssc. l2mo. 

John Gadbury, who served an apprenticeship with a tailor at 
Oxford, left that occupation, and pursued the vehement inclination 
he had to astrology. He learned much of his art from Lilly, tinder 
whom he profited to such a degree, that he was soon enabled " to 
set up the trade of almanack-making and fortune-telling for him- 
self ."t His pen was employed for many years on nativiiict, alma- 
*ackt, and pradigiet. Other astrologers were content to exercise 
their art for the benefit of their own country only, but Gadburj 
extended his to a remote part of the globe ; as, in 1674, Ee pub- 
lished his " West India, or Jamaica Almanack," for that year, fie 
Calculated the nativities of Charles I. the King of Sweden, and 
Sir Matthew Hale ; all which are in print. He styles Sir Matthew 
" the just and pious Scorpionist, as he was born under the celestial 
Scorpion." He was very careful to do justice to all the constel- 
lations, particularly to that just mentioned, as appears from his 
" Obsequium Ratiohabile ; or a reasonable Service performed fbr 
the celestial Sign Scorpio, in twenty remarkable Genitures of that 

Elorious, but stigmatized Horoscope, against the malicious and 
rise Attempts of that grand (but fortunate) Impostor Mr. William 
Lilly."t He was no less careful to do justice to the merit of his 
friend Mr. George Wharton, most of whose works he collected and 

"' Id the book h an astrological scheme, inscribed " lib. Ccett." 
t Wood, U. cot. 086. 

{ " Tibi bncbit contrahit ardeus 

Scoipiui, el cceli juita pln» pwle teliqiiU." — Vitto, 



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irtl.lished, in 1683, 8to. He was living in 1690,* and wu thought 
o be alive for many years alter his decease, as Ms name continue* 
o be affixed to an almanack similar to that which was published In 
■is lifetime. " The black life of John Gadbury" was written by 
Partridge. There are several heads of him, which belong to die 
reign of Charles II. 

GULIELMUS RAMESEY, generosus; nat. ci- 
pitat. Westmonast. 13 Mar. 1626-27. Cras* sc, h.sh. 

Gulielmus Ramesey, generosus ; M. 24; a 
bust, 

William Ramesey was author of a chimerical book in vindication 
of astrology. This man did not look upon darkness as a privation 
of light, but as a real substance. He asserted that it is an emana- 
tion from dark stars, as light is from the sun. He even thought 
this absurdity supported by Scripture, where he read of "darkness 
over the land of Egypt, which may be felt ;"f not distinguishing 
betwixt the stated laws of nature, and the extraordinary agency of 
divine Providence; or, in other words, betwist natural and super- 
natural darkness. The author of number 582 of the " Spectator,'' 
has made himself very merry with this profound writer, who thought, 
himself far more sagacious than the rest of his astrological brethren. 
He appears to me to be the same person with Dr. William Ramesey, 
who was, perhaps, the most credulous and confident of all astro* 
logers. He was mad by the rules of his art, and promised himself 
great affluence of fortune, and much conjugal felicity ; but died 
poor in a gaol, and had such a termagant for his wife as provoked 
him to write, " Conjugium Conjurgium," which appears to have 
been written from his feelings. J 

GULIELMUS WILLIAMS, alias Willjsuh, 
nat. comitat, Gloc. Janu. 27, 1626; pkilosophus; 
M. 32. 

1 am credibly informed that this print was copied from that of 
Christian Ravins, professor of Oriental languages at Amsterdam. 

* See " Alheu. Oioti." il. col. 1051. . . t Exod. >. 11. , 

See Dr. R±bisi£y'b irlicle in the leign of Chariei IL 



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OF ENGLAND. 61 

HENRY MASSINGBERD. Cross sc. h, sh. 
,'opicd by W. Richardson. 

This person was author of a folio, entitled, "Council add 
LdmoattioQ to his Children ;" Lond. 1656 ; to which his print is 

Several authors or music in the next Class. 

TUCHARLHJS ELTON, generosus Bristol, nee 
ion artis militaris magister, Ann. 1649, JEt, 39. J. 
Droeshout sc. h. sk. 

Under the print are eight verses, which I shall transcribe, as 
they may serve as a specimen of the encomiums which have been 
formerly lavished upon authors, whose works are now used for 
waste paper. | 

" If Rome unto her conqu'ring Caesars raise 
Rich obelisks, to crown their deathless praise; 
What monument to thee mast Albion rear. 
To ahciv thj motion in a brighter sphere ? 
This art's too dull to do't; 'Us only done 
Best by thyself : so lights the world the snn. 
We may admire thy face, the sculptor's art, • 
Bat we are extasy'd at th* inward part." 

Richard Elton was author of " A complete Body of the Art 
Military, being plain and perfect Directions for the ordering and 
framing' of an Army, both of Horse and Foot : together with the 
Manner of Fortifications, and the Art of Gunnery ;" fol. to which 
his head is prefixed. I find by Clavel's " Catalogue," that this 
hook was reprinted after the restoration. I need not inform the 
reader, that the art of war has been almost totally changed since 
the publication of this work. 

WILLIAM BARIFF, or Bariffe, Ml. 35 ; pre- 
fixed to " Military Discipline " 1643 ; 4to. Glover. 

William Bariffe, Mt, 42 ; prefixed to the same. ' 

William Barif'f; in armour; sash, 8gc. In 
Ricrafi. 



id ^ Google 



,62 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

WILLIAM BAREFFE, who, in the year 1642, was a major io 
Col. Homdftn's regiment,* flourished during the Interregnum. He 
was author of a book of " Military Discipline," of which there have 
been several edition!. The last edition was, I think, printed in 
folio, 1661. 

RIC. RAWLYNS. R. Gaywoodf. 1656 ; copied. 

This person, who styles himself " Professor of Arithmetic in 
Great Yarmouth," was author of a practical treatise on that art, 
published in 1656, 8 vo. before which is the head above described, 
engraved much in the manner of Hollar, of whom Gaywood was a 
disciple and imitator. 

THOMAS WILLSFORD, 2Et. 46. R. Vaughan «. 
Under the print are four verses, signed M. Battler. 

Thomas Willsford was author of a book in 8vo. called " Nature's 
Secrets, or the History of the Generation of Meteors," 1658; which 
he dedicates to the Lady Stafford, sister to Lord Henry Stafford. 
At the conclusion he signs himself " her affectionate kinsman." 
M. Boteler, whose name is affixed to the lines at the bottom of the 
print, addresses a long copy of verses to his honoured uncle, upon 
his book of meteors. Thomas Willsford was also author, of s 
" Treatise of Arithmetic," in 8vo. His head, by Vaughan, is pre- 
fixed to both his books. Cocker, Leybourn, Hilt, and others, hare 
much improved the art of arithmetic, since the two last-mentioned 
authors wrote on that subject. 

.■ WILLIAM LILLY, student in astrology. Hollar f. 
\2mo. 

William Lilly, Mi- 57. Hollar /. 

William Lilly, student in astrology ; copied 
from Hollar. 

William Lilly ; prefixed to his " Ephemeris," 
1650. 

* Sec !hs"Lii[ of the Anniei," published in 16i3. 



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* OF ENGLAND. ■ 63 

"William Lilly; do. R.Gayioood. 

"William Lilly; oval; do. Marshall. 

"William Lilly; half length; sitting at a table; 
to his " Christian Astrology." Marshall. 

"William Lilly ; to his " Ephemeris." R. Vaughan. 

"William Lilly; in an oval; between Cardan and 
Guido ; four verses. 

In the Asbmolean Museum is his portrait, which was the pro- 
perty of the founder. It may be depended upon for the likeness. 

William Lilly was a native of Diae worth, in Leicestershire. He 
was, for several years, in the condition of a servant ; but having 
the good luck to marry his master's widow, with a fortune of 1000/. 
he applied himself to the study of astrology. He made so great a 
proficiency, that in seven or eight weeks he perfectly understood 
how to set a figure. He ultimata, that there was something su- 
pernatural in the progress he made in this art; as he tells us, that 
" he prayed for several weeks to those angels who were thought 
and believed by wise men to teach and instruct in all the several 
liberal sciences." * In 1647, he finished his book called "Christian 
Astrology;" but has not any where signified that the angels lent 
him their assistance in that work ; nor does it appear that there is 
any thing in it more than the author himself was well able to per- 
form, r It is very certain that he regarded judicial astrology as a 
science ; and it is no less certain that he prostituted his pen to the 
political purposes of the parliament and of Cromwell. J Astrolo- 
gical predictions and prophecies were perfectly suited to the enthu- 
siasm of these times; and Lilly well knew how to apply them to 

* He says, that " the angels very rarely speak to any operator or muter; and 
"lien they do apeak, it it liks the Irish, much in the throat." — Lilly's " Life," by 
himself, p. 88, La. t edit. . 

I There it before this book a good head of the author, t>y Marshall 
% " When Cromwell was in Scotland, a soldier Blood with Lilly'! (Merlinns) 
Anglicui in his hud, and said, as the several troops passed by him, ' Lo hear what 
Lilly sailb, yon are promised victory, fight It out, brave boys;' and then read that 
ninth's prediction." — " Life," p. 83. 



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64 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

the hopes and fears of the populace. He was frequently a 
and oracular, and sometime! amused the people with hieroglyphics; 
many of which, as we are told by Mr. Aubrey, he stole from an old 
monkish manuscript. Moore, the almanack-maker, has stolen se- 
veral front him ; and there is no doubt but some future almanack - 
maker will steal them from Moore. Ob. June 9, 1681.* 

JOHN BOOKER ; oval ; in a cloak ; a book in his 
hand; anonymous; scarce, 

John Booker, JEt. 46; small. 

John Booker. Hollar f. 12mo. 

John Booker was bred a haberdasher ; f but quitted this em- 
ployment, and followed that of a writing-master, at Hadley, in 
Middlesex. He in a few years rendered himself so eminent, that 
he was appointed licenser of mathematical books ; under which 
were included all those that related to the celestial sciences. Lilly 
tells us, that he once thought him the greatest astronomer in the ' 

- * Lilly, tbongh known to be IB impostor,! bad, however, a pension of 10M- I 
• year conferred on htm by the council of state. Tlie royalists treated him 
with ridicule and contempt. He ii the Sidrophel of Bullet : and Sir John Birken- 
head, in his "Paul's Church -Yard,"} satirizes his almanack, where be mention! 
" Merlinus Anglicus, the Art of discovering all that never was, and all that never 
shall be." (Jataker, who well knew the futility of bis art, calls him " blind bus- 
i*rd."tj He seems to have been checked by no scruples in promoting the rebellion ; 
and indeed tells us himself, that be " engaged body and soul in the cause of tbe , 
parliament."* 

The Life of Lilly, by himself, together with his Life of Charles I. and that of bis 
friend Ashmole, written by that author by way of diary, have, as tbey were become 
very scarce, been lately republished by Thomas- Davie*. "A full Answer to a 
confused mixture of false, Iraiteraus, and contradictory Observations on the Life 
and Actions of the late King Charles, published by William Lilly, in July, 1651," 
it one of the '• Historical Discourses" of Sit Edward Walker, 1703, fol. 

1 So Lilly informs us ; hot Mr. Wood says, that he was bred a clerk under aa 
alderman of London : this alderman was probably a haberdasher. 

J 8eeThurloe's"StaIePapers,"v.431. 

$ Tbis pamphlet is a facetious satire upon various books well known at this time, 
and supposed lo be sold in St. Paul's Church- yard. 

| Gatafcer'a Notes on the Id Verse of the X. Chapter of Jeremiah, in tbe " As- 
sembly's Annotations.'' 

■ Lilly's "Life," p. 45. 



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OF ENGLAND- 65 

world ; but it appears that he afterward sunk in his esteem, and 
that he thought himself a much greater man. We are told by the 
same author, that " he bad a curious fancy in judging of thefts, 
and as successful in resolving love questions," which was a capital 
branch of his trade. George Wharton, who was formerly one of 
his astrological friends, had a great quarrel with him, which occa- 
sioned his publishing, " Mercurio-crelico Mastix; or an Anti-caveat 
to all such as hare heretofore had the misfortune to be cheated and 
deluded by that great and traiterous impostor, John Booker; in an 
Answer to his frivolous Pamphlet, entitled, MercuriuB Ccelicus, or 
a Caveat to all the People of England;" Oxon. 1644; 4to. The 
only work of Booker, worth the reader's notice, is his " Bloody 
Irish Almanack," which contains some memorable particulars rela- 
tive to the war in Ireland. Ob, April, 1667. 

CAPTAIN GEORGE WHARTON ; six verses, 
" Here the true Counterfeit" fyc. This print may be 
placed in the preceding reign. 

George "Wharton; six verses, "Wise Nature," S$c. 

GeorgeWh arton, by Faithorne; sixverses, "Who 
views," 8$c. 

George Wharton was descended from a genteel family in West- 
moreland. He spent the greatest part of his patrimony in the service 
of Charles I.- for whom he raised a fine troop of horse, which be 
commanded in person. When he could no longer keep the Geld, 
he retired to his studies, which he pursued with uncommon appli- 
cation ; particularly that of astrology, to which he had a strong and 
early propensity. His progress in this art was suitable to his pas- 
sion for it ; and he was looked upon by the royalists as equal, at 
least, to Lilly and Booker, of whom be was the rival and antagonist. 
He was author of Almanacks, Mercuries, and several astronomical 
pieces. We are indebted to him for a chronology of the battles, 
sieges, and other remarkable occurrences of the civil war, since 
printed, with many additions, in the " Historians Guide," and of 
late years in Salmon's " Chronological Historian." He had a 
knack of versifying, which he exercised in little sallies of drollery 
and satire, which are interspersed with his astrological works. 

VOL. IV. K 



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06 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

Upon the restoration he was appointed treasurer and paymaster 
of the ordnance, and created a baronet, which set him above tie 
profession of an author. The name of Naaorth, the anagram of 
Wharton, is sometimes prefixed to his almanacks. Ob. 12 Aug. 
1681. See the reign of Charles II. 

JOHANNES GADBURIUS, philomath, natrn 
comitat. Oxon. An. 1627. JEt. 31. T. Cross sc. Over 
his head art the sun, moon, and stars; his left hand rests 
on a celestial globe, and the book of Heaven is open be- 
fore him.* — The print is before his " Doctrine of Na- 
tivities" 1658 ;/W. 

Johannes Gadburius. Crosssc. l2mo. 

John Gadbury, who served an apprenticeship with a tailor at 
Oxford, left that occupation, and pursued the vehement inclination 
he had to astrology. He learned much of his art from Lilly, under 
whom he profited to such a degree, that he was soon enabled " to 
■et up the trade of almanack- making and fortune-telling for him- 
self."t His pen was employed for many years on nativities, alma- 
Kackt, and prodigia. Other astrologers were content to exercise 
their art for the benefit of their own country only, but Gadbury 
extended his to a remote-part of the globe; as, in 1674, he pub- 
lished his " West India, or Jamaica Almanack," for that year. He 
Calculated the nativities of Charles I. the King of Sweden, and 
Sir Matthew Hale ; all which are in print. He styles Sir Matthew 
" the just and pious Scorpioniat, as he was born under the celestial 
Scorpion." He Was very careful to do justice to all the constel- 
lations, particularly to that just mentioned, as appears from his 
** Obsequium Rationabile; or a reasonable Service performed fcr 
the celestial Sign Scorpio, in twenty remarkable Genitures of that 
glorious, but stigmatized Horoscope, against the malicious and 
false Attempts of that grand {but fortunate) Impostor Mr. William 
Lilly."! He was no less careful to do justice to the merit of his 
friend -Mr. George Wharton, most of whose works he collected and 

•In die book Si on serological scheme, inscribed " Lib. Cocli." 
t Wood, ii. cut. 6(1(3. 

t " Tibi bracbia cootrahit ardent 

Scorpius, et tili j=«* ph» parte reliqiiii." — Vina. 



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OF ENGLAND. «? 

published, in 1683, 8vo, He was living in 1690 * and was thought 
to be alive for many yean after bis decease, as Iris name continued 
to be affixed to an almanack similar to that which was published in 
his lifetime. " The Mack Life of John Gadbury" was written by 
Partridge. There are several heads of him, which belong to the 
reign of Charles II. 

GULIELMUS RAMESEY, gerierosus; nat. ci- 
Vitat. Westmonast. 13 Mar. 1626-27. Cross sc, h.sk. 

Gulielmus Ramesey, generosus ; ffl. 24; a 
bust. 

William Ramesey was author of a chimerical book in vindication 
of astrology. This man did not look upon darkness as a privation 
of light, but as a real substance. He asserted that it is an emana- 
tion from dark stars, as light is from the sun. He even thought 
this absurdity supported by Scripture, where he read of " darkness 
over the land of Egypt, which may be felt ;"f not distinguishing 
betwixt the stated laws of nature, and the extraordinary agency of 
divine Providence ; or, in other words, betwixt natural and super- 
natural darkness. The author of number 582 of the " Spectator,*' 
has made himself very merry with this profound writer, who thought 
himself far more sagacious than the rest of his astrological brethren. 
He appears to me to be the same person with Dr. William Ramesey, 
who was, perhaps, the most credulous and confident of all astro- 
logers. He was mad by the rules of his art, and promised himself 
great affluence of fortune, and much conjugal felicity; but died 
poor in a gaol, and had such a termagant for his wife as provoked 
him to write, " Conjugium Conjurgium,'* which appears to have 
been written from his feelings 4 

GULIELMUS WILLIAMS, alias Willjsum, 
not. comitat. Gioc. Janu. 27, 1626; philosophus ; 
M. 32. ; 

I am credibly informed that this print was copied from that of 
Christian Ravius, professor of Oriental languages at Amsterdam. 



J.gil zed by GOOgle 



3d by Google 



J,gil zed by GOOgle 



Put tyVR>cJiarJ/in May Mice tTJ/JiramJ. 



OF ENGLAND. 61 

HENRY MASSINGBERD. Cross sc. k. sh. 
Vopied by W. Rickardson. 

This person was author of a folio, entitled, "Council arid 
Admonition to his Children;" Loud. 1656 ; to which his print is 
prefixed. 

Several authors on music in the next Class. 

RICHARDUS ELTON, generosus Bristol, nee 
nbn artis militaris magister, Ann. 1649, Ml. 39. J. 
Droeshout sc. h.sk. 

Under the print are eight verses, which I shall transcribe, as 
they may serve as a specimen of the encomiums which hare been 
formerly lavished upon authors, whose works are now used for 
waste paper. 

" If Rome unto her cooqu'ring Cmiara raise 
Rich obelisks, to crown their death les) praise; 
What monument to thee riiust Albion real. 
To shew thy motion in a brighter sphere ? 
This art') too dull to do'I; 'tis only done 
But by thyself : *o lights the world the son. 
We may admire thy face, the sculptor's art, ■ 
But we are citasy'd at th' inward paH." 

Richard Elton was author of " A complete Body of the Art 
Military, being plain and perfect Directions for the ordering and 
framing of an Army, both of Horse and Foot : together with the 
Manner of Fortifications, and the Art of Gunnery j" fol. to which 
his head is prefixed. I find by Clavel's " Catalogue," that this 
hook was reprinted after the restoration. I need not inform the 
reader, that die art of war has been almost totally changed since 
the publication of this work. 

WILLIAM BAR1FF, or Bariffe, M. 35; pre- 
jijeed to " Military Discipline" 1643; Ato. Glover. 

William Bariffe, JEt. 42 ; prefixed to the same. ' 

William Bariff; in armour; sash, fyc. Ip 
Ricrafl. 



id ^ Google 



,62 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

. WILLIAM BAUII' TE, who, in the year 1642, was a major in 
Col. Hamden's regiment * flourished during the Interregnum. He 
was author of a book of " Military Discipline ," of which there have 
been several editions. Tbe lust edition was, I think, printed in 
folio, 1661. 

RIC. RAWLYNS. R. Gat/wood/. 1656 ; copied. 

This person, who styles himself " Professor of Arithmetic in 
Great Yarmouth," was author of a practical treatise on that art, 
'published in 1656, 8vo. before which is the head above described, 
engraved much in the manner of Hollar, of whom Gaywood was a 
disciple and imitator. 

THOMAS WILLSFORD, JEt. 46. R. Vaugkan sc. 
Under the print are four verses, signed M. Boteler. 

Thomas Willaford was author of a book in 8vo. called " Nature') 
Secrets, or the History of the Generation of Meteors," 1658; which 
he dedicates to die Lady Stafford, sister to Lord Henry Stafford. 
At the conclusion he signs himself " her affectionate kinsman." ; 
M. Boteler, whose name is affixed to the lines at the bottom of the 
print, addresses a long copy of verses to his honoured uncle, upon 
his book of meteors. Thomas Willsford was also author, of a 
" Treatise of Arithmetic," in 8vo. His head, by Vaughan, is pre- 
fixed to both his books. Cocker, Leybourn, Hill, and others, hare 
much improved the art of arithmetic, since the two last-mentioned 
authors wrote on that subject. 

WILLIAM LILLY, student in astrology. Hollar f. , 
\2mo. . ! 

William Lilly, Mt. 57. Hollar f. 

William Lilly, student in astrology; copied 
from Hollar. 

William Lilly ; prefixed to his " Ephemeris," 
1650. 

* See (be " Liit of the Aimiet," published in 1612. 

D,gil zed by GOOgle 



> OF ENGLAND. 63 

William Lilly; do. R.Gaywood, 

"William Lilly ; oval; do. Marshall. 

William Lilly; half length; sitting at a table; 
lo his " Christian Astrology." Marshall. 

William Lilly; to his " Ephemeris" R.Vaughati. 

William Lilly; in an oval ; between Cardan and 
Guido; four verses. 

In the Ashmolean Museum is his portrait, which was the pro- 
perty of the founder. It may be depended upon for the likeness. 

William Lilly was a native of Diseworth, in Leicestershire. He 
was, for several years, in the condition of a servant ; but having 
the good luck to marry his master's widow, with a fortune of 1000/. 
he applied himself to the study of astrology. He made so great a 
proficiency, that in seven or eight weeks he perfectly understood 
how to set a figure. He intimates, that there was something su- 
pernatural in the progress he made in this art; as he tells us, that 
" he prayed for several weeks to those angels who were thought 
and believed by wise men to teach and instruct in all the several 
liberal sciences." * In 1647, he finished his book called " Christian 
Astrology;" but has not any where signified that the angels lent 
him their assistance in that work ; nor does it appear that there is 
any thing in it more than the author himself was well able to per- 
form, f It is very certain that he regarded judicial astrology as a 
trimce ; and it is .no less certain that he prostituted bis pen to the 
political purposes of the parliament and of Cromwell, f Astrolo- 
gical predictions and prophecies were perfectly suited to the enthu- 
siasm of these times; and Lilly well knew how to apply them to 

• He says, lhal " the angek very rarely speak to any operator or master; Mid 
■hen they do speak, it Is tike the Irish, much id the throat." — Lilly'* "Life," by 
himself, p. 88, last edit. 

t There is before this book a good head of the author, hy Marshall... 

I " Wlien Cromwell «a> in Scotland, a soldier stood with Lilly'! (Merlinus) 
Anglicul in his hand, arid said, ai the several troop passed by him, ' Lo hear what 
Lilly lailb, yon are promised victory, fight it out, brave boyij' and then read that 
■unlh'i prediction." — " Life," p. 83. 



3d by Google 



64 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

the hopes and fears of the populace. He was frequently ambigirom 
and oracular, and sometimes aroused the people with hieroglyphics; 
many of which, :u we are told by Mr. Aubrey, he stole from an old 
monkish manuscript. Moore, the almanack-maker, has stolen se- 
veral from him ; and there is no doubt but some future almanack - 
maker will steal them from Moore. Ob. June 9, 1681.* 

JOHN BOOKER; oval^ in a cloak ; a book in hit 
hand; anonymous; scarce. 

John Booker, JEt. 46; small. 

John Booker. Hollar f. \2mo. 

John Booker was bred a haberdasher ; f but quitted this em- 
ployment, and followed that of a writing-master, at Hadley, in 
Middlesex. He in a few years rendered himself so eminent, tbH 
he was appointed licenser of mathematical books ; under which 
were included all those that related to the celestial science). LiHj 
tells us, that he once thought him the greatest astronomer in the 

- * Lilly, tltoonh known to be in impostcr.t bid, however, a pension of 1001 
a year conferred on htm by the council of stale. The royalists treated wn 
with ridicule and contempt. He it the Sidrophel of Butler : aud Sir John Biitas- 
head, in Ms "Paul's Church -Yard," J satirizes his almanack,' -where he nww* 
"' Merlinus Anglicus, the Art of discovering all that never was, and all that nt'O 
•hall be." Gataker, who well knew the futility of his art, calls him " blind bat 
mnt."H He seems to have been checked by no scrapie) in promoting the reWw I 
and indeed tells us himself, that be " engaged body and soul in the cause of "* 
parliament."T 

The Life of Lilly, bj himself, together with hia Life of Charles L and Uutol »» 
friend Ashmole, written by that author by way of diary, have, as they were beojM 
very scarce, been lately republished by Thomas -Danes. "A full Answer lo ' 
confused mixture of false, traiterous, aud contradictory Observations on tlw W 
and Actions of the late King Charles, published by William Lilly, in July, if*'." 
is one of the " Historical Discourses" of Sir Edward Walker, 1705. fol. 

< So Lilly inform) us; bnt Mr. Wood says, that he 'was bred a clerk under » 
alderman of London : this alderman was probably a haberdasher. 

t See Tburloe's " State Papers," v. 431. 

$ This pamphlet is a facetious satire upon various books well known at this uof- 
and supposed lo be sold in St. Paul's Church-yard. 

K Gatakers Notes on the id Verse of the X. Chapter of Jeremiah, in Us"**' 
letubly's Annotations." 

•J Lilly's "Life," p. 45. 



^Google 



OF ENGLAND. 65 

world ; but it appears that he afterward sunk in his esteem, and 
that he thought himself a much greater man. We are told by the 
same author, that " be had a curious fancy in judging of thefts, 
and as successful in resolving love questions," which was a capital 
branch of his trade. George Wharton, who was formerly one of 
his astrological friends, had a great quarrel with him, which occa- 
sioned hia publishing, " Mercurio-ccelico Mastix; or an Anti-caveat 
to all such as have heretofore bad the misfortune to be cheated and 
deluded by that great and traiterous impostor, John Booker; in an 
Answer to bis frivolous Pamphlet, entitled, Mercurius Calicut, or 
a Caveat to all the People of England ;" Oxon. 1644 ; 4to. The 
only work of Booker, worth the reader's notice, is his " Bloody 
Irish Almanack," which contains some memorable particulars rela- 
tive to the war in Ireland. Ob. April, 1667. 

CAPTAIN GEORGE WHARTON; six verses, 
"Here the true Counterfeit," 8$c. This print may be 
placed in the preceding reign. 

George Wharton; six verses, "Wise Nature," fyc. 

George Wharton, by Faithorne; six verses, " Who 
views, 1 ' «§■£. 

George Wharton was descended from a genteel family in West- 
moreland. He spent the greatest part of his patrimony in the service 
of Charles I. for whom be raised a fine troop of horse, which he 
commanded in person. When he could no longer keep the field, 
he retired to his studies, which he pursued with uncommon appli- 
cation ; particularly that of astrology, to which he had a strong and 
early propensity. His progress in this art was suitable to his pas- 
sion'for it; and he was looked upon by the royalists as equal, at 
least, to Lilly and Booker, of whom be was the rival and antagonist. 
He was author of Almanacks, Mercuries, and several astronomical 
pieces. We are indebted to him for a chronology of the battles, 
'ieges, and other remarkable occurrences of the civil war, since 
printed, with many additions, in the " Historian's Guide," and of 
late years in Salmon's " Chronological Historian." He had a 
knack of versifying, which he exercised in little sallies of drollery 
and satire, which are interspersed with his astrological works. 



id ^ Google 



06 BIOGrtAP«ICAL HTSTORY 

Upon the restoration he was appointed treasurer and paymaster 
of the ordnance, and created a baronet, which set him above the 
profession of an author. The name of Nanorti, the anagram of 
Wharton, is sometimes prefixed to bis almanacks. Ob, 12 Aug. 
1681. See the reign of OhahlEs II. 

JOHANNES GADBURIUS, philomath, natm 
comitat. Oxon, An. 1627. JEt. 31. T. Cross sc. Over 
his head are the sun, moon, and stars; his left hand rests 
on a celestial globe, and the book of Heaven is open be- 
fore him.* — The -print is before his " Doctrine of Na- 
tivities," 1658 ;fol. 

Johannes Gadburius. Cross sc. Vlmo. 

John Gadbury, who served an apprenticeship with a tailor at 
Oxford, left that occupation, and pursued the vehement inclination 
he had to astrology. He learned much of bis art from Lilly, under 
whom he profited to such a degree, that he was soon enabled " to 
set up the trade of almanack -making and fortune- telling for him- 
self, "f His pen was employed for many years on nativities, afow- 
■nacki, and prodigies. Other astrologers were content to exercise 
their art for the benefit of their own country only, but Gadbury 
extended his to a remote part of the globe; as, in 1674, he pub- 
lished his " West India, or Jamaica Almanack," for that year. He 
Calculated die nativities of Charles I. the King of Sweden, and 
Sir Matthew Hale ; all which are in print. He Styles Sir Matthew 
" the just and pious Scorpionist, as he was born under the celestial 
Scorpion." He was very careful to do justice to all the constel- 
lations, particularly to that just mentioned, as appears from bis 
" Obsequium Ratiohabile ; or a reasonable Service performed for 
tee celestial Sign Scorpio, in twenty remarkable Genitures of that 
glorious, but stigmatized Horoscope, against the malicious and 
raise Attempts of that grand (but fortunate) Impostor Mr. William 
Lilly "t He was no less careful to do justice to the merit of his 
friend Mr. George Wharton, most Of whose works he collected and 

*' In the book is an astrological scheme, inscribed " lib. Coeli." 
t Wood, ii, col. 666. 

t — " Tibi bracbia eontiahit ardens 

Scoipiui, et cceJi juilB phu parte reliqnii.'' — Vino. 



3d by Google 



OF ENGLAND. 67 

ntbiished, In 1663, 8ro. He was living in 1690,* and was thought 
o be alive for many years after bis decease, as bis name continued 
to be affixed to an almanack similar to that which was published in 
lis lifetime. " The Mack life of John Gadbury" was written by 
Partridge. There are several beads of him, which belong to the 
reign of Charles II. 

GULIELMUS RAMESEY, gerierosus; nat. ci- 
Pftat. Westmonast. 13 Mar. 1626-27. Cross sc. h.sk. 

Gulielmus Rameset, generosus ; JEt.2>%; a 
bust, 

William Ramesey was author of a chimerical book in vindication 
of astrology. This man did not look upon darkness as a privation 
of light, but as a real substance. He asserted that it is an emana- 
tion from dark stars, as light is from the sun. He even thought 
tbis absurdity supported by Scripture, where he read of " darkness 
over the laud of Egypt, which may be felt ; H f not distinguishing 
betwixt the stated laws of nature, and the extraordinary agency of 
divine Providence ; or, in other words, betwixt natural and super- 
natural darkness. The author of number 582 of the " Spectator,' - 
has made himself very merry with this profound writer, who thuught 
himself far more sagacious than the rest of his astrological brethren. 
He appears to me to be the same person with Dr. William Ramesey, 
who was, perhaps, the most credulous aud confident of all astro- 
logers. He was mad by the rules of his art, and promised himself 
great affluence of fortune, and much conjugal felicity ; but died 
poor in a gaol, and had such a termagant for his wife as provoked 
him to write, " Conjugium Conjurgium," which appears to have 
been written from his feelings.! 

GULIELMUS WILLIAMS, alias Willjsuh, 
not. comitat. Gloc. Janu. 2,1, 1626; pkilosophus; 
M. 32. 

I am credibly informed that this print was copied from that of 
Christum Ravius, professor of Oriental languages at Amsterdam. 



id ^ Google 



3d by Google 



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J*uh lyWacharJfonMay f.fSoo IFSfJtrand. 



OF ENGLAND. 61 

HENRY MASSINGBERD. Cross sc. h, sh. 
Vopied by W. Richardson. 

This person was author of a folio, entitled, "Council and 
Admonition to his Children;" Load. 1656; to which his print is 
prefixed. 

Several authors on music in the next Class. 

HICHARDUS ELTON, generosus Bristol, nee 
non artis militaris magister, Ann. 1649, JR. 39. ./, 
Droeshout sc. h.sh. 

Under the print are eight verses, which I shall transcribe, as 

they may serve as a specimen of the encomiums which have been 

formerly lavished upon authors, whose works are now used' for 

waste paper. , 

" If Borne onto her conqn'ring Caaara raise 

Rich obelisks, to crown their deathless praise ; 

What monnment to thee most Albitm rear. 

To shew thy motion in ■ brighter iphere ? ■ 

This art's too dull to do't; 'tis only done 

Best by tli j self : ao lights the world the ran. 

We may admire thy face, the sculptor's art, ■ 

Bat we are extaayM at th> inward part.'' 

Richard Elton was author of " A complete Body of the Art 
Military, being plain and perfect Directions for the ordering and 
framing of an Army, both of Horse and Foot : together with the 
Manner of Fortifications, and the Art of Gunnery ;" fol. to which 
his head is prefixed. 1 find by CIavel*s " Catalogue," that this 
book was reprinted after the restoration. I need not inform the 
reader, that the art of war has been almost totally changed since 
the publication of this work. 

WILLIAM BAR1FF, or Bariffe, M. 35; pre- 
jbed to " Military Discipline," 1643; 4to. Glover. 

William Bariffe, JEf. 42 ; prefixed to the same. ' 

William Bariff ; in armour; sash, Ǥ-c. In 
Ricrajl. 



id ^ Google 



v62 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

. WILLIAM BARIFFE, who, in the year 1642, was a major in 
Col. Hamden's regiment* flourished during the Interregnum. He 
was author of a book of" Military Discipline," of which there ha=e 
been several editions. The last edition was, I think, printed in 
folio, 1661. 

RIC.RAWLYNS. R.Gayivoodf 1656; copied. 

. . This person, who styles himself " Professor of Arithmetic in 
Great Yarmouth," wag author of a practical treatise on that art, 
published in 1656, Bvo. before which is the head above described, 
engraved much in the manner of Hollar, of whom Gaywood was a 
disciple and imitator. 

THOMAS WILLSFORD, M. 46. R. Vaughan sc. 
Under the print are four verses, signed M. Bolder. 

Thomas Willsford was author of a book in 8vo. called " Nature'* 
Secrets, or the History of the Generation of Meteors," 1658; which 
he dedicates to the Lady Stafford, sister to Lord Henry Stafford. 
At the conclusion he signs himself "her affectionate kinsman." 
M. Boteler, whose name is affixed to the lines at the bottom of the 
print, addresses a long copy of verses to his honoured uncle, upon 
his book of meteors. Thomas Willsford was also author- of a 
" Treatise of Arithmetic," in 8vo. His head, by Vaughan, is pre- 
fixed to both his books. Cocker, Leybourn, Hill, and others, hare 
much improved the art of arithmetic, since the two last-mentioned 
authors wrote on that subject. 

: - WILLIAM LILLY, student in astrology. Hollar/. 
\2mo. 

William Lilly, M. 57. Hollar f. 

William Lilly, student in astrology; copied 
from Hollar. 

William Lilly ; prefixed to his " Ephemcris" 
1650. 

• See the "Ijit of the Armies," published in (64*. 



id by Google 



' ' OF ENGLAND. ' 63 

William Lilly; do. R.Gaywood. 
"William Lilly; oval; do. Marshall. 

William Lilly; half length; sitting at a table; 
to his " Christian Astrology." Marshall. 

William Lilly; to his " Ephemeris" R.Vaugkan. 

William Lilly; in an oval ; between Cardan and 
Guido ; four verses. 

In the Asbmolean Museum is his portrait, which was the pro- 
perty of the founder. It may be depended upon for the likeness. 

William Lilly was a native of Dise worth, in Leicestershire. He 
was, for several years, in the condition of a servant ; bat having 
the good luck to marry his master's widow, with a fortune of 1000/. 
he applied himself to the study of astrology. He made so great a 
proficiency, that in seven or eight weeks he perfectly understood 
how to set a figure. He intimates, that there was something su- 
pernatural in the progress he made in this art ; as he tells us, that 
" he prayed for several weeks to those angels who were thought 
and believed by wise men to teach and instruct in all the several 
liberal sciences." * In 1647, he finished his book called " Christian 
Astrology ;" but has not anywhere signified that the angels lent 
him their assistance in that work ; nor does it appear that there is 
any thing in it more than the author himself was well able to per- 
form, t It is very certain that he regarded judicial astrology as a 
icience ; and it is.no less certain that he prostituted his pen to the 
political purposes of the parliament and of Cromwell. J Astrolo- 
gical predictions and prophecies were perfectly suited to the enthu- 
siasm of these times ; and Lilly well knew how to apply them to 

* He rays, thai " the angels very rarely speak to any operator or master; and 
when they do apeak, il is like (he Irish, much in the throat. " — Lilly's " Life," by 
himself, p. 88, hut edit. . 

t There il before this book a good head of the author, hy Marshall. 

J." When Cromwell was in Scotland, a soldier stood with Lilly's (Mertinus) 
Aiigiieus in his hand, and said, as (he several troops passed by him, * Lo hear what 
Lilly saith, yon are promised victory, fight it out, brave boys ;' and then read thai 
laumh'i prediction." — " Life," p. 83. 



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64 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

the hopes and fears of the populace. He was frequently ambiguous 
and oracular, and sometimes amused the people with hieroglyphics; 
many of which, as we are told by Mr. Aubrey, he stole from an old 
monkish manuscript. Moore, the almanack- maker, has stolen se- 
veral from him ; and there is no doubt but some future almansck- 
maker will steal them from Moore. Ob. June 9, 1681 * 

JOHN BOOKER; oval; in a cloak; a book in hit 
hand; anonymous; scarce. 

John Booker, JEt. 46; small. 

John Booker. Hollar f. \2rno. 

John Booker was bred a haberdasher ; f but quitted this em- 
ployment, and followed that of a writing-master, at Hadley, in 
Middlesex. He in a few years rendered himself so eminent, thai 
he was appointed licenser of mathematical books ; under which 
were included alt those that related to the celestial tciatca. Lilly 
tells us, that he once thought him the greatest astronomer in the 

* lilly, though known to be in impostor,! had, however, a pension of lW- 
a year conferred on him by the council of state. The royalbts treated ha 
with ridicule and contempt. He is the Sidrophcl of Butler : and Sir John Birtea- 
head, in hii "Paul's Church-Yard,"} satirizes his almanack, where be menlioro 
** Me rlinus Anglicus, the Art of discovering all that never wai, and all that never 
shall be." Galaker, who well knew the futility of lib art, calls him " blind hm- 
iard-"(j He seemi to have been checked by no scruples in promoting the rebellion , 
and indeed tells us himself, that ho " engaged body and soul in the came of the 
parliament,"* 

The Life of Lilly, by. himself, together with his Life of Charles I. and that of ho 
friend Ailimnle, written by that author by way of diary, have, as they were beam* 
very scarce, been lately republished by Thomas Davics. "A full Answer to ■ 
confused mixture of false, traiterous, and contradictory Observations on the Life 
and Actions of the late King Charles, published by William Lilly, in July, 1651," 
is one of the " Historical Discourses" of Sir Edward Walker, 1705, foi. 

t So Lilly informs us; but Mr. Wood says, that he was bred a clerk under is 
alderman of London : this alderman was probably a haberdasher. 

J See Thurfoe's " State Papers," v. 451. 

$ This pamphlet is a facetious satire upon various books well known at this tiM, 
and supposed to be sold in St, Paul's Church-yard. 

B Gatnber 's Notes on the Sd Verse of the X. Chapter of Jeremiah, in Use "Ac 
lenibly's Annotations."' 

f Lilly's "Life," p. 45. 



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OF ENGLAND. 65 

World; but it appears that be afterward sunk in his esteem, and 
■hat he thought himself a much greater man. We are told by the 
■arac author, that " be bad a curious fancy in judging of thefts, 
fcnil as successful in resolving love questions," which was a capita) 
Branch of his trade. George Wharton, who was formerly one of 
lis astrological friends, had a great quarrel with him, which occa- 
lioned ilia publishing, " Mercurio-ccatico Mastix; or an Anti-caveat 
to all such as have heretofore had the misfortune to be cheated and 
''deluded by that great and traiterous impostor, John Booker ; in an 
'Answer to his frivolous Pamphlet, entitled, Mercurius Ccalicus, or 
a Caveat to all the People of England;" Oxon. 1644; 4to. The 
only work of Booker, worth the reader's notice, is his " Bloody 
Irish Almanack," which contains some memorable particulars rela- 
tive to the war in Ireland. Ob. April, 1667. 

CAPTAIN GEORGE WHARTON ; six verses, 
" Here the true Counterfeit" t§r. This print may be 
placed in the preceding reign. 

George Wharton; six verses, "Wise Nature," &;c. 

George Wharton, by Faithorne; siv verses, " Who 
views," 8$c. 

George Wharton was descended from a genteel family in West- 
moreland. He spent the greatest part of his patrimony in the service 
of Charles I. for whom he raised a fine troop of horse, which be 
commanded in person. When he could no longer keep the field, 
he retired to his studies, which he pursued with uncommon appli- 
cation ; particularly that of astrology, to which be had a strong and 
early propensity. His progress in this art was suitable to bis pas- 
sion for it; and he was looked upon by the royalists as equal, at 
least, to Lilly and Booker, of whom he was the rival and antagonist. 
He was author of Almanacks, Mercuries, and several astronomical 
pieces. We are indebted to him for a chronology of the battles, 
sieges, and other remarkable occurrences of the civil war, since 
printed, with many additions, in the " Historian's Guide," and of 
late years in Salmon's " Chronological Historian." He had a 
knack of versifying, which he exercised in little sallies of drollery 
and satire, which are interspersed with his astrological works, 



3d ^ Google 



06 BIOGrtAPfllCAL HISTORY 

Upon the restoration he was appointed treasurer and paymaster 
of the ordnance, and created a baronet, which set him above the ■ 
profession of an author. The name of Natnorth, the anagram of 
. Wharton, is sometimes prefixed to his almanack*. Ob. 12 Aug. 
1681. See the reign of CiuiLta II. 

JOHANNES GADBURIUS, philomath, nalus 
comiiat. Oxon. An. 1627. M.ZX. T. Cross sc. Over 
his head are the sun, moon, and stars; his left hand rests 
on a celestial globe, arid the book of Heaven is open be- 
fore him.* — The print is before kis " Doctrine of Na- 
tivities," 1658 ifol. 

Johannes Gadburivs. Cross sc. \1mo. 

John Gadbury, who served an apprenticeship with a tailor at 
Oxford, left that occupation, and pursued the vehement inclination 
he had to astrology. He learned much of his art from Lilly, under 
whom he profited to auch a degree, that he was soon enabled " to 
set up the trade of aim aaack- making and for tune -telling for him- 
self, "f His pen Was employed for many years on nativities, alma- 
Hackt, and prodigies. Other astrologers were content to exercise 
their art for the benefit of their own country only, but Gadbury 
extended his to a remote-part of the globe ; as, in 1674, lie pub- 
lished his " West India, or Jamaica Almanack," for that year. He 
calculated die nativities of Charles I. the King of Sweden, and 
Sir Matthew Hale ; all which are in print. He styles Sir Matthew 
" the just and pious fccorpionist, as be was born under the celestial 
Scorpion." He Was very careful to do justice to a)} the constel- 
lations, particularly to that just mentioned, as appears from his 
" ObseqUium ftatiohabile ; or a reasonable Service performed for 
the celestial Sign Scorpio, in twenty remarkable Genitures of that 
glorious, but stigmatized Horoscope, against the malicious and 
raise Attempts of that grand (but fortunate) Impostor Mr. William 
Lilly."[ He was no less careful to do justice to the merit of his 
friend Mr. George Wharton, most of whose works he collected and 

* Id the bnok ii an astrological scheme, inscribed " lib. Cacti." 
t Wood, ii. cot. 686. 

t " Tibi bracbis eootnhit aidena 

Scorpiut, el cteli juiM pin) paile reliquit." — Vino. 



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OP. ENGLAND. «? 

published, in 1683, 8vo. He was living in 1696,* and was thought 
to be alive for many years after bis decease, as his name continued 
to be affixed to an almanack similar to that which was published in 
his lifetime. " The black. Life of John Gadbury" was written by 
Partridge. There are several beads of him, which belong to the 
reign of Charles II. 

GULIELMUS RAMESEY, gerierosus; nat. ci- 
pitat. Westmonast. 13 Mar. 1626-27. Crost sc. h.sh. 

Gulieimus Ramesf.y, generosus; 2Et. 24; a 
bust. 

William Ramesey was author of a chimerical book in vindication 
of astrology. This man did not look upon darkness as a privation 
of light, but as a real substance. He asserted that it is an emana- 
tion from dark stars, as light is from the sun. He even thought 
this absurdity supported by Scripture, where he read of " darkness 
over the land of Egypt, which may be felt ;**t not distinguishing 
betwixt the stated laws of nature, and the extraordinary agency of 
divine Providence; or, in other words, betwixt natural and super- 
natural darkness. The author of number 582 of the " Spectator," 
has made himself very merry with this profound writer, who thought 
himself far more sagacious than the rest of his astrological brethren. 
He appears tome to be the same person with Dr. William Ramesey, 
who was, perhaps, the most credulous and confident of all astro- 
logers. He was mad by the rules of his art, and promised himself 
great affluence of fortune, and much conjugal felicity ; but died 
poor in a gaol, and had such a termagant for his wife as provoked 
him to write, " Conjugium Conjurgium," which appears to have 
been written from his feelings.?. 

GULIELMUS WILLIAMS, alias Willjsum, 
nat. comitat. Gloc. Jam. 27, 1626; jthilosophus; 
M. 32. ; 

I am credibly informed that this print was copied from that of 
Christian Ravins, professor of Oriental languages at Amsterdam. 



J.gil zed by GOOgle 



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Pub tyMRuhordfonMay/Jgoc ZFSfJtrand. 



OP ENGLAND. 61 

HENRY MASSINGBERD. Cross sc. k, sh. 
Copied by W. Richardson. 

This person was author of ft folio, entitled, "Council aiid 
Admonition to his Children;" Lond. 1656; to which his print is 
prefixed. 

Several authors on music in the next Class. 

RICHARDtJS ELTON, generosus Bristol, nee 
nonartis militaris magister, Ann. 1649, Ml. 39. </. 
Droeshout sc. h. sh. 

Under the print are eight verses, which I shall transcribe, ss 
they may serve as a specimen of the encomiums which have been 
formerly lavished upon authors, whose works are now used for 
waste paper. 

" If Rome urilo her conqu'ring C»sars raise 
Rich obelisks, to crown their deathless praise ; 
What monument to thee must Albion rear. 
To r. hew thy motion in a brighter sphere ? 
This art', too dull to do't; 'tis only done 
Best hy thyself: bo lights the world the sun. 
We may admire tliy face, the sculptor's art. 
Bat He are extasy \{ at lb* inward part." 

Richard Elton was author of " A complete Body of the Art 
Military, being plain and perfect Directions for the ordering and 
framing of an Army, both of Horse and Foot : together with the 
Nfanner of Fortifications, and the Art of Gunnery ;" foi. to which 
his head is prefixed. I find by Clavel's " Catalogue," that this 
' t»ok was reprinted after the restoration. I need not inform the 
: reader, that the art of war has been almost, totally changed since 
the publication of this work. 

WILLIAM BARIFF, or Bariffb, M. 35; pre- 
j&ed to " Military Discipline " 1643; ito. Glover. 

William Barjffe, 2Et. 42 ; prefixed to the same. 

William Bariff; in armour; sash, tigc. Iji 
Ricraft. 



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v62 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

, WILLIAM BARIFFE, who, in the year 1642, m a major in 
Col. Hamden'a regiment* flourished during the Interregnum. He 
was author of a book of " Military Discipline," of which there have 
been several editions. The last edition was, I think, printed « 
folio, 1661. . j 



RIC. RAWLYNS. R.Gayiooodf. 1656; copied. 

. This person, who styles himself " Professor of Arithmetic in ; 
Great Yarmouth," waj! author of a practical treatise on that an, 
published in 1656, 8vo. before which is the head above described, 
engraved much in the manner of Hollar, of whom Gay wood was a 
disciple and imitator. 

THOMAS WILLSFORD, M. 46. R. Vaughan x. 
Under the print are four verses, signed M. Bolder. 

Thomas Willsford was author of a book in 8vo. called " Nature's 
Secrets, or the History of the Generation of Meteors," 1658; which 
he dedicates to the Lady Stafford, sister to Lord Henry Stafford. 
At the conclusion he signs himself " her affectinnate kinsman." 
M. Boteler, whose name is affixed to the lines at the bottom of the 
print, addresses a long copy of verses to his honoured uncle, upon 
his book of meteors. Thomas Willsford was also author, of a 
" Treatise of Arithmetic," in 8vo. His head, by Vaughan, is pre- 
fixed to both his books. Cocker, Leybourn, Hill, and others, hate 
much improved the art of arithmetic, since the two last-mentioned 
authors wrote on that subject. 

.. WILLIAM LILLY, student in astrology. Hollar/. 
12mo. 

"William Lilly, Ml. 57. Hollar/. 

William Lilly, student in astrology; copied 
from Hollar. 

William Lilly ; prefixed to his " Ephemeral' 
1650. 

• See the " Llit of the Anniei," published j igij. 



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OF ENGLAND. ' 63 

William Lilly; do. R.Gaywood. 
William Lilly; oval; do. Marshall. 

William-Lilly; half length; sitting at a table; 
to his " Christian Astrology" Marshall. 

William Lilly ; to his " Epkemeris" JR. Vaughan. 

William Lilly; in an oval ; between Cardan and 
Guido ; four verses. 

In the Askmolean Museum is his portrait, which was the pro- 
perty of the founder. It may be depended upon for the likeness. 

William Lilly was a native of Disewoith, in Leicestershire. He 
was, for several years, in the condition of a servant; but having 
the good luck to marry his masters widow, with a fortune of 1000/, 
be applied himself to the study of astrology. He made so great a 
proficiency, that in seven or eight weeks be perfectly understood 
how to set a figure. He intimates, that there was something su- 
pernatural in the progress he made in this art; as he tells us, that 
" be prayed for several weeks to those angels who were thought 
and believed by wise men to teach and instruct in all the several 
liberal sciences."* In 1647, he finished his book called "Christian 
Astrology ;" but has not any where signified that the angels lent 
him their assistance in that work ; nor does it appear that there is 
any thing in it more than the author Mmtelf was well able to per- 
form, t It is very certain that he regarded judicial astrology as a 
icience; and it is ,no less certain that he prostituted bis pen to the 
political purposes of the parliament and of Cromwell. I Astrolo- 
gical predictions and prophecies were perfectly suited to the enthu- 
siasm of these times ; and Lilly well knew how to apply them to 

* He say*, that " the angels very rarely apeak to any operator or muter; Hid 
when they do speak, it is like the Irish, much in the throat.'' — Lilly's " Life," by 
himself, p. 80, last edit. 

t There is before this book a good head of the author, hy Marshall. 

1. •' Wben Cromwell was in Scotland, a soldier Blood with Lillys (Merlinus) 
Anglicus in bis hand, and said, 'as the several troops pasted by him, ' Lo hear what 
Lilly saiih, yon are promised victory, fight It out, brave boys;' and then read that 
ninth's prediction.'' — "Life," p. 83. 



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64 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

the hopes and fears of the populace. He was frequently ambignoiu 
and oracular, and sometimes amused the people with hieroglyphics; 
many of which, ai we are told by Mr. Aubrey, he stole from an old 
monkish manuscript. Moore, the almanack -maker, has stolen se- 
veral from him; and there is no doubt but some future almanack- 
maker will steal them from Moore. Ob. June 9, 1681.* 

JOHN BOOKER ; oval ; in a cloak; a book in his 
hand; anonymous; scarce. 

John Booker, JEt. 46 j small. 

John Booker. Hollar f. 12nw. 

John Booker was bred a haberdasher ; f but quitted this em- 
ployment, and followed that of a writing-master, at Hadley, in 
Middlesex. He in a few years rendered himself so eminent, that 
he was appointed licenser of mathematical books ; under which 
were included all those that related to the celestial sciences. Lilly 
tells us, that he once thought him the, greatest astronomer in the 

" Lilly, though known to be in impostor,! hid, however, a pension of 10W. 
a year conferred on turn by the council of stale. The loyalist* treated hira 
Kith ridicule and contempt. He is the Sidrophel of Butler : and Sir John Bidwa- 
head, in his "Paul's Church -Yard," J utilizes, bis almanack, where be mention 
" Merlinui Anglicus, the Art of discovering all that never was, and all that neia 
Shall be." Gataker, who well know the futility of his art, calis him " blind bus- 
s*rd."|| He seeioi to have been checked by no scruples in promoting the rebellion; 
■nd indeed tells us himself, thai he " cpgaged body and soul in the came of tse 
parliament"* 

The Life of Lilly, by himself, together with his Life of Charles I. and that of ail 
friend Ashmole, written by that author by way of diary, have, as they were become 
very scarce, been lately republished by Thomas Daviea. "A full Answer to ■ 
confused mixture of false, traitorous, and contradictory Observations on Ibe life 
and Actions of toe hte King Charies, published by William Lilly, in July, tool." 
js one of the " Historical Discourses" of Sir Edward Walker, 1705, fol. 

t So Lilly informs us; but Mr. Wood says, that he was bred a clerk under a 
alderman of London t this alderman ins probably a haberdasher. 

X SeeTborloeV'StatePBpera,"v.4SI. 

$ This pamphlet is a facetious satire upon various books well known at this line. 
and supposed to be sold in St. Paul's Church-yard. 

(| Gataker a Notes on the Id Verse of the X. Chapter of Jeremiah, in the " As- 
aero hly's Annotations." 

•I Lilly's "Life," p. 43. 



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OF ENGLAND. 65 

world ; but it appears that he afterward sunk in hii esteem, and 
that he thought himself a much greater man. We are told by the 
- same author, that " he had a curious fancy in judging of thefts, 
and as successful in resolving love questions," which was a capital 
branch of his trade. George Wharton, who was formerly one of 
his astrological friends, bad a great quarrel with him, which occa- 
sioned his publishing, " Mercurio-coslico Masthc; or an Anti-caveat 
to all such as have heretofore had the misfortune to be cheated and 
deluded by that great and traJterous impostor, John Booker; in an 
Answer to his frivolous Pamphlet, entitled, Mercurius Ccelicus, or 
a Caveat to all the People of England ;" Oxen. 1 644 ; 4to. The 
only work of Booker, worth the reader's notice, is bis " Bloody 
Irish Almanack," which contains some memorable particulars rela- 
tive to the war in Ireland. Ob. April, 1667. 

CAPTAIN GEORGE WHARTON; six verses, 
" Here the true Counterfeit" <§"C. This print may be 
placed in the preceding reign. 

George Wharton; sixverses, "Wise Nature," fyc. 

George Wharton, by Faitkorne; siv verses, " Who 
views," cjc. 

George Wharton was descended from a genteel family in West- 
moreland. He' spent the greatest part of his patrimony in the service 
of Charles I. for whom he raised a 6ne troop of horse, which he 
commanded in person. When he could no longer keep the field, 
he retired to his studies, which he pursued with uncommon appli- 
cation ; particularly that of astrology, to which he had a strong and 
early propensity. His progress in this art was suitable to his pas- 
sion for it ; and he was looked upon by the royalists as equal, at 
least, to Lilly and Booker, of whom he was the rival and antagonist. 
He was author of Almanacks, Mercuries, and several astronomical 
pieces. We are indebted to him for a chronology of the battles, 
sieges, and other remarkable occurrences of the civil war, since 
printed, with many additions, in the " Historian's Guide," and of 
late years in Salmon's " Chronological Historian." He had a 
knack of versifying, which he exercised in little sallies of drollery 
and satire, which are interspersed with his astrological works. 



3d ^ Google 



60 BIOGRAPHIC 

JAMES HARRINGT 

ginal picture in the possess 
Bessingby, in Yorkshire. 

James Harrington, 
arms; 1658; ito. 

Sir James Harringi 
thorne sc. Ato. in an octag 

James Harrington. \ 

James Harrington. J 

This political projector was an 
" The Commonwealth of Ocean 
plan for an everlasting republic, 
kept up by rotation. There is g 
is, in many instances, as refined, 
as the " Republic" of Plato, or tt 
who was a great visionary, was 
it put in execution. Baxter's "B 
levelled at this political romance 
a great contempt for that perfoi 
a serious answer to it ; but affi 
cavalier manner, in a half shee 
editions of Harrington's works 1 
Ob. II Sept. 1677. See Kathj) 

ROBERT LOVEDAY 

tidamant? Faithorne sc. 8 
.before his *' Letters " 165J 

Robert Loveday was translate 
patra," and author of a book of 
were in good esteem. It appeal 
upper servant in Lord C.'s familj 
Interregnum. There is a fanuli 
intimates that the author neve 
public. 



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a i b ,. Google 



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J'ui tyWjcMarJfinMayl.leoc 11'3tjtrend, 



OF ENGLAND. 61 

HENRY MASSINGBERD. Cross sc. h, sh. 
Copied by W. Richardson. 

This person vtas author of it folio, entitled, " Council and 
Admonition to his Children ;" Lond. 1656 ; to which hi* print is 
prefixed. 

Several authors on music in the next Class. 

RICHARDUS ELTON, generosus Bristol, nee 
son artis militaris magister, Ann. 1649, JEt. 39. J. 
Droeshout sc. h. sh. 

Under the print are eight verses, which I shall transcribe, as 
they may serve as a specimen of the encomiums which have been 
formerly lavished upon authors, whose works are now used for 
waste paper. 

" If Roma unto her conqu'ripg Caesars raise 
Rich obelisks, to crown their deathlesa praise ; 
What monument to thee &Mt Albion roar. 
To iliow rliy motion in a brighter aphero ? • 
This, art's too dull to do't; 'tis onij done 
But by thyself: 10 lights the world the ion. 
We may admire thy face, (he sculptor's art. 
But we MB extnty'd at th" inward part." 

Richard Elton was author of " A complete Body of the Art 
Military, being plain and perfect Directions for the ordering and 
framing of an Army, both of Horse and Foot : together with the 
Manner of Fortifications, and the Art of Gunnery ;" fol. to which 
his head is prefixed. I find by Clavel's " Catalogue, 1 ' that this 
book was reprinted after the restoration. I need not inform the 
reader, that the art of war has been almost totally changed since 
the publication of this work. 

WILLIAM BAR1FF, or Bariffe, M. 35; pre- 
fixed 'to " Military Discipline" 1643; ito. Glover. 

William Bariffe, JEt. 42 ; prefixed to the same. 

William Babif'f; in armour; sash, c^c. In 
Ricrafi. 



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,62 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

. WILLIAM BARIFFE, who, in the year 1642, was a major in 
Col. Hamden'a regiment,* flourished during the Interregnum. H^ 
was author of a book of" Military Discipline," of which there have 
been several editions. Tbe last edition was, I think, printed in 
folio, 1661. 

RIC. RAWLYNS. R. Garwood/. 1656 ; copied. 

This penon, who styles himself " Professor of Arithmetic in 
Great Yarmouth," was author of a practical, treatise on that art, 
published in 1656, 8vo. before which is the head above described 1 , 
engraved much in the manner of Hollar, of whom Gaywood was a 
disciple and imitator. 

THOMAS WILLSFORD, M. 46. R. Vaughan sc. 
Under the print are four verses, signed M. Boteler. 

Thomas Willsford was author of a book Id 8vo. called " Nature's 
Secrets, or the History of the Generation of Meteors," 1658; which 
he dedicates to the Lady Stafford, sister to Lord Henry Stafford. 
At the conclusion he signs himself " her affectionate kinsman." 
M. Boteler, whose name is affixed to the lines at the bottom of the 
print, addresses a long copy of verses to his honoured uncle, upon 
his book of meteors. Thomas Willsford was also author of a 
" Treatise of Arithmetic," in 8vo. His head, by Vaughan, is pre- 
fixed to both his books. Cocker, Leybourn, Hill, and others, have 
much improved the art of arithmetic, siuce the two last- mentioned 
authors wrote on that subject. 

WILLIAM LILLY, student in astrology. Hollar/. 
\2mo. 

William Lilly, Mt. 57. Hollar/. 

William Lilly, student in astrology; copkd 
front Hollar. 

William Lilly ; prefixed to his " Ephemcris? 
1650. 

* See Ibe "Lilt ofthe Artniei," published in 1613. 



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' OF ENGLAND. • C3 

William Lilly; do. R.Gaywood. 
William Lilly; oval; do. Marshall. 

William Lilly; half length; sitting at a table; 
to his " Christian Astrology" Marshall. 

William Lilly ; to his " Ephemeris." R. Vaughan. 

William Lilly; in an oval ; bettoeen Cardan and 
Guido ; four verses. 

In the Asbmoleaii Museum is his portrait, which was the pro- 
perty of the founder. It may be depended upon for the likeness. 

William Lilly was a native of Diseworth, in Leicestershire. He 
was, for several years, in the condition of a servant ; but having 
the good luck to marry his master's widow, with a fortune of 10001. 
he applied himself to the study of astrology. He made so great a 
proficiency, that in seven or eight weeks he perfectly understood 
how to set a figure. He intimates, that there was something su- 
pernatural in the progress he made in this art; as he tells ns, that 
" he prayed for several weeks to those angels who were thought 
and believed by wise men to teach and instruct in all the several 
liberal sciences."* In 1647, he finished his book called " Christian 
Astrology;" but has not anywhere signified that the angels lent 
him their assistance in that work ; nor does it appear that there is 
any thing in it more than the author himself was well able to per- 
form, t It is very certain that he regarded judicial astrology as a 
science ; and it is no less certain that he prostituted his pen to the 
political purposes of the parliament and of Cromwell, t Astrolo- 
gical predictions and prophecies were perfectly suited to the enthu- 
siasm of these times ; and Lilly well knew how to apply them to 

* He says, that " the angels very rarely speak to any operator or master; and 
Then they do apeak, it is like the Irish, much in the throat."— Lilly's " Life," bj 
himself, p. 88, last edit. 

t There is before thia book a good head of the author, l>y Marshall. 

% •' When Cromwell waa in Scotland, a soldier stood wilh Lilly's (Merijnui) 
Ariglicua in bis hand, and said, as (he several troops paasedby him, ' Lo hear what 
Lilly with, you are promised victory, fight it out, brave boy) ;' and then read that 
■onlb'i prediction." — " Life," p. S3. 



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64 BIOGRAPHIQAL HISTORY 

the hopes and fears of the populace. He was frequently ambiguous 
and oracular, and sometimes amused the people with hieroglyphics; 
many of which, as we are told by Mr. Aubrey, he stole from an old 
monkish manuscript. Moore, the almanack-maker, has stolen se- 
veral from him ; and there is no doubt but some future almanack - 
'maker will steal them from Moore. Ob. June 9, 1681.* 

JOHN BOOKER; oval- x in a cloak; a book in hit 
hand; anonymous; scarce. 

John Booker, JEt. 46; small. 

John Booker. Hollar f. V2.mo. 

John Booker was bred a haberdasher ; f but quitted this em- 
ployment, and followed that of a writing-master, at Hadley, in 
Middlesex. He in a few years rendered himself so eminent, that 
he was appointed licenser of mathematical books ; under which 
were included all those that related to the celestial science*. Lilly 
tells us, that he once thought him the greatest astronomer in the 

* Lilly, though known to be nn impostor,! had, however, a pension of 1001. 
a year conferred on htm by the council of state. The royalists treated him 
with ridicule and contempt. He ii (he Sidrophel of Bailer : and Sir John Birken- 
head, in his "Paul's Church-Yard,"} satirizes his almanack, where he mentions 
" Mertinus Anglicus, the Art of discovering all that never was, and all that neta 
shall be." Gataker, who well knew the futility of bis art, calts him " blind boi- 
xard."H He seems to have been checked by no scruples in promoting the lebetikn; 
■nd indeed tells as himself, that he " engaged body and sonl in the cause of the 



The Life or Lilly, by himself, together with his Life of Charles I. and that of ha 
friend Aihmole, written by that author by way of diary, have, as they were become 
very scarce, been lately republished by Thomas Davics. "A fall Answer to a 
confused mixture of false, traitorous, and contradictory Observations on the Life 
■nd Actions of .the late King Charles, published by William Lilly, in July, 1651," 
is one of the " Historical Discourses" of Sir Edward Walker, 1705. fid. 

< So Lilly informs us; but Mr. Wood says, that he was bred a clerk under aa 
alderman of London : this alderman was probably a haberdasher. 

1 See Tburloe's '• State Papers," v. 431. 

$ This pamphlet is a facetious satire upon various books well known at (his time, 
and supposed to be sold in St. Paul's Church-yard. 

U Gataker a Notes on the td Verse of the X. Chapter of Jeremiah, in Hi* " if 

1 Lilly's "Life," p. 45. 



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OP ENGLAND. 65 

world ; but it appears that he afterward mink in his esteem, and 
that he thought himself a much greater man. We are told by the 
same author, that " he had a curious fancy in judging of thefts, 
and as successful in resolving love questions," which was a capital 
branch of his trade. George Wharton, who was formerly one of 
his astrological friends, had a great quarrel with him, which occa- 
sioned his. publishing, " Mercurio-coelico Mastix; or an Anti-caveat 
to ail such as have heretofore had the misfortune to be cheated and 
deluded by that great and traiterous impostor, John Booker; in an 
Answer, to his frivolous Pamphlet, entitled, Mercurius Crelicus, or 
a Caveat to all the People of England;" Oxon. 1644; 4to. The 
only work of Booker, worth the reader's notice, is his " Bloody 
Irish Almanack," which contains some memorable particulars rela- 
tive to the war in Ireland. Ob. April, 1667. 

CAPTAIN GEORGE WHARTON; six verses, 
"Here the true Counterfeit" <§:c. This print may be 
placed in the preceding reign. 

George Wharton; six verses, "Wise Nature" 8;c. 

George Wharton, by Fatthorne; siv verses, " Who 
views," <§r. 

George Wharton was descended from a genteel family in West- 
moreland. He spent the greatest, part of his patrimony in the service 
of Charles 1. for whom he raised a fine troop of horse, which be 
commanded in person. When he could no longer keep the field, 
he retired to bis studies, which he pursued with uncommon appli- 
cation ; particularly that of astrology, to which be had a strong and 
early propensity. His progress in this art was suitable to his pas- 
sion for it ; and he was looked upon by the royalists as equal, at 
least, to Lilly and Booker, of whom he was the rival and antagonist. 
He was author of Almanacks, Mercuries, and several astronomical 
pieces. We are indebted to him for a chronology of the battles, 
sieges, and other remarkable occurrences of the civil war, since 
printed, with many additions, in the " Historian's Guide," and of 
late years in Salmon's " Chronological Historian," He had a 
knack of versifying, which he exercised in little sallies of drollery 
and satire, which are interspersed with his astrological works. 



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GO BIOGliAP«rCAL nfSTORY 

Upon the restoration he was appointed treasurer and paymaster 
of the ordnance, and created a baronet, which set him above the 
profession of an author. The name of Nauorth, the anagram of 
Wharton, is sometimes prefixed to his almanacks. Ob, 12 Aug. 
1681. See the reign of Charles II. 

JOHANNES GADBURIUS, philomath, natus 
comitat. Oxon. An. 1627. .££.31. T. Cross sc. Over 
fits head are the sun, moon, and stars; his left hand rests 
on a celestial globe, and the book of Heaven is open be- 
fore him.* — The p?'int is before his " Doctrine of Na- 
tivities," 1658; /of. 

Johannes Gadburius. Cross sc. 12mo. 

John Gadbury, who served an apprenticeship with a tailor at 
Oxford, left that occupation, and pursued the vehement inclination 
he had to astrology. He learned much of bis art from Lilly, under 
whom be profited to such a degree, that he was soon enabled " to 
set up the trade of almanack-making and fortune-telling for him- 
self ."t His pen was employed for many years on nativities, alma- 
ttach, and prodigies. Other astrologers were content to exercise 
their art for the benefit of their own country only, but Gadbury 
extended his to a remote part of the globe ; as, in 1674, lie pub- 
lished his " West India, or Jamaica Almanack," for that year, fie 
calculated the nativities of Charles I. the King of Sweden, and 
Sir Matthew Hale ; all which are in print. He Styles Sir Matthew 
" the just and pious Scorpionist, as he was horn under the celestial 
Scorpion." He was very careful to do justice to all the constel- 
lations, particularly to that just mentioned, as appears from his 
" Obscquium Rationabile; or a reasonable Service performed for 
the celestial Sign Scorpio, in twenty remarkable Genitures of that 
glorious, but stigmatized Horoscope, against the malicious and 
raise Attempts of that grand (but fortunate) Impostor Mr. William 
Lilly. "x He was no less careful to do justice to the merit of his 
friend Mr. George Wharton, most Of whose works he collected and 

* In (he book ii an abuological scheme, inscribed " Lib. Cceli." 
t Wood, ii. col. 666. 

j •• Tibi bnobis contnbit ardens 

Scorpiui, el cceli juiln phu psile reliquU.' 1 — Vino. 



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OF ENGL AMD. «* 

published, In 1683, 8to. He was living in 1899,* and was thought 
to be alive for many years after his decease, as Ms name continue* 
to be affixed to an almanack similar to that, which was published in 
his lifetime. " The black Life of John Gadbury" was written by 
Partridge. There are several heads of hint, which belong to the 
reign of Charles II. 

GULIELMUS RAMESEY, generosus; nat. ci- 
pftat. Westmonast. 13 Mar. 1626-27. Crm sc. h.sk. 

Gulielmus Ramesey, generosus ; J3.24; a 
bust. 

William Ramesey was author of a chimerical book in vindication 
of astrology. This man did not look npon darkness as a privation 
of light, but as a real substance. He asserted that it is an emana- 
tion from dark stars, as light is from the sun. He even thought 
this absurdity supported by Scripture, where he read of " darkness 
over the land of Egypt, which may be felt ;"t not distinguishing 
betwixt the stated laws of nature, and the extraordinary agency of 
divine Providence; or, in other words, betwixt natural and super- 
natural darkness. The author of number 582 of the " Spectator," 
has made himself very merry with this profound writer, who thought 
himself far more sagacious than the rest of his astrological brethren. 
He appears to me to be the same person with Dr. William Ramesey, 
who was, perhaps, the most credulous and confident of all astro- 
logers. He was mad by the rules of his art, and promised himself 
great affluence of fortune, and much conjugal felicity ; but died 
poor in a gaol, and had such a termagant for his wife as provoked 
him to write, " Conjugium Conjurgium," which appears to have 
been written from his feelings.! 

GULIELMUS WILLIAMS, alias Willisuw, 
Ml. comitat. Gloc. Janu. 27, 1626; pkilosopkus; 
M. 32. 

I am credibly informed that this print was copied from that of 
Christian Ravius, professor of Oriental languages at Amsterdam. 

* See ■' Aihen. Oion." ii. col. 1051. t -Eiod. t. tl. 

See Dr. Rmuu'ii snick in the ceigo of Charles II.. 



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Gh BIOGRAPHICAL HTSTORY 

Upon the restoration he was appointed treasurer and paymaster 
of the ordnance, and created a baronet, which set him above lie 
profession of an author. The name of Naworth, the anagram of 
IVharton, is sometimes prefixed to his almanacks. Ob. 12 Aug. 
1681. See the reign of ChaklKs II. 

JOHANNES GADBURIUS, philomath, natus 
comitat. Oxon. An. 1627. M. 31. T. Cross sc. Over 
his head are the sun, moon, and stars ; his left hand rests 
on a celestial globe, and the book of Heaven is open be- 
fore him." — The print is before his " Doctrine of Na- 
tivities" 1658; fol. 

Johannes Gadbubius. Cross sc. Vhno. 

John Gadbury, who served an apprenticeship with a tailor at 
Oxford, left that occupation, and pursued the vehement inclination 
he bad to astrology. He learned much of his art from Lilly, under 
whom he profited to such a degree, that he was soon enabled " to 
set up the trade of almanack -making and fortune-telling for him- 
self, "t His pen Was employed for many years on nativities, atma- 
tmckt, and prodigie*. Other astrologers were content to exercise 
their art for the benefit of their own country only, but Gadbury 
extended his to a remote-part of the globe ; as, in 1674, he pub- 
lished his " West India, or Jamaica Almanack," for that year. He 
(calculated die nativities of Charles I. the King of Sweden, and 
Sir Matthew Hale ; all which are in print He styles Sir Matthew 
" the just and pious Scorpionist, as he was horn under the celestial 
Scorpion." He Was very careful to do justice to all the constel- 
lations, particularly to that just mentioned, as appears from his 
«« Obsequium Rationabife; or a reasonable Service performed for 
the celestial Sign Scorpio, in twenty remarkable Getu'tnres of that 
glorious, but stigmatized Horoscope, against the malicious and 
false Attempts of that grand (but fortunate) Impostor Mr. William 
Lilly."! He was no less careful to do justice to the merit of hit 
friend Mr. George Wharton, most of whose works he collected! and 

*' \o llie book Ii an oncological tcheme, inscribed " Lib. Cieli." 
t Wood, ii, cot. H86. 

( _■ ■■ '■ Tibi brocbia conlrahil ardent 

Scotpiui, el coll Ja»U pirn pwle ■reliqiiit."* — Vino. 



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OF. ENGLAND- •? 

published, in 1683, 8to. He was living in 1899,* and was thought 
to be alive For many years after bis decease, as his name continued 
to be affixed to an almanack similar to that which was published in 
his lifetime. " The Hack life of John Gadbury" was written by 
Partridge. There are several heads of hint, which belong to the 
reign of Charles II. 

GUXIELMUS RAMESEY, gerierosus ; nat. ci- 
pitat. Westmonast. 13 Mar. 1626-27. Croat ac. h.ah. 

Gui.ielmus Ramesey, generosus ; 2Et. 24 ; a 
bust. 

. William Ramesey was author of a chimerical book in vindication 
of astrology. This man did not look upon darkness as a privation 
of light, but as a real substance. He asserted that it is an emana- 
tion from dark stars, as light is from the sua. He even thought 
this absurdity supported by Scripture, where he read of "darkness 
over the land of Egypt, which may be felt ;"+ not distinguishing 
betwixt the stated laws of nature, and the extraordinary agency of 
divine Providence; or, in other words, betwixt natural and super- 
natural darkness. The author of number 582 of the " Spectator," 
has made himself very merry with this profound writer, who thought 
himself far more sagacious than the rest of his astrological brethren. 
He appears to me to be the same person with Dr. William Ramesey, 
who was, perhaps, the most credulous and confident of all astro- 
logers. He was mad by the rules of bis art, and promised himself 
great affluence of fortune, and much conjugal felicity ; but died 
poor in a gaol, and had such a termagaut for his wife as provoked 
him to write, " Conjugium Conjurgium," which appears to have 
been written from his feelings.* 

GUL1ELMUS WILLIAMS, alias Wilijsum, 
nat. comitat. Gloc. Janu. 27, 1626; phitoaophns; 
M. 32. 

I am credibly informed that this print was copied from that of 
Christian Ravius, professor of Oriental languages at Amsterdam. 

» See "Allien. Oxon."ii. col. 1051. t Ejod. i. «. 

Sec Dr. llmm.Y'i uticie in the reign of Charles II.. 



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68 BIOGRAPHICAL-HISTORY 

William Williams waa an astrologer of inferior note, of which 
many flourished at this period, and after the restoration. The 
respect (hen paid to astrologers, by the generality of men of learning, 
was equal to the contempt they lie under at present.* Some 
among the vulgar beheld them with rude admiration, and thought 
that an order of men who were familiarly acquainted with the stars, 
and privy to the decrees of Heaven, were in the highest degree re- 
spectable. Others, who looked upon their art as sorcery, regarded 
them with horror and detestation. The while viitchu were com- 
monly thought to be masters of the black art ; but were supposed to 
have too much probity to put it in practice* 

ROBERT MAY, JEt. 71, 1660; sir verses, "What 
wouldst thou view" fyc. Before his "Accomplished Cook" 
1660; 8vo. (Gaywood.) 

Robert May, who was son of a cook retained by the old Lady 
Dormer, was, at her expense, sent over to France, to improve him- 
self in the art of cookery. Upon his return to England, he was 
bound apprentice to Arthur Hollings worth, cook to the grocers' 
company and the Star-chamber. Upon his leaving his master, he 
entered into the service of Lady Dormer, who kept four cooks be- 
sides our author and his father. " Such notable bouses (says he) 
were then kept, the glory of that, and the shame of the present 
age : then were those golden days wherein were practised the 
triumphs and trophies of cookery : then was hospitality esteemed, 
neighbourhood preserved, the poor cherished, and God honoured." 
After the decease of the hospitable Lady Dormer, he served the 
Lord Castlehaven, and several others of the nobility and gentry ; 
and was, in 1659, when he put the last hand to his book, in the' 
service of Lady Englefield. The author's fundamental principle 
seems to be, to make things palatable with any ingredients, or at any 
expense. This has been followed by a multitude of other writers on 
cookery ; and is indeed apparent in every book or) that art, from 
the " Queen's Closet opened," down to the last of the modern sys- 
tems. He has given us a handsome bill of fare for Lent, which 

* The famous Mr. Joseph Mede spent much of hit time in (he Bind y of nslrologj ; 
and (he moat valuable of Lilly's »slrologic«l books belonged to (he exceileiK Bishop 
Bedell, wlime " Life" was written by Dr. Rumci. See Lilly's •' Life," p. 93, edit 
ITU. 



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- - -OF- ENGLAND. 69 

consists of sixteen articles in the first course, and as many in the ■ 
second. The pudding branch has been greatly improved by our 
late writers, one of whom has published one hundred different re- 
ceipts for puddings. Our author May has wholly omitted to treat 
of the mystery of carving, which is anatomically discussed in seve- 
ral subsequent treatises; in one or two of which is a set of rules 
for doing the honours of the table. — See more of this man in the 
account of him before his book.* . - r 

SIR ROBERT GORDON, of Straloch; from an 
original painting in the College of Aberdeeen. Trotter sc. 
8t». - , ■ ■■ '■ 

Sir Robert Gordon, of Straloch. Harding ex'c. 
8t». ...:.. • 

Sir Robert Gordon, an eminent Scottish antiquarian, was* author 
of the following works : 1. Several Latin topographical and anti- 
quarian essays, published in Blaw'a Atlas of Scotland, 1656. The 
Dutch editor thought proper to insert Buchanan's treatise, De Jure 
Ri-gm, supposed to be a democratic, but really an aristocratic, per- 
formance, if viewed practically, as it prefers a senate and nobles, as 
in Venice, to kings ; bat points out no new organ of the popular 
voice. And he dedicated the work to Cromwell, while Sir Robert 
had inscribed it to Charles II. as the dedication itself, afterward in 
the hands of his son James Gordon, parson of Rothimay, was pro- 
duced to shew. — Of this great work Sir John Scott, of Scotstarvet, 
was the projector, and bore the expense : the maps were drawn by 
Timothy Pant, under the direction of the ministers, as ordered by 
the General Assembly ; most of the descriptions are by Sir Robert 
Gordon. It is remarkable the county of Angus is omitted. ' 

2. Origo et procetsui familue fflustritsima Gorclianormn in Scotia, a 
4to. MS.of about nine sheets, extending to the year 1596, com- 
posed in. his seventieth year, or perhaps translated from the MS, 
history of the family of Gordon, by Sir Robert Gordon, of Gordon - 

■ The author of the *' School of Insiruction for the Officers of ihe Mouth," 
ImirUbed si the samp time with May. He excelled all liis contemporariei in 
folding of mpkitu. See the print) in his book, which exhibit them under ■ great 
nriety of fomu. This practice Continued fur many yean. It seems lo haye re- 
quired almost as much time u dressing an elegant dinner. 



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W BIOGRAfHrCAL. HISTORY 

•ton, whs also Wrote «i account of tike fiimiry of Sutherland, aw* 
died in 1656. 

X Epittoia ad Davidem Buchanammt de Siiioricu Scoticis: pub- 
lished by Hearne in the Prolegomena to Leland'a Collectanea, and 
several manuscript letters and papers preserved in the Advocate's 
Library, and other repositories. 

The dates of Sir Robert's birth and death do not appear, but he 
wrote in full rigour in the time of Chants I. 



AN IRISH AUTHOR. 

JACOBUS WAREUS, eq. aurat.&c. tertuetc. 
h. sh. Before his Works. 

Sir James Wake. Thane. 

■ Sir James Ware, auditor. general of Irelaad, and one of the 
privy council in that kingdom, in the reigns of Charles I. and 11. 
was one of the most able and industrious antiquaries of his time. 
The grand object of his researches was the history and antiquities 
of his own country; for which he made very copious collections, 
and on which he published several estimable pieces. One of the 
most considerable of his writings is bis book " De Hibernia et Antt- 
quitatibus ejus, Disquisitiones," 8vo. ; of which two editions were 
published during the Interregnum. His son, Robert Ware, esq. 
translated all his works that have any relation to the kingdom of 
Ireland, and published them in one volume folio, 1705. This 
edition is improved to three volumes in folio, by Walter Harris, esq. 
The learned and industrious author, who was the Camden of his 
Age and nation, died at Dublin, the lstof December, 1666. His 
valuable collection of manuscripts, which were purchased by Henry, 
earl of Clarendon, were by him brought into England, and deli- 
vered into the custody of Dr. Tenison, when he was vicar of St 
Martin's in the Fields. There is a catalogue of them in print, bj 
Edm. Gibson, B. A. afterward bishop of London. 



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' 0? fiNGLA&D. : tl 

CLASS X. 

ARTISTS, &c. 

PAINTERS OF HISTORY, &c. 

ISAAC FULLER, ipse p. T. Chambars sc. Inthl 
"Anecdotes of Painting ,*" 4to. — There is a good por- 
trait of him, by himself, in the Picture Gallery at 
Oxford. 

Fuller was a disciple of Francis Perrier, who etched the antique 
statues and bas-reliefs. He was as excellent in portrait, as he 
was deficient in history. He painted the altar-pieces at All Souls 
and Magdalen College, in Oxford ; both which are very indifferent 
performances. He has, in the latter, imitated the Last Judgment 
of Michael Aogelo, in which he has not succeeded. There is in the 
picture by that celebrated master a wildness of invention ; but ii 
is the wildness of a great and irregular genius : Fuller's has more 
of the wildness of a dream. His colouring is harsh and unnatural. 
Mr. Addison has written a beautiful Latin poem on this perfor- 
mance, in which he has shewn himself a better painter than Fuller. 
He has described what it should be, not what it is,* Ob. cut, 
1676. 

PETER LELY, a German, who came into England in the late 
reign, painted the pictures of Charles I. and of Cromwell. He 
practised history, landscape, and portrait; but soon abandoned 
the two former branches, and cultivated only the latter; in which 

* Fuller hat introduced into this picture the portrait of an hostler trial lived at 
the Grejhonnd Inn, at Oxford, who ia laid to hale offended him, and to hare been 
therefore placed among the damned. This teems to be in conformity with Michael 
Angclo, who hai introduced. into hit Last Judgment a very ridiculous portrait of 
*'■ pope'i master of the ceremoniea, in li ridiculous a situation. t The painter of 
<ue "fat wirldo* of the church of Fairford, in Gloucestershire, has, perhaps, for ■ 
1'ke rcaion, exhibited, in Mi piece of the Resurrection, a devil driving an old wo- 
■•u into hell in a wheel-barroir. 

t The figure U at the bottom of the piece, and ia known by i*s skats' en*. Sec 
ftrcnirrlson'j " Account of Statues," &c. p. 171, second edit. 



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72 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

he succeeded. He became the painter in rogue after the resto- 
ration. See the reign of Charles. IL 

ROBERT US WALKER, pictor ; se ipse p. Lm- 
bart sc. h.sk. 

Robertus Walkeb. T. Chambars sc. In the 
''Anecdotes of Painting;" copied from the above print. 

The original portrait is at Belvoir Castle. There is another of 
him, by himself, in the Picture Gallery, in Oxford- 
Robert Walker, a good painter of portraits, did those, of Crom- 
well, and many of the parliament generals. The Grand Duke of 
Tuscany gave 500/. for a picture of the Protector by his hand. 
This was in the possession of a gentlewoman who was related to 
him, and who asked that sum for it because she was determined 
not to sell it. When the money was paid by the Grand Duke'* 
agent, she parted from it with regret. Mr. Mbson tells us, in hit 
" Travels," that this portrait, and that of Thomas, oarl of Ossory, 
were the only pictures of Englishmen in the Gallery of illustrious 
Generals at Florence. This artist died soon after the restoration. 

EDVARDUS MASCALL, pictor; ipse p. J. Gam- 
mon sc. 4to. 

Edward Mascall; in the print with Gentileschi, 
in Lord OrforcTs ''Painters." 

Edward Mascal painted portraits at the time of the Interregnum, 
but rose to no great eminence in his art. 



MAJOR-GENERAL LAMBERT. Bannermansc. 
In the "Anecdotes of Painting;' 4to. 

Lambert, sitting painting; se ipsepinxit. J.Smith 
fee. 1697. I was credibly informed by one of tbe 
family residing in Oxfordshire, and who is in pos- 
session of the original picture, that it is General i 



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OF ENGLAND. 73 

Lambert. It certainly is not Lambert the landscape 
painter, as classed by Bromley. 

Major-general Lambert took up the pencil for his amusement, 
after Cromwell had wrested the sword from his hand. He painted 
flowers, which he was fond of cultivating. He is supposed to have 
learned his art of Baptist Caspars. 

The arts, which flourish best under an accomplished and muni- 
Scent monarch, in time of peace, seemed to be almost totally ex- 
tinct during the republican government. They could scarcely be 
said to revive after the restoration of Charles II. 

THOMAS SIMON ; a small oval by Vertuc, in his 
volume of the " Works of the Simons," plate xxxv. 

Thomas Simon, who was formed in England by Briot, a cele- 
brated French medalist, rivalled the classic artists of antiquity. 
He and bis master were retained in the service of Charles I. but 
almost all the capital works of the former were executed during 
the protectorate of Cromwell, the dies for whose crown,* half- 
crown, shilling, and sixpence, were exquisitely cut by him, as were 
also his great seal, and that of the Commonwealth. His trial-piece 
of the crown of Charles II. shews to equal advantage the excellence 
of his hand. He was sometimes assisted by his brother Abraham, 
the ingenious modeller in wax, of whom there is an account in the 
reign of Charles. 

MR. JOHN LUCAS ; a small head, in the fron- 
tispiece to Winstanley's " Loyal Marty rology,"' 1665; 
Svo. 

• This piece, which has about the edge a motlo from Terence, " Hisf nhi pe- 
rilums roihi adimat nemo," is scarce. It Sold, "Credite, pusteri!" at the lata 
Mr. West's ale. Tar filU. I. who know not who was the purchaser, and therefore 
•in ibsolutely free from personal prejudice, cannot belp observing, that be appear* 
ic be far gone in the frenzy of the virtu. Dr. H • ", though a virtuoso himself, 
*oii!d, surely, in this instance, have pronounced him insane, if he had given only a 
quarrer of the money- 
It should be observed, that though the information of (he fact mentioned in this 
ante, came to me from a very good hand, I have, since it was printed, been told 11 
is. >t least, questionable. 

t Sell. Ang. Scot, et Hib. which are in the legend of the obverse. V. Terertt 



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74 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

Mr. John Lucas ; enlarged from the print above; 
&vo. 

, Mr. John Lucas, a mercer of very good estate and reputation at 
Hungerford, in Berkshire, was one of the loyal adventurers that, 
joining with Penruddock, Grove, and others, at Salisbury, in their 
unsuccessful attempt to restore Charles the Second, was taken pri- 
soner by the republican troops, brought to trial, found guilty, and 
lost his head in 1655. 

ROBERT VAUGHAN; ./rem a drawing in the 
possession of Mr. Robert Grave, formerly Mr. William 
Oldys\ R. Grave, jun. sc. Svo. 

Robert Vaughan was a native of England, and one of those in- 
different engravers, whose labours were confined to the ornament- 
ing (if such a word may be properly used upon the occasion) of 
books. We know little of his life; but Vertue informs ns, from 
Ashmole's manuscript, that during the Interregnum, he engraved a 
print of Charles the Second ; to which he added so offensive an in- 
scription, that an accusation was preferred against him for ft after 
the restoration ; but of what consequence it was to Vaughan we are 
not told. Among his works are the prints for Norton's Ordinal ; the 
portrait of Sir John Wynn of Gwedyr, a large whole sheet print; 
Edward Terry, rector of Greenford, said to be the best by 
Vaughan, with the date 1655; he engraved also several plates of 
monuments and other antiquities. 

There is a print of Robert Devereux, earl of Esses, general of 
the parliament; which Ames mentions as by J. Vaughan. Mr. 
Walpole supposes this may have been an error of the press; if not, 
he adds, that it might have been by a brother of Robert Vaughan, 
It is probably a mistake : unless designed for a G, and then it 
might have been engraved by William Vaughan, who engraved the 
scarce set of prints of Sir William Dick of Braid ; and who fre- 
quently put his baptismal name in Latin. 

MUSICIANS. 

CHRISTOPHORUS SIMPSON. J. Cartoardenf. 
Faithorne sc. Before his " Division Vtolist, or an In- 



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OF ENGLAND. 75 

. traduction to the playing on a Ground;" fol. 1659. 
IHhere is an original portrait of him in the music- 
school at Oxford. 

Christopher Simpson. Carwarden; Grignon. 
\%t Hawkins's "History" 

Christopher Simpson was patronised by Sir Robert Bolles, a gen- 
tleman of Lincolnshire; who having a seat in parliament, some- 

;.tioics resided in London, and Mr. Simpson with him. He was a 

■great composer of instrumental musio, and excelled on the division* 
Tiol. Besides the work above mentioned, he made large annota- 
tions qo "The Art of setting, or composing Music;" Lond. 1655, 

. Ha also published a very good " Compendium of practical Music ; 
ijpntaining, 1. The Rudiments of Song; 2. The Principles of Com-! 
.position ; 3. The Use of Discords; 4. The Form of figurate Descant; 

i, &■ The Contrivance of Canon ;" 8vo. several times printed* Before 
this is a smaller head than that above described) engraved by the 
same hand. The author, who was a Roman Catholic, died in the 
house of his patroo^spon after the restoration. t See the reign of 
Charie* II. 1, 

JOHANNES GAMBLE, pbibmusicus. T, Cross 
sc. h. sh. - , > 

Johannes Gamble. W. Richardson. 

John Gamble was regularly bred to music under Ambrose Bey 
' land, a noted master of that art, with whom he served an appren- 
j.^ic^ihip. Upon his leaving his master, he became one of the mu- 
I sicians to the playhouse, and afterward cornet to the king's chapel. 
E-Jtfter the restoration, he was appointed one of the violins to 
h Gdarles II. and composer of music to the king's theatre. . He pub* 
• fished " Ayres and Dialogues, to be sung to (he Theorbo- Lnte, or 
. Rasa-Viol," 1657 j fol. before which is his portrait. Some amorous* 
'"■ pieces, written, by Thomas Stanley, esq. are in this book ; before 
which are commendatory verses by A. Brome, Richard Love- 
lace, &c. 

* Thia book Lai been commended by Dr. Hayes, now professor of muajc at 
Oiford. 

t The above arlicle is chiefly taken from a manuscript account of musicians, in 
lac Aslimulean MuieuB, by Mr. Wood. 



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76 BIOGRAPHICAL BISTORT 

WRITING-MASTERS, &c. 

EDWARD COCKER, M. 26. Gaywoodf. 

Edward Cocker. JEt. 26, J657 ; oval, adorned 
with foliage; Ato, (Gaywood.) 

Edward Cocker, JEt. 28, 1660; copied from the 
next above. Seethe reign of Charles II. 

Edward Cocker, who was deservedly reckoned among (he im- 
prover! of the arts of writing and arithmetic, published no less than 
fourteen copy-books, engraved by his own hand. Some of his 
calligraphical pieces, which were done on silver plates, have a 
neatness and delicacy superior to the rest. There was never any 
writing-master before or after him who printed so much : indeed 
his being bo general a publisher has been justly objected to him as 
a fault. Mr. Evelyn mentions Cocker, Gery, Gething, and Bil- 
lingsley, as comparable with the Italian masters, both for letters 
and flourishes.* Cocker's " Vulgar and Decimal Arithmetics" 
have been often printed. He was also author of a small English 
dictionary, and editor of a book of sentences for writing, called 
" Cocker's Morals." Ob. arc. 1677. 

THOMAS SHELTON, master of short-hand; JEt: 
49, 1650; 12»w. 

Thomas Shelton; in a small oval of foliage. This 
is the title to his " Tachy-graphy." There is a small 
bust of kirn in the Latin edition of this book, which was 
published in 1671. 

Thomas Shelton ; a small oval. Cross sc. Before 
his Psalms in shorthand, probably published at this 
period. Qu&re. See an account of him in the reign 
of Charles I. 

* " Sculpluri," edit. U59, p. 92. 



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OF ENGLAND. 77 

JEREMIAH RICH. Cross sc. l2mo. , 

Jeremiah Rich ; 8vo, 

Jeremiah Rich., Cross; different from the other. 

Jeremiah Rich, ./Ef.24; prefixed to his "Peri's 
Dexterity" 

" Currant verba licet, lingua est velocior 11 lis : 
Nondum lingua, suum dextra peregit opus." 

" The Pen's Dexterity : by these incomparable Contractions, by 
which a sentence is as soon writ as a Word : allowed by Authority, 
and passed the two Universities, with great Approbation and Ap- 
plause. Invented and taught by Jeremiah Rich, 1659." This, 
which is his best work, is supposed to be that which is recom- 
mended by tf r. Locke. 

John Lilburne offered to give the author a certificate under his 
own hand, that he took down his trial at the Old Bailey with the 
greatest exactness. The book of Psalms in Rich's Character is in, 
print. His short-hand was taught in Dr. Doddridge's academy at 
Northampton. 

NOAH BRIDGES: " Res valet, Arsprastat; si 
Res peril, Ars mihi rcstat;' \1mo. Engraved in the 
manner of Loggan. 

This gentleman,. who was educated at Baliol College, in Oxford, 
was clerk to the parliament that assembled there in 1643. He was 
author of " The Act of short and secret Writing," 1659, 12mo. 
which it is probable Mr. Wood had not seen, as he makes no men- 
tion of it in his article. His head is prefixed to this book. See 
the reign of Charles II. 

JOHN BROWNE, mathematical instrument- 
maker; a whole length. Gay wood sc. 

John Browne"; an etching. P.R. l2mo. 

' Browne, in 1656, published a " Description and Use of the Car- 
penter's Rule," etc. to which is prefixed his print. 



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78 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

A SCHOOLMASTER. 

PETER VOWEL ; from a drawing in the Kings 
"Clarendon;'" 4to. R. Cooper sc. 

Peter Vowel was master of the free-school at Islington, and be- 
ing known to entertain great hopes of the restoration of Charles II. 
was charged by a blind clergyman, whom he had relieved and fen* 
at his table, with uttering treasonable words. For such expressions! 
which he disavowed, he was brought to trial (Lisle sitting is 
president), found guilty, and executed at Charing-cross. Colonel 
Gerard and Mr. Vowel were the two first that suffered for treason 
against the government of Cromwell. 



CLASS XI. 

LADIES, AND OTHERS OF THE 
FEMALE SEX. 

RACHAEL MIDDLESEXI.E comitissa. Vandyk 
p. Lombart sc. Flowers on a table before her; h. sh. 

Rachel, daughter of Francis Fane, the first earl of Westmoreland. 
She was first married to Henry Bourcbier, earl of Bath ; secondly,, lo 
Lionel Cranfield, the third earl of Middlesex, who succeeded his 
brother James in 1651. Lionel died without issue by her, Oct, 26, 
1674. I have seen her picture at Basildon, in Berkshire, among 
the ancestors of the late Lord Viscount Fane. She is said to hate 
left a very large sum to build a private chapel ; but the money was 
never applied to the use for which it was intended. Lord Fane 
used to speak of her as a ■very good woman. Her portrait was painted 
by Vandyck, in the reign of Charles'!. The print should have 
been inscribed, " Lady Rachel Fane, or Rachel Countess of Bath." 
Anachronisms of this kind are too common upon portraits. 

PENELOPE, countess of WILTON; a jewel at 
her breast. Hollar f. \2nw. 



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^ OF ENGLAND. 79 

Penelope, donrina Herbert. Vandyckp W.Sher- 
vin sculpsit; rare. 

Penelope, domina Herbert. Vandyckp. Lam- 
port sc. 

Penelope, daughter and heir of Sir Robert Naunton, secretary of 
late to James I. and author of the " Fragmenta Regalia." She 
vas first married to Paul, viscount Banning, and afterward to Philip, 
ord Herbert ; who, upon the death of Earl Philip his father, in 
1652, became earl of Pembroke. This is unquestionably the lady 
iere meant.. There was not a countess of Wiltshire for some 
:enturies, till Edward VI. created an ancestor of the Duke of Bol- 
ton, earl of Wiltshire. 

The LADY FALCONBERG. G. King, sc. a 
medal. In Peck's " Life of Cromwell." We are told 
by Dr. Swift, in vol. iv. p. 94, of his "Letters," that 
she was extremely like the pictures he had seen of 
her father. 

Mary, countess of Falconberg, third daughter of 
■Oliver Cromwell ; drawn and engraved by W. Bond, 
from a three quarter portrait in the possession of Oliver 
Cromwell, esq. 8vo. 

Mary, third daughter of Olirer Cromwell, a 'lady of great beauty, 
hot of greater spirit, was second wife of Thomas, lord viscount Fal- 
conberg.* Bishop Burnet, who styles her a wise and wort hy woman, 
aaya, that " she was more likely to have maintained the post (of 

* Doctor Hewitt is alio said to have married Uie Protector's younger daughter, 
and probably both of them with the entire approbation of their father, who might 
be fearful, if any revolution should take place, and his family suffer a reverse of 
fortunej the husbands of bis daughters might wish as much for a separation, as they 
then courted the honour of their alliance. Perhaps Oliver was of the same opinion as 
Marshall, an independent minister, who gave for the reason of his marrying his 
daughter with the ring and Common Prayer Book, tfiat the " statute for establishing 
lbs Liturgy was not yet repealed, and he was loath to have his daughter whored and 
turned back upon him for want of a legal marriage." 



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80 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

protector) than either of her brothers ; according to a laying that 
went of her, ' That those who wore breeches deserved petticoats 
better; but if those in petticoats had been in breeches, they would 
hare held faster.* "* After Richard was deposed, who, as she well 
knew, was never formed for regal power, she exerted herself in 
behalf of Charles II. and is said to have had a great and successful 
hand in his restoration. It is very certain that her husband was 
sent to the Tower by the committee of safety, a little before thai 
great event, and that he stood very high in the king's favoar.f 
06. March 14, 1712. 

ELIZABETH CROMWELL, mother of Oliver 
lord- protector, $vo. in Noble's "Memoirs of the Crom- 
well Family." 

Elizabeth Cromwell, mother of the lord-pro- 
tector ; taezz. 

Elizabeth, the wife of Oliver Cromwell: dram 
and engraved by W. Bond, from a half length portrait, 
in the possession of Oliver Cromwell, esq. Svo. 

This lady, was daughter of Sir Richard Steward, Stewart 
or Stuart, of Ely, knt. descended, though very remotely. Iron 
the royal bouse of Scotland. — Both Mr. Cromwell, and his sife 



* Burnet's " Hist, of his own Time," p. 83. 

t Iln very credibly informed, thai Lady Falconberg frequented the eilibiisW 
dbUfch. When she was in town, she went to St. Anne's, Suhu ; when is * 
country, to Chiswkk. She wis a very genteel woman, but pale and sickly. '* 
was known to be very charitable. From the information of * person who Ik* ^ 
in the decline of life. See a remarkable passage concerning her in Dr. t. Gup 
" Review of Nealc's History of the Puritans," p. 36. 

Since this note wai printed, I had the honour to be informed by the £»l ■ 
Ilchester, who remembers Iter well, and to whom she was godmother, thst she ** 
tiate been far gone in the decline of life wlie~n she was pale and sickly, bj J* ■" 
not naturally of such a complexion. The following anecdote of her it at p- » ■ 
the " Vindlciie Anti-Baxleriana:." " It is a well-known story of a great ■■" 
would, before King Charles., put a jest upon Oliver's daughter, the Lady f' k * 
berg:— Morfom, I sate your father yesterday. — What then, sir? — HtafmfcsM"'*' 
mbly.—I tupptae he torn dead then ; uot he noil— Yet— I thought »; or'hr."'' 
line , he would have made you itkA worm. At which the king laughed hr.srtilj> 



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OF ENGLAND. 81 

were persona of great worth, and no way inclined to disaffection, 
either in the civil or religious principles, but remarkable for living 
upon a small fortune with decency, and maintaining a large family 
by their frugal circumspection. 

To ease the expenses incident to a numerous progeny, Mr. 
Cromwell carried on a large brewing business, but it was by ser- 
vants, whose accounts were entirely inspected by Mrs. Cromwell 
herself. She was a careful prudent mother, and brought up her 
family, after her husband's decease, in a very handsome, but frugal 
manner, chiefly from the profits arising from the brewhouse, which 
she continued to carry on upon her own account, and by that means 
gave .each of her daughters a fortune sufficient to marry them to 
persons of genteel families. 

. Her greatest fondness was lavished away upon her only son, 
whom she ever partially loved ; and to her he was every way de- 
serving of it, behaving always in the most filial and tender manner 
to her, and upon his exalting himself to sovereign greatness, he 
gave her apartments in the palace at Whitehall, where she con- 
tinued till her death, which happened Nov. 18, 1654. 
■ As it was wit!) great reluctance she partook of the pageantry of 
sovereignty, so she continued undated with its splendour; and the 
regard she had for Oliver, rendered her constantly wretched, from 
the apprehension she had of his dagger ; she was discontented if 
she did not see him twice a day ; and never heard the report of a 
gun, but she exclaimed, " My son is shot." 

Though so averse to Oliver's protectorate, she seldom troubled 
him with advice; when she did, he always heard her with great 
attention; but acted as he judged proper: and with respect to her 
funeral, entirely opposite to it ; she requesting, when dying, to have 
a private, one, and that her body might not be deposited in West- 
minster Abbey. Instead of fulfilling this request, the Protector 
conveyed her remains with great solemnity, and attended with 
many hundred torches, though it was day-light, and interred them 
in the dormitory of pur English monarchs, in a manner suitable 
to those of the mother of a personage of his then rank. At the 
restoration, her body was thrown (with others) into a hole, before 
the lodgings belonging to one of the canons or prebendaries, in 
St. Margaret's churchyard. 



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82 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

MRS. ELIZABETH CLEYPOLE ; from m ori- 
ginal miniature by Hoskins; in the collection of Thomas 
Coutts, esq. R. Cooper sc, Ato. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Cleypole; in Simon's " Medals." 
G. Vertue sc. Ato, 

Mas. Elizabeth Cleypole. W.Richardson; 8w. 

Elizabeth, the second and favourite daughter of Oliver CrouweH, 
was christened July 2, 1629, at St. John's church, in Huntingdon! 
and married John Cleypole, esq. eldest son of John Cleypole, esq. 
of Gray's Inn, whose congenial sentiments with Cromwell on poli- 
tical affairs paved Hie way to the match. Mrs. Cleypole had an 
elevation of mind and dignity of deportment, blended with the affa- 
bility and mildness of the most humble, and was universally re- 
spected by all parties. She appears to have laboured under great 
bodily complaints, which, joined to the loss of a favourite child, 
hastened her dissolution. What is also generally allowed to hare 
accelerated It, was the death of Dr. Hewit, who was beheaded, for 
endeavouring to bring in Charles the Second. The ineffectual 
attempts she made on her father to save the life of this person is 
accounted for, by the knowledge she had of his clerical capacity, 
frequently having attended his congregation when he preached; 
and the remembrance of his fate caused her to have repeated 
conferences with Oliver just before her death. In some of these, 
she painted the guilt of his ambition in the most glowing colours, 
which, says Lord Clarendon, exceedingly perplexed him ; and ob- 
serves, that he took much pains to prevent any of his attendants 
hearing; yet many expressions escaped her, which were heard by 
those near, respecting cruelty and blood : and she was particular 
hi mentioning Dr. Hewit ; the near approach of her dissolution 
giving her liberty to say what she formerly thought, yet durst not 
at the time express. It is however certain, that either what she 
said, or her death, affected him wonderfully, as he never after ap- 
peared cheerful, but settled into a confirmed melancholy to his 
death. 

This amiable woman died at Hampton-court, amidst the prayer* 
of all for her recovery, and her loss was lamented by the whole 
court, but particularly by her husband and father. No respect 
whatever was omitted that could be paid to her memory. The 



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OF ENGLAND. 83 

Protector ordered the body to be removed from the palace in 
which she died to the painted chamber in Westminster, where it 
lay in state some time; and from thence conveyed, in the night of 
August 10th, in great pomp, to the dormitory of the English kings, 
where it was deposited in a vault made purposely to receive it. 
The inscription oa the coffin was, 

Depotittm 

Illustrissinitr Dominx D. Elizabeths, 

mtper uxorit Honor atissimi Domini, 

Domini Johannis Ctaypele 

Magiitri Equitis ; 

necnon Fitta Sccunilm 

Sermissimi Sf Celtiisimt 

Principis 

O&oeri, Scotia if Hibermx 

«.. 

Protectant ; 
Obiit ■ 
apud 2E.de* Hamptoniemet, 
Sexto die Augutti, 
anno tttatu tux Vicesimo Octavo, 
Annoqve Domini 
1658. 
In the year 1725, when alterations were making in Henry the 
Seventh's chapel, previous to an installation of the knights of the 
Bath, they discovered, near the steps of the founder's tomb, the 
vault of this lady. Mr. Fidoe, clerk of the works, observing the 
workmen extremely busy, and in confusion, went to them, when he 
found they had forced the silver plate (with the above inscription) 
from the coffin, and endeavouring to conceal it; Mr. Fidoe took it 
from them, and delivered it to Dr. Pearce, the dean, who said, ho 
woold not take any thing that had been deposited with the illus- 
trious dead, and ordered it to be carefully replaced. 

It is asserted that she was a warm partisan for King Charles I. 
as veil aa for Charles II. But it is a well known fact, that she 
constantly used all her influence in behalf of any who fell into 
misfortunes on account of their loyalty; indeed, all that were in 
distress partook of her pity, and very many of her bounty, which, 
with her munificence, rendered the very large allowance the Pro- 
tector settled upon her inadequate. 



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84 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

LADY FRANCES RUSSELL, fourth and 

youngest daughter of Oliver Cromwell ; drawn and 
engraved by W. Bond, from a three-quarter portrait, in 
the possession of Oliver Cromwell, esq. Svo. 

This lady is reported to have been much disappointed by ber 
father, in his rejecting several honourable proffers made to him, to 
solicit her in marriage, particularly from King Charles the Second, 
during his exile,* and the Duke of Enghien, only son of the Prince 
of Conde; and at length permitted the addresses of an amiable 
young gentleman, the Honourable Robert Rich, esq. grandson and 
heir to Robert, earl of Warwick, and that without the knowledge 
of her father. 

This alliance met with innumerable difficulties ; one great reason 
why Oliver objected to it was, his having engaged her in marriage I 

• Lord Broghill (afterward earl of Orrery), who might bo properly called the 
common friend of King Charles mil the Protector, endeavoured (o effect a recon- I 
dilation between them, by the former's marrying this lady, to which not only lb* 
king, but also the herself, and ber mother, gave tbeir assent ; hut as it was a deli- 
Bate point to obtain Oliver's concurrence, it was not thought advisable to be too 
precipitate, but lo let the report circulate abroad before it w> mentioned to the 
Protector : when it was judged proper to be broke out to him, Broghilt went is I 
usual to the palace, and being introduced lo his highness in his closet, he asked, 
"Whence he came, and what new* lie had brought?" His lordship replied, 
I* From the city, where I have heiird strange news indeed !" " Ah! what is it:* 
'■ Very strange news indeed I" ■' What is it=" " Perhaps yonr highness wilt be 
offended-" " I will not," replied Oliver hastily, " be it what it will." Broghill ika, 
in a laughing way, said, " All the city news is, that you are going to restore the 
king, and marry him to Lady Frances." Oliver smiling, said, " And "hat do Iks 
fools think of il!" " They like it, and think it is the Wisest thing you can do, if 
you can accomplish il." Cromwell looking steadfast at Broghill, " Do you belirrt 
so too ;" wljo, finding the proposal pleasing to him, went on, " I do really believe ii 
is the best thing you can do, to secure yourself." The Protector, walking about nil* 
his bands behind him, in a muting posture, turned about to bis lordship, "Why da 
jou believe it !" Upon which he endeavoured to convince Oliver of the expe- 
diency and necessity of the ihipg ; that nothing was more easy to bring about tb« 
restoration, and that be would have the king for his Bon-in-law, and, in all proba- 
bility, become grandfather to the heir of the crown. To Ibis the Protector listened 
with attention, and traversing the apartment twice or thrice, said, '■ The king win 
never forgive roe the death of his father." " Sir," replied his lordship, "you were 
one of many who were concerned in.it, but you will be alone in- tha merit of restoriaj 
him i employ somebody to sound him upon it, and see how he will take it; III do 
it, if you think fit." " No, he will never forgive me his father's death;" besides, 
lie is 'so damnably debauched, he cannot bo trusted." His lordship was fearful of 
proceeding Farther, and so the discourse took another turn. 



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OF ENGLAND. , 85 

to William Dutton, esq. who was bequeathed to Lady Frances by 
his uncle, John Dutton, of Sherborne, in Gloucestershire, esq. one 
of the richest men in the kingdom; who, by his will, dated Jan. 14, 
1655, and proved June 30, 1657, left this bequest: " I humbly 
request and desire, that bid highness, the lord -protector, will be 
pleased to take upon him the guardianship and disposing of my 
nephew William Dutton, and jf that estate I, by deed of settle- 
ment, hath left him ; and that his highness will be pleased, in 
order to my former desires, and according the discourse that hath 
passed betwixt us thereupon, that when he shall come to ripeness 
of age, a marriage may be had and solemnized betwixt my said 
nephew, William Dutton, and the Lady Frances Cromwell, his 
highness's youngest daughter, which I much desire, and (if it take 
effect) shall account it as a blessing from God." 

Lady Frances and Mr. Rich,. notwithstanding this and other im- 
pediments, overcame all obstacles, but not without great trouble, 
and were married Nov. 11, 1657, their nuptials being solemnized 
with great pomp and splendour.— The lady's happiness, which 
seemed so much to depend upon the gaining this husband, was but 
short lived, for he was cut off soon after, dying Feb. 16, having 
been married only two months ; unfortunately she had no issue by 
Mr. Rich, Had he lived some time longer she would have been a 
countess ; and had she had a son by him, the child would have 
inherited the title of Earl of Warwick. 

She did not long remain a widow; her relation, Sir John Russell, 
but solicited and obtained her hand : by him she had a numerous 
family. The late baronet, Sir John Russell, was descended from 
this marriage. She had also the misfortune to bury this gen- 
tleman, not many years after their marriage ; after which she had a 
posthumous son. She remained his widow till her death, which 
was the long space of fifty-one years. Unhappily for her> she saw 
the fine estate of the Russells ruined in supporting the laws and 
liberties of the kingdom, and by an attachment. to the person of a 
monarch, who made but poor returns for so generous an assistance. 
The ample jointures she enjoyed were sufficient to have enriched 
her family, had they been managed with discretion, which it is 
probable tbey were not ; frugality was seldom, or ever, adopted 
by any of her family, and, it may be presumed, was unknown to her. 

She died Jan. 27, 1720-1, at the very advanced age of eighty- 
four, after surviving all her brothers and sisters. After Oliver 
"as declared protector, his daughters resided chiefly in apartments 



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86 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

of one of the palaces; and suck attention vac paid to then k 
foreign princes and states, that their ambassadors constantly paid 
their compliments to these ladies, both when they came into, « 
left the kingdom. 

DOROTHY, wife of Richard Cromwell, lord-pro- 
tector; an etching; Ato. Thane exc. 

Dorothy, wife of Richard Cromwell, was eldest daughter and 
coheiress of Richard Major, of Southampton, in the county of 
Hants, esq. Very little is known of her, considering that she ww. 
at one time, the second person in the kingdom. There is every 
reason to suppose that she was scarce (if ever) at court ihrire 
Oliver's protectorate, and never during that of her husband, 
Among all the illiberal things that were levelled againat the pro- 
tectorate house of Cromwell, her character is almost the only one 
that scandal has left untouched. She was married at Harslet, 
May 1, 1649, and died Jan. 5,1675, in the forty-ninth year of b« 
age, and was buried in the chancel of Hursley church, leaving be- 
hind her the character of a prudent, godly, practical Christian 
By her husband (whom it is thought she never saw after he retired 
to the continent in 1660) she had nine children, sis of whom dM 
in their infancy. 

Oliver Cromwell, her second son and heir, born at Harsfef. 
July 11, 1656, upon his mothers death, succeeded, by the set- 
tlement made upon her marriage, to the manor of Merdon, at 
which time he was not of age by about three years. He waaverj 
active at the revolution, and would have raited a regiment ofboW 
for the service of Ireland, if he might have been permitted to nss ! 
his captains; but the cautious William, from his name, his pos>i 
and theaad vantages he bad asked for, declined accepting the oSa, 
as judging it imprudent to make the son of one, and grandson of 
another, who had sat upon his thrones, too popular at sack ' 
juncture. 

In the reign of that king, he found it necessary, on some ac- 
count or other, to present a petition to parliament; and gave W 
petition to a friend, a member, who took it to the House of Co* 
mons to present it. Just as this gentleman was entering- the 
house with the petition in his hand. Sir Edward Seymour, tk 
famous old Tory member, was also going in: on sight of St 
Edward so near him, the gentleman found bis fancy briskly "^ 



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OF ENGLAND. 87 

.led by certain ideas of fun, to make the surly, sow, old Seymour, 
Try op a petition for Oliver Cromwell. " Sir Edward," says he, 
opping him on the instant, " will you do me a favour! I this 
oment recollect, that I must immediately attend a trial in Weat- 
tnster Hall, which may keep me too late to give in this petition, 
i I promised to do this morning ; 'tis mere matter of form ; will 
au be so good as to carry it up for me ?" " Give it me," said Sir 
dward : the petition went directly into his pocket, and he into 
le house. When a proper opportunity happened to produce it, 
eymotir put himself upon his feet, and his spectacles, and began 
» read, " The humble petition of — of— of— of the devil I" said 
eymour, " of Oliver Cromwell f'The roar of laughter in the bouse, 
t seeing him so fairly taken in, was too great for Sir Edward to 
tand it; so he flung down his petition, and ran out directly. 

Oliver died May 11, 1705, and was buried with his family at 
lursley, the 13th pf the same month ; and though he lived to be 
isty-onc years of age, he never was married. He is said to have 
Hissessed a great deal of the spirit of his grandfather, with some- 
thing of his look and genius. 



LADY PENELOPE GAGE ; from an original 
at Hengrave. R. Cooper sc. 4(o. In Gage's " His- 
tory and Antiquities of Hengrave, in Suffolk." 

Lady Penelope Darcy, third daughter of Thomas, earl of Rivers, 
by Mary his countess, had from her mother, in 1643, a settlement 
made on her and her heirs, of Hengrave and other property in Suf- 
folk. It is said that Sir George Trenchard, Sir John Gage, and Sir 
William Hervey, each solicited her in marriage at the same time ; 
and that to keep peace between the rivals, she threatened the first 
aggressor with her perpetual displeasure; humorously telling 
them, that if they would wait, she would have them all in their 
turns — a promise which the lady actually performed. The person 
first favoured by her was Sir George Trenchard, of Wolverton, in 
Dorsetshire. This marriage was soon followed by the death of her 
husband, without issue; and in the following year, Penelope mar- 
ried Sir John Gage, of.Firle, in Sussex, whose descendants are 
now owners of Hengrave. 

Lady Penelope remained a widow till the year 1642, when she 
■tarried Bu William Hervey, of Ickwortb, in Suffolk, who sat in 



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88 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

parliament for St. Edmund's Bury, in the third of King Charles thtf 
First, and was sheriff of Suffolk in 1650. By a former wife, Susan, 
daughter of Sir Robert Jennyn, of Rushbrook, he had: several 
children, of whom Sir Thomas Hervey, a younger sod, was father 
of John Hervey, first earl of Bristol. Mary, one of the daughters, 
in 1648, became the wife of Lady Penelope's third son. Sir Edward 
Gage. Upon this marriage, his mother gave them the manor of 
Chevington, and other lands in Suffolk, and settled upon him, in 
, remainder, expectant on her decease, the manor of Hengrave, and 
her other Suffolk property. Sir William Hervey died on the 
of September, 1660, and was buried at lekworth. By hi 
marriage there was not any issue. Lady Penelope survived him 
few months only. 

DOMINA PASTON, 1G59. Faithorne sc. k. sh. 
This print is companion to that of Sir Wm. Paston. 

LadyPaston; oval, with arms.- W.Richardson. 

This lady appears from the arras, which are a chevron betwixt 
three owls, to be the second wife of Sir William Paston. His first 
was Catharine, eldest daughter of Robert Bertie, earl of Lindsey, 
who received his death's' wound, valiantly fighting for Charles I. 
at Edge-hill ; and grand -daughter of the gallant Peregrine, lord 
Willoughby, of Eresby. It is observable that this lady. and her 
husband were descended from two of the bravest men that we read , 
of in our English annals. See " Biographia Britannic a," article J 
Bertie, See also Paston, Class VIII. 1 

The LADY ELEANOR TEMPLE. Garwood/.} 
1658; l2mo. Four English verses. The plate is i.; the 
possession of the Duke of Buckingham. 

The Lady Eleanor Temple, &c. W.Richardson. 

This is most probably the wife of Peter Temple, esq. of Leices- 
tershire, styled, on the print, Sir Peter Temple. His wife being 
calledLadyEleanor.doesnotproveher tohavebeen of a noble family- 
At this time, they had not established the distinction betwixt Eleanor | 
Lady **• and Lady Eleanor ***, which last title is now applied 



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7*tMMhW?/ii t A< t «(im/ii/vi,ifeeY*Mff*u,tX t $fM& 



.poodle 



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ZsVertues P&tternej .Mother Mayil'4-Wife 

WWName* /ter- Glorious Character biojt. 
This Lively TmPLZof'thcKaly Ghasl 

PuhFtbUffi hy WhcharUfin J/'St JiVorcrf. 



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OF ENGLAND. 89 

to the daughters of peers. But it is at least doubtful Whether het 
husband was a knight; and if he was, dame, not lady, is the proper 
prefix to the Christian name of a baronet's or knight's wife. 



LADY KATHARINE HARRINGTON, wife to 
Sir James Harrington, Mt. 36, 1654 ; octagon. 
Faithorne sc. 4to. 

There seems to be no doubt that this is the portrait of Katharine, 
daughter of Sir Marmaduke Dorrel, of Buckinghamshire,* and wife 
of Mr. Harrington, commonly called Sir James Harrington, the 
well-known author of " The Commonwealth of Oceana," and the 
translator of the first six books of the " JEneis :" but it is certain 
that she was tot married to him till after the restoration. f He. 
was then almost totally changed in body and mind; his constitu- 
tion was broken, and his intellects visibly impaired, by a tedious 
imprisonment, by harsh treatment, and as- some believe, from the 
effects of poison. This lady was, in her younger years, not only 
admired for her personal accomplishments, but greatly celebrated 
for her wit. Mr. Harrington made his addresses to her when she 
was in the pride of youth and beauty, and surrounded with ad- 
mirers. He was then undistinguished from the crowd; but she 
afterward, from motives of interest, became his wife. As he did 
not meet with the returns of affection from her that he expected, an 
open rupture ensued soon after their marriage : but they were soon 
reconciled, and he treated her with great civility to the end of his 
life. 

MRS. JANE LANE; in Lord Clarendon's " His- 
tory ;" $vo. 

Mas. Lane; on horseback, with Charles- II.' in 
Clarendon's " History." 

Mrs. Jane Lane; oval, in a square; in Charles's 
"Preservation after the Battle of Worcester" J. Scott: 

•Stmni ofu^eI)BnrffftnSIy1felmriedini!iecfinrcn'iyfW«t , Wyc#Mb;Bu?ki; 
t See " Biographic," IV. p. J53B. 
VOL. IV. - X 



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90 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

Mrs. Jane Lane. R. Cooper sc. 

Mrs. Lane. Stow sc. From an original picture in 
the collection of Sir Hugh Smith. 

The following is said to have been done for Mrs. 
Zone; an anonymous portrait after Moj/sner, by W. 
Hollar, 1645. 

Mrs. Jane Lane. R. Cooper sc. 

Mrs. Lane was a woman of uncommon sense and spirit, and 
famous for assisting Charles II. in his escape, after, the fatal batik 
of Worcester. The royal fugitive, disguised in her father's livery, 
rode before her on horseback, from Bentley Hall, in Staffordshire,* 
to Mr. Norton's, near Bristol. This adventure wits conducted with 
such singular address, that the king passed unnoticed through that 
long journey. Her services were amply rewarded at the restoration. 
She was afterward married to Sir Clement Fisher, baronet, of 
Packington Hall, in Warwickshire, t 

MRS. SUSANNAH PERW1CH ; in an oval; 8t». 
P. Rogerson del. T. Cross sc. Eight English verses. 

Susannah Perwich, &e. W. Richardson. 

Susannah, daughter of Robert Perwich, whose wife was mistress 
of a very noted boarding-school, at Hackney, was the admiration 
of all that knew her, for her accomplishments of body and mind. 

* Bentley Hull was the soot of Mr. Lane, and about twelve miles' f ram Boscobel 
Wood, where the king was concealed in an oak. Col. John Line, brother to Mn 
Jam, was aiding in'his escape. 

t " Lite of Major Bemardi," by himaelf, p. 5, and 6. That author inform) u. 
that after lite king arrived at the late Sir George Norton's house, near Briilot, te 
went Into the kitchen, by the advice of bis supposed mistress, the better to conees! 
himself; alni that, aibs waa " staddiug by (he fire-aide, near the jack, the cool- 
maid desired bim to wind it up ; and he fumbling until the spit stood still, the BaM 
struck him, and Ceiling him a black blockhead, asked where the devil he had lived, 
that he had not learnt to wind up it jack? The king modeaily answered her will 
a blush, that he waa a poor tradesman's ion, snd had not been long in hit tattf 1 ' 
service," — Bcrnardi's "Lire," p. 6 and 7. 



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i^ftoJ/L d/natcAt the rzitiAte. ■netdr rvi/tild sfoA tnr. Orcaih- 
Ci^ui -Im nor ti/e/ef fuciurt /LCaJ-niy firtnu 
ffibie rm. a found azm jAj.w£ from. Aisfcvrcc ctoric. 

- GooqI 



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OF ENGLAND. 91 

Sbc had not only that quickness of apprehension, and readiness of 
elocution whith is natural to ber own sex, but a solidity of judgment 
rarely seen in men. Such was the pregnancy of her parti, that of 
eight hundred ladies educated in her mother's school, there was not 
one that ever attained to half her excellence in music, dancing, and 
those other useful and ornamental qualifications in which ladies 
are usually educated. Music was so peculiarly adapted to her 
genius, that she excelled on several instruments; and was, at 
about fourteen, well qualified to play any thing on the treble viol 
in concert, at first sight. Lawes, Simpson, Jenkins, and other 
celebrated masters of music, listened to her with admiration, when 
she sung or played their compositions, or her own. Her name was 
so well known abroad, that she was frequently visited by foreigners 
of eminence. But of all her excellences, as the author of her 
" Life" assures us, her piety was the greatest ; and her highest 
qualification was to die the death, as she had lived the life, of a 
Christian. Ob. 3 July, 1661, JEt, 25. See her " Life," by John 
Batchiler, both in prose and verse, with various anagrams and 
acrostics on her name, 12mo. 1661 ; before which is her portrait 



DORCAS BRABAZON. Georgii Lane, eq. au. 
(Meet, conjux. 1662. In Simon's " Medals," plate 22. 

Lady Lane, daughter of Sir Anthony Brabazon, of Tallaghstown, 
in the county of Louth, knt. married 1644, to Sir George Lane, 
principal secretary of state, and privy -counsellor to King Charles II. 
in Ireland. 06.1671. 



MADAMA KILLEGRE, (perhaps) Killegrew. 
Hollar/, 1652; half length. 



Madam Killegrew. Gay wood sc. 



An anonymous portrait of a woman: her hair is 
dressed in many formal curls, which nearly resemble 
iottle-screws. This is the only similar idea that occurs 
to me at present ; and I shall look no farther, as it is 



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B? BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

sufficient to express my meaning. The following Una 
are under the head: 

" Lo here a beauty in her mora, who shakes 
Dag from her hair ; and whose perfection ntakei 
The sun amaz'ti, a heaven on earth to view .'" 
So much can birth aad education do." 

I have the first leaf only of the dedication belonging to the 
book to which this very ugly print of a great beauty was prefixed. 
This is the address : 

" To the true mirror of her sex, the truly honourable Mrs. Elliaor 
Pargiter; and to the most accomplished, with all real perfections, 
Mrs._Eliz. Washington, her only daughter, and heiress to the truly 
honourable Laurence Washington, Esquire, lately deceased." Itis 
probable, that this beauty, who dazzled the sun out of countenance, 
" Vultus nimium fnlgidus aspici," soon changed her name ; and 
especially as she was heiress to a man of fortune. + It is to be re- 
gretted that a lady of so many accomplishments should be so little 
known, and that the engraver has given us so vile an idea of the 
splendour of her beauty. 

JANE, LADY OESAR, daughter of Sir Edward 
Barkham, knt. lord mayor of London in 1622, and 
wife of Sir Charles Caesar, knt. master of the Rolls, 
married 1626, died June 16, 1661, aged 60; buried 
at Bennington, in Herts. R. Wilkinson exc.Ato. 

This lady, the daughter of Sir Edward Barkham, knight, and 
alderman of London, who had served the office of mayor in 1622, 
was the second wife of Sir Charles Csesar, master of the Rolls, bj 
whom she had issue, Julius, the short-lived heir, rather to his 
father's contagious disease than. to. his estates, who died of the 
, small-pox, five days after Sir Charles, on the 11th of December, 
1642; Henry, who succeeded bis father in the paternal estate; 

* \ wis (bant to censure litis paulfe. till. I recollected an obaerralioa of Mr. 
BickersUfF, " That a metaphor cannot be earned too far, when it is applied 101 
lad/i cbarmi." See ihe " Tatler," No. 34. 

t We lean from Collin, '« " Peerage," that Hie Grit Em] Fetrcn married Hia- 
betb, daughter and heir of Laurence Washington, emj. of Cuctdeo, in Wilttlurt. 



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OF ENGLAND. 93 

Charles, and Edward, who died infants, the former in 1634, the 
latter in 1639; a second Charles, who lived to the age of matu- 
rity; a daughter, Jane, who also fell a victim on the 3d of Novem- 
ber, 1642, at the age of two years, te the small-pox, about a 
month before her father became infected. 

Sir Charles's relict died io the bouse of her son, Charles Caesar, 
at Much Hadam, in Herts, June 16, 1661. She had passed most of 
the years of ber widowhood at Linwood, in Lincolnshire, on an 
estate which probably was. settled on her at her marriage, and 
which, with' other property in that county, seems to have composed 
her marriage portion. She had also made purchases in Lincolnshire.; 
for, by her will, dated April 15th, 1657, and proved Nov. 16lh, 
1661 ; she bequeaths to her " youngest son, Charles, the lands 
which she had bought of William Hastings, of Ashfordby, in the 
parish of Billesby ; and of Thomas Wright, of East Ray sin ; and of 
Jeremiah Walker, of Appley; all in that county ;'* with a charge 
that he should sell them, if required, to ber eldest son, Sir Henry, 
at the price which sbe bad paid for them. To Charles also, who 
seems to have been her favourite son, she gives 1000?. and the 
great jewel, which was left to her by her mother, the Lady Bark- 
ham ; add to Sir Henry, only 100/. for mourning, because of 
former gifts, such as the use of 1000/, for nine years; also 400/. &c." 

Her husband, his first lady, herself, and all her children, with the 
exception of Charles, are buried at Bennington. On the tomb of 
this lady is inscribed, " Here lyeth the body of the most vertuous, 
charitable, and truly religious lady, Dame Jane Caesar, daughter to 
Sir Edward Barkbam, knt. lord mayor of London; late wife of 
Sir Charles Ceesar, knt. master- of the Rolls, by wheat she had 
nine children, two only surviving her, viz. Sic Henry Ctesar, knt. 
lord of this manor, and Charles Ceesar, of Much Hadham, esq. 
She lived wife to Sir Charles Cfesar fifteen years, and remained 
his. widow eighteen. She died in the 60th year of her age, at 
Much Hadham, in this county, much honoured and lamented, 
June 16, and was here interred, June 27, 1661, in hopes of a 
blessed resurrection." 



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BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 



CLASS XII. 

PERSONS REMARKABLE FROM A SINGLE 
CIRCUMSTANCE IN THEIR LIVES, &c. 

RICHARD PEND BRILL, a fanner, who helped 
to preserve Charles II. after the fatal hattle of Wor- 
cester. See the reign of Charles, in which his 
portrait was painted. 

WILLIAM PENDERILL, brother to the former. 
His portrait, which represents him in the eighty- 
fourth year of his age, was probably drawn in the 
reign of William III. I 

JAMES NAYLOR, born at Ardesloe (Ardesley)' 
near Wakefield, in Yorkshire, '* was an Independent, 
and served quarter-master in the parliament army, 
about the year 1641; turned Quaker in 1641, 
(1651-2); was punished for blasphemy, 1656; au- 
thor of many books. He died at Holm, in Hunting- 
donshire, 1600, aged 44." T. Preston f. 

■James Naylor; in a large hat. F. Place; scarce! 

James Naylor ; in a large hat. R. Grave sc. 

James Naylor; a large B. in his forehead; t 
small print. In Pagit's " Heresiography." - 

I take this to be the only genuine likeness of him. 
This enthusiastic visionary, who was converted to Quakerism hi 
George Fox, was xome time an admired preacher among the people 



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OF ENGLAND. 95 

that religion. As his-features bore a near resemblance 16 the 
mmon pictures -of Christ, it struck his imagination that. he was 
ms formed into Christ himself. He presently assumed the charac- 
' of the Messiah, and was acknowledged as such by his deluded 
lowers. He affected to heal the sick, atid raise the dead ; and* 
tered triumphantly into Bristol, attended by many of this sect, 
10 strewed his way with leaves and branches of trees, crying,' 
Hosanna, blessed is he that cometh in the name of the Lord."* 
i was pilloried, burnt through the tongue, and branded with a B 
his forehead, for blasphemy, and was moreover sentenced to be 
lipped, and confined to hard labour. The discipline of a prison 
sn restored him to his senses. f One of his books is entitled. 
Milk for Babes, &c. written in the Time of the Confinement of his 
tward Man in prison." Load. 1661 ; 4to. 

" The Portraiture of MARTHA HATFIELD." 
ie is represented lying in a bed, in one of the trances of 
hick the book that it belongs to gives an account. The 
•int is prefixed to " The wise Virgin, or a wonderful 
Tarration of the various Dispensations of God towards 
Child of eleven Years of Age; wherein, as his Seve- 
ty hath appeared in afflicting, so also his Goodness, 
tft in enabling her (when stricken dumb, deaf, and 
ind, through the Prevalency of the Disease) at several 
imes to utter many glorious Truths concerning Christ, 
■aith, and other Subjects; and also in recovering her, 
ithout the use of any external Means, lest the Gloty 
\ould be given to any other; to the Wonderment of 
any that came far and near to see and hear her, with 
•me Observations in the fourth Tear since her Reco- 
try" By James Fisher, a Servant of Christ, and late 
{'mister of the Gospel, in Sheffield; the 5th edition, 
364. The epistle dedicatory, by the author, is dated 
le 20th Jan. 1652. 



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96 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

Mahtha Hatfield; copied fitm thcabaoe^ft&ttd-* 

field's " Remarkable Persons." 

Tliis title so fully expresses (be contents of the book, that noting 
more need be added, but on] j that she was the daughter of Antiwar 
and Faith Hatfield, of Lelghton, in the West Riding of Yorkshire, 
and was twelve yean old, the 27th of September, 1652 ; that she 
was seised with the disorder which the author calls the spleen wind, 
on the 6U) of April, the same year, and suffered repeated convul- 
sions, and was rapt into several trances, till the 9th of December 
following, when (he was restored to her censes. She continued in 
this state when the book was first published with an imprimatur, 
signed "Joseph Caryl, 18 April, 1653." The licenser says, that 
" the truth of the particulars related in the Narrative will be avouched 
by many persons of worth," and concludes thus : "We hope, reader, 
those that are engaged in this work dare not commit such an im- 
piety as to gull the world with a forgery." This seems to intimate 
that Caryl himself suspected the truth of the relation, which mff 
naturally remind the reader of the story of Elizabeth Barton, the pre- 
tended holy maid of Kent. This pious fraud was so artfully ma- 
naged as to deceive even Sir Thomas More, who cannot be supposed 
accessary to any kind of imposture. 



ROGER CRAB; a wood-cut; whole length; four 
English verses. Before his Life, to which is prefixed 
this title: " The English Hermit, or the Wonder of this 
Age; being a Relation of the Life of Roger Crab, 
living near Uxbridge,* taken from his own Mouth, 
shewing his strange, reserved, and unparalleled Kind of 
Life, who counteth it a Sin against his Body and Soul, to 
eat any Sort of Flesh, Fish, or living Creature, or to 
drink any Wine, Ale, or Beer. He can live with three 
farthings a week. His constant Food is Roots and 
Herbs; as Cabbage, Turnips, Carrots, Dock-Leavet, 
and Grass; also Bread and Bran, without Butter or 
Cheese. His clothing Sackcloth. He left the Jrw$. 



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Hereto you.rview'$ prefentedthe great Eattr, 
Marriot the Lawyer, Cramer -Tnwf Cormorant j 

Who for Lb Cutt is become ameer cbtsUr: 
ThofetHatwin feed him Coupcdl (Kail not want. 



fuiftey ?LNW i? W&MrJfi* N'3/ /ln~.J- 



OF ENGLAND. 97 

•nd kept a Shop at Chesham, and hath now left off -that, 
tnd sold a considerable Estate to give to the Poor; 
/tewing his Reasons from the Scripture : Mar. x, 2 1 . 
fer. xxxv. — Wherefore, if Meat make my Brother to 
yffendy I will eat nojlesh, while the World standeth,&;c. 
1 Cor; viii. 13." 

Roger Crab; in Caulfield's "Remarkable Per- 
sons." 

Roger Crab. W. Richardson. 

Dr. Cheyne, who was an advocate for the Lessian diet, and men- 
tions the longevity of some of the ancient ascetics of the desert, 
who lived on that kind of food , probably never heard of this strange 
humorist ; or if he did, he passed him over in silence, as a mad- 
man, who seems to have destroyed himself, by eating bran, grass, 
dock-leaves, and such other trash as was comprehended within his 
pious plan of living for three farthings a week. If Crab had resided 
in France or Italy, he would indubitably have retired into the mo- 
nastery o£. La Trappe. He died the 11th of September, 1680, in 
the 60tb year of his age, and was buried at St. Dunstan's, Stepney; 
where there was a tomb, with an epitaph to his memory. See Ly- 
sons's " Stepney." 

MARRIOT, the great eater ; h. sh. several Eng- 
lish verses. 

Marriot; at the shambles ; l2mo. 

Marriot; with wooden shoes, S$c. W.Richardson. 

I Marriot, the great eater; in Caulfield's " Re~ 
markable Persons" 

Harriot was a lawyer of Gray's Inn, who piqued himself upon 
the brutal, qualifications of a voracious appetite, and a powerful 
digestive faculty; and deserves to be placed no higher in the scale 
of beings than a 'cormorant or an ostrich. He increased his natural 
capacity for food by art and application; and had as much vanity 



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98 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

in eating to excess, as any tnonk ever had in starving himtSf. 
See two copies of verses upon him among the works of Charles 
Cotton, esq. I 

BARBARA URSELIN, &c. Isaac Brunn debt. 
et sc. 1653. She is represented playing on the harp- 
sichord : underneath is a Dutch inscription. I never saw 
but one proof of this print, which is in the collection of 
the Earl of Bute." Copied by W. Richardson. 

The lively portraiture of Barbara, wife to Jkfickatl 
VANBECK, born at Augsburg, in High Germany; 
the daughter of Balthasar and Anne Urslerrf aged 29, 
A". Dom. 1658. R. Gaywoodf. Land.. The folkmng 
note wds written under one of these prints which is, or 
was lately, in ike possession of Mr. Frederick, bookseller 
in Bath :% 

" This woman I saw in Ratcliffe Highway, in tkt 
year 1668, and was satisfied she was a woman." — John 
Bulfinch. 

The face and hands of this woman are represented hairy ail over. 
Her aspect resembles that of a monkey. She has a very long and 
large spreading beard, the hair of which hangs loose and flowing 
like the hair of the head. She is playing on an organ. Vanbecx 
married this frightful creature, on purpose to carry her about (or » 
show. 

HANNAH TRAPNEL ; in the dress of a Qtotker, 
listening to the inspiration of an evil spirit. Gaywood 
fecit; Mo, very scarce. 

• The Catalogue of Heads, in this second edition (17T5), liu been enlarged 
from the grand collection of prints in (be possession of the Eul of Bate, in wbieb 
is a great number of English portraits, and many of them very rare. I»rd' Mooct- 
stnart was pleased, in the most obliging manner, to point out to me some consi- 
derable additions to the biographical part of this work. 

t tlnterin. 

I I hate heard (bat it was purchased by Mr. Bull about -17?5. 



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BARBARA URSEL1K. 



CooqIc 



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OF ENGLAND. 99 

Hannah Thapnel, a Quaker and pretended pro- 
phetess. J\ Berry sc. 4to. Copied from the above. 

This woman, who was a follower of James Naylor, took up her 
residence for some time in the neighbourhood of Whitehall, where 
she fell into several trances, in which she uttered strong exprea-- 
Bions, as revelation against the person and government of Oliver 
Cromwell. For these she was sent to Bridewell, as an impostor 
and vagabond. She afterward inclined to the fanatical party, and 
went on pilgrimage to visit Carew the regicide, who was confined 
by Cromwell's order in Pendennis Castle, Sewel in his History of 
the Quakers, notices " a certain woman that came into the parlia- 
ment house with a pitcher in her hand, which she breaking before 
them, said, So should they be broken to pieces : which came to 
pass not long after." This could be do other than Hannah Trap- 
net. See Sewel 'a " History of the Quakers," p. 185. 

JAMES HIND ; oval; cut in wood; prefixed to his 
" Confession." 

James Hind; oval; from the above. W.Richardson. 

James Hind; on horseback, in armour; (portrait 
of Charles II.) 

James Hind declares in his confession, May 2, 1649, " I de- 
parted England and went to the Hague ; but after three days 
departed for Ireland, and lauded at Galloway, and was corporal to 
the Marquis of Ormond's life-guards ; was wounded at Youghall, 
in the right arm and hand ; made an escape to Duncannon, thence 
to Scilly, and the Isle of "Man ; went to Scotland, sent a letter to 
his majesty, and represented my services, &c. which was favour- 
ably accepted ; for no sooner had the king notice of my coming, 
but immediately I had admittance and kissed his hand, and com- 
mended me to the Duke of Buckingham,, then present; came to 
England, was in the engagement of Warrington and Worcester, 
where I kept the field till the king fled; and in the evening, the 
gates being full of flying persons, I leaped over the wall by myself 
only, travelled the country, and lay three days under bushes and 
hedges, because of the soldiery, till I came to Sir John Packing- 



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100 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

tou'» wood*, where I lay five days ; and afterward came on foot to 
London, by the name of James Brown; lodged five weeks in Lon- 
don, and was taken November 9th, 1651, at Dowry's the barber, 
near Dunstan's church, in Fleet-street. This is all that was de- 
clared by him, who remains captived in close prison in the gaol of 
Newgate. — James Hind. 

ABRAHAMUS WOOFE, JEf.60; emblems; batik 
at bottom. 

Among the curious pamphlets in the British Museum, is one 
entitled, " The Tyranny of the Dutch against the English, wherein 
is exactly declared the (almost invaluable) loss which the Com- 
monwealth of England hath sustained by their usurpation, and 
likewise the sufferings and losses of Abraham Woofe, then factor at 
Lantorc. and others in the island of Banda ; never published before, 
formerly collected in loose sheets by Mr. Woofe himself, and now 
illustrated and extracted out of his papers by John Quarks. 
London, printed by John Crowch and Thomas Wilson, and are to 
be sold at Mr. Woofe's house over the Water Gate, in Cole Harbour, 
. 1653 ; 8vo. 86 pages. 

The title-page shews Woofe was in England ; we gather this also 
from the following lines in the explanation of the frontispiece, is 
which is Woofe's portrait. 

" Bui Heav'n thought good, to make this truth appear 
Bv Woofe ; then clouded then, now shining htn." 
The frontispiece represents the cruelties of the Dutch, after the 
taking of Lantore. The dedication to Oliver Cromwell is signed 
" Abraham Woofe.'' 

The following anonymous portraits belong to the 
Interregnum, or the reign of Charles II. 

A half length of a man, THOMAS MANLEY;p«- 
fixed to his "Paraphrase on Job;''' hair, Mack cap, sash, 
and shoulder-knot ; four verses: 

" The pencil can no more," &c. 
T. Cross sc. Svo. 



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OF ENGLAND. 101 

Another portrait vf a man in a loose robe, black cap, 
hort falling band; " Firma nobis Fides,"' in a label 
ver the arms. Faithorne sc. 

A man in a cloak, holding a pen; with several verses: 
" This picture represents a heavenly mind," &c. 

f. Cross sc. Vlmo. 



REMARKS ON DRESS. 



It appears by the broad seal of Charles II. in Sandford, dated 
1653, that he wore, long hair and whiskers. It also appears from 
the prints of him, in Sir William Lower's account of his entertain- 
ment at the Hague, the same year, that he sometimes wore a large 
cravat, and, at other times, a long falling band with tassels. His 
ruffles were large, his doublet short, his boots were also short, with 
large tops, his hair long, with a lock on the right side much longer 
than the rest. 

Mr. Benlowes, in his " Theophila," published in 1652, has given 
us a print of a man of mode. In his hat, the brim of which is ex- 
tended horizontally, is a large feather : it inclines much to the right 
side, as if it were falling off his head. His hair is very long, his 
ruffles are double, his doublet reaches no lower than the waistband 
of his breeches ; bis sword is enormous, and suspended to a belt, 
which comes over his right shoulder ; his breeches are large, with 
puffs like small blown bladders, quite round the knees ; his boots 
are very short, with fringed lops, which are near as ample in their 
dimensions as the brim of his hat.* It appears from the same 
author, that black patches were sometimes worn by the beaux a"t 
the time of the Interregnum, f Short hair, short bands, long cloaks, 

and long visages, frequently occur in the portraits of this period. 

• See "Theophila," p. J10. 

t Ibid. p. 194, Stanza viii. — At this period, a bill against ttie lice of painting, 
"caring black patches, and immodest dress of women, was read in the House of 
Commons. See the " Parliamentary History." 

At the tame lime was published a pamphlet, entitled "The Loathsomeness of 
hag Hair, with an Appeudii against Painting, Spots, naked Breasts,'' otc- 

Patches, which derived their origin from the Indians, were called, in the dialect 
•f the vulgar, beauty lauttj but were, in reality, spots of deformity, and would have 



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102 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

Mr. Benlowes bu also given us prints of two ladies, engraved 
by Hollar; one in a summer, the other in a winter dress. The 
former is without a cap, has her hair combed like a wig, except 
that which grows on the crown of the bead, which is nicely braided, 
and rounded in a knot. Her neck-handkerchief is surrounded with 
a deep scalloped lace, and ber cuffs are laced much in the k 
manner. The sleeves of her gown have many slashes, through 
which her linen is very conspicuous : ber fan is of the modern make. 
The latter is represented in a close black hood, and a black mask,* 
which just conceals her nose. She wears a sable tippet, and holds 
a large muff of the same kind, which entirely bides her arras. 

The strings of the falling band hung down to the breast, with 
tassels or other curious work, to which some would foppishly add 
other ornaments, as the old epigram following shews : 

" A reverend dean, with band slarch'd and clean, 

Wu to preach before the king; 
In Ilia band- strings was spy'd a ring there was tj'd. 

Was not Ibat a pretty thing 1 
The ring without doubt, was the thing put him out ; 

That be could not tell what was neat; 
For all that was there, did say and declare 

He handled It more than the text." 

been so esteemed bad they been natural. Sir Kenelm Digby informs u, lb 
following fact was well known to all the English court. 

A lady, wbo was his relation, and who, as be any*, was " niece of Portesc 
daughter of Count Arundel," made him a visit. She was then in all the pi 
her beauty, which she endeavoured to heighten with artificial embellishment 
wai particularly nice in her patches, to which Sir Kenelm had an aversion 
brought several arguments to dissuade her from the use of these savage ornai 
Among others, as she was with child, be said, " Have you no appreheusio 
your child may be bom with half-mouns upon bis face ; or rather, that all Ihe 
which you bear up and down in small portions, may assemble in one, and app 
the middle of his forehead ?" This reroonjtrance occasioned her leaving i 
practice of patching ; but his words made such an impression upon ber imagic 
that the daughter of whom she was then pregnant, was bom with a spot " as large 
ai • crown of gold," in the middle of her forehead. — Digby's "Discourse concern- 
ing the Powder of Sympathy," p. 101, edit. 1658. 

* It is well known (hat the mask has concealed many immoralities, and that it 
was long worn by women of intrigue, and prostitutes of trie town. Dryden, in tbt 
epilogue to his " Love Triumphant," mentions " Masks and Misses"! as persons ol 
much the same character. It was indeed frequently worn by women of the strictest 
virtue; and generally on the first night of a comedy, in the reign of Charles II. 

t The word Milt was formerly used for a woman of ill fame. 



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OF ENGLAND. 103 

John Owen, dean of Christ Church, and vice-chancellor of Ox- 
ord, went in querpo, like a young scholar, with powdered hair ; his 
land -strings with very large tassels, a large set of ribands at his 
:nees, with tags at die end of them; Spanish leather boots with 
arge lawn tops, and his hat mostly cocked. 

After the close-stool-pan sort of hat, came in the sugar-loaf or 
Mgh-crowned hat ; these, though mightily affected by both sexes, 
were so very incommodious, that every puff of wind blowing them 
sff, they required the almost constant employment of one hand to 
secure them. 



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BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 



APPENDIX 



THE INTERREGNUM. 



FOREIGNERS. 



HENRICUS CAROLUS DE LA TREMOU- 
ILLE, &c. nobilissimi Ordinis Garterii Eques; in 
armour. P. Philippe sc. 

Charles de la Tremouille, styled " Prince de Tarente," was sob 
of Henry de la Tremouille, duke of Thovars. He was elected 
knight companion of the Garter, together with Henry, duke of 
Gloucester, in 1653, at Paris; was installed at Windsor, in April, 
1661. He died in his father's lifetime, the 14th of September, 
1672. 

He was husband of the Princess of Tarente, so often mentioned 
in the letters of Madam de Sevigne. 

There is a print by Nantueil, after Ckampaigne, of 
HENRY of ORLEANS, duke of Longueville and 
Crequi. 

This was probably the same person that was sent ambassador to 
Cromwell, together with Mancini, nephew to Cardinal Mazarine. 

ERIC ROSENKRANTZ, Signeur de Rosenheim, 
&c. A.F.f. a small bust in Hofman. 

Eric Rosenkrantz, who visited England in the reign of Charles I. 
from a motive of curiosity, was, in 1 652, sent hither on an extra- 
ordinary embassy, in conjunction with PEDER REETZ, of whom 
Hofman has also given us a print. Cromwell who considered 



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OF ENGLAND. 105 

Lceenkrantz as a young minister without experience, asked him 
rhether there were many such forward geniuses among the Danes 
rho wore qualified to -manage the arduous affairs of state before 
iiehr beards were grown ? Roeenkrantz, who had occasion for all 
•is temper and discretion not to say too much or too little upon 
his attack, replied, with on admirable firmness, "Sir, my beard, 
hough it be young, is, however, older than your republic. 1 ' The 
Protector, from this smart reply, conceived a different opinion of 
lira, and treated him with much higher regard.* He died in 
1681. Peder Recti, lord of Tygestrup, died in 1674, taaving.beea 
chancellor, pi wy -counsellor, and chief treasurer, to the King of 
Denmark. 

JACOBUS CATS, Browershavius, Ord. Holl. 4 
Advocatus, SigillorumCustos, &c. Ob. 12 Sept. 1660; 
without the engraver's name. 

Jacobus Cats; in an oval; supported by many 
Cupids ;M. 77,1655; folio. 

This eminent person is memorable as a lawyer, a politician, and 
a poet. He came first into England to consult Dr. Butler, in a 
hectic case ; and, twice afterward, hi quality of ambassador, in the 
reign of Charles 1. and in the protectorate of Cromwell, having 
been here at toe time of the engagement betwixt Blake and Tromp. 
He soon after retired to Chelsea, where his lodging, and that of 
two others who were joined with him in the embassy, was sur- 
rounded by soldiers. This greatly alarmed them : but, as Crom- 
well told him upon his complaint, it was to prevent their being torn 
to pieces by the mob, who were extremely exasperated against the 
Dutch. He and his colleagues were hereupon secretly sent away 
with great care and dispatch by command of the Protector. 

MENASSEH BEN ISRAEL. Rembrandt f. 1636; 
etched with uncommon nature and spirit, 4to. See the 
" Catalogue of the Works of Rembrandt/ .No. 260. 

Mf.jjasseh Ben Israel, M. 38, 1642. Salem 
Italia. 

* " Hofnun," ailic. RoiSHMiras, p- SO. 



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106 BIOGRAPHrCAL HISTORY 

Henasseh Ben Israel, a learned rabbi and physician, ahd the 
chief of the Jaws who resided in the Low Countries, was an agent 
in their behalf with the Protector for their settlement in England; 
for which he is said, by several writers, to have offered him 20O.00W. 
but upon condition, that St. Paul's cathedral should have been 
appropriated to their use* This tempting proposal persuaded 
Cromwell, at least he pretended to be persuaded, that the cause 
of the Jews was the ■ cause of God, and that their establishment 
would be in order to then- conversion, as Christianity, in its purity, 
was to be found in England, particularly among the Independents. 
This met with the strongest opposition from the generality of the 
people, especially the clergy; several of whom, contrary to the 
instructions which they had received from Cromwell, exerted the 
whole force of their arguments against the rabbi, in a set dispu- 
tation, and backed it with all the weight of their authority. Heath, 
in his " Flagellum,"t tells us, that Oliver " gulled the Jews of their 
eai nest-money." Mention is made of several of Ben Israel's works 
in the Bodleian Catalogue. His " Vindiciee Judsorum," published 
soon after his return to Holland, has been mentioned to his credit 
by several writers, who, though no friend to the Jews,' were in- 
clined to do justice to his uncommon candour and abilities. The 
completes! account of his character and writings is in Wolfius's 
" Bibliotheca Hebreea.'' 



CHRISTIAN RAVIUS, of Berlin, of whom there 
is a print in 12rao. which corresponds with that of 
Williams, or Willisum, was, at this time, a professor 
of Hebrew in London. 



* Tovejjin bis " Anglia Judaica," p. 3 59, ibjs, " As soon as King Charles n 
murdtsied, the Jam petitioned tbe annual of war to endeavour ■ repeal of thit act 
of parliament which had heen made against them, promising, in return, to make 
them a present of 500,0001. provided that the* could likewise procure the cathe- 
dral of St. Paul to be assigned them for a synagogue, and the Bodleian library at 
Oifortl lo begin their traffic with; which piece of service, it seems, was undertaken, 
by those ftonwf, nun, at the solicitation of Hugh Peters and Hiny Marten, whom 
tlie Jewa employed as their broken, but without any success."? ■ See what Torey 
says of Menasseh Ben Israel, p. 2BQ, &c. 

t P. 167. 

( Moutelh's « History of Gnat Britain," p. 473. 



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OF ENGLAND. 107 

ChristianusRaviub, Berlins; in an oval ; JEt. 32; 
ships in the distance; 12mo. This was afterward altered 
to Williams. 

After he had spent about eight years in foreign universities, he, 
in 1613, became a sojourner at Oxford. He was, for his oriental 
learning, patronised by Archbishop Usher ; and was, by Grotkis, 
recom mended and introduced to Cardinal Richelieu, who would have 
sent him. as his agent into the Eastern countries; but he declined 
the proposal, alleging his attachment to the archbishop, who was 
indeed a very generous patron. It is certain, that he was at Con- 
stantinople in 1639, and that he there became acquainted with the 
learned Pococke. In 1648, having taken the covenant, he was, by 
the powers in being, appointed fellow of Magdalen College, in 
Oxford. Mr. Wood, whose account of him is chiefly taken from 
the dedication of his "Discourse .of the Oriental Tongues," ad- 
dressed to Primate Usher, has mentioned all his writings, of which 
this " Discourse," is the most considerable. He is censured, in 
" Dr. Pococke's Life,"* as a man of little judgment and great in- 
discretion in his conduct. He died in Germany, in 1677. His 
portrait is prefixed to his " Grammar of the Oriental Languages," 
8vo. 1649. 

JOANNES RULITIUS, Kirchbergas natus 1602; 
Mt. 50. Heidelbergam redux; Ministerio functus 
Dorcestriee annos 5 ; Heidelbergse, 1 ; Amstelodami 
in Ecclesia Anglica, 4; ibidem in Germatiica, 13. C. 
Dttsarl ad vivum del. J. Brower sc. four Latin verses; 
A.M. 

D. Johannes Rulitius, &c. four Dutck verses ; 
half sheet. H. de Mayer f, 

1 have placed this person here according to the date of his age; 
perhaps improperly. I know no more of him than what is inscribed 
on hU print. 

• P. 14, &c. 33. St. 



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108 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

AEONAPAOS *IAAPA2, YI02, IQANNOY, A©H- 
NAI02. Gaud Mellon del, et sc. h.sk. See a particu- 
lar description of this print in Florent Le Compte. 

Leonard Philabas. Piccino, advivum, 1653. 

Leonard Pbilaras, a native of Athens, waa minuter from tie 
Duke of Parma to the King of France. He was a man of emi- 
nent learning, and one of Milton's foreign correspondents. In bis 
Twelfth Epistle, which is addressed to him, he mentions die re- 
ceipt of one of his letters, together with this head: " missan* deinde 
salutem cum etsgie," Ac. In his Fifteenth, which is particular!} 
curious, he gives him a circumstantial account of his blindness. 
PhUaras, who deplored his calamity, made hhn a visit in London, 
and encouraged him not to despair of a cure. Milton was then 
Latin secretary to the Protector. 

"RIGEP DANDULO, a Turk by seven descents, 
came into England with Abde Aga, agent from the 
illustrious Hamet Basha, of Argier; and was here 
baptized into the Christian faith, by Mr. Gunning,* 
at Exeter chapel, in the Strand, Nov. 8, 1657."— 
Cross sc. Before Dr. Warmstry's " Narrative of his 
Conversion" 1658 ; \2mo. 

RigepDandulo; in Coalfield's " Remarkable Per- 



RigepDandulo descended from the noble family of the Danduli 
at Venice, was the only son of a silk-merchant in the isle of Tzio. 
He came into England from a motive of curiosity, and was enter- 
tained in the house of Lady Laurence, at Chelsea, with whose son 
he had been formerly acquainted at Smyrna. Dr. Warms try, who 
visited this lady, was strongly inclined to attempt his conversion; 
though Dandulo was ignorant of the languages with which the 
doctor was acquainted. Lady Laurence and her family came 
heartily into this pious design, Mr. Peter Gunning offered to 

* Afterward Bishop of El v. 



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OF ENGLAND. 109 

;c*n<f J)r. Warastry ia his arguments ; and Mr. Stuaote, chaplain 
(the Bui of Elgin, and a good proficient iutha Turkish language, 
ndertook die office ef an interpreter. Danduto at first appeared 
stjeotely averse rYsm changing his religion ; but his mind was 
trangely wrought upon by a dream, which was more efficacious 
ban every other motive ; and lie was soon after baptized at Exeter- 
.Ojuse,. ia th« presence of several persona of distinction. In the 
' Narrative" is a long discourse of dreams of the providential kind, 
ad a detail of the arguments used for bis conversion.* 

CATHARINE LETHIEULLIER, bom 8 Jan. 
1587 ; married Jacob Desbouvrie, of Killeghorn, in 
Holland, September 9, 1630. T. Luttickuys f. anno 
1656 ; a half length, sitting in a chair. 

Catharine Le Thieullier, or Lethieullier, as now written,, was 
daughter of John Le Thieullier, a gentleman of Flemish extraction, t 
who resided chiefly in Germany, by Jane Frappe., daughter of John 
Frappe, of Tournay, who married, to her second husband, John de 
Weez, of Frankfort, who deceased in 1604, in two years after their 
marriage. In July, the following year, she came over to England, 
with her son John Le Thieullier, and her daughter Catharine, who 
was born on the 8th of January, 1587; married on the 9thofSep- 
tember, 1630, to Mr. Jacob des Bouverie, minister of Killeghorn, 
in Holland; and died in 1664, aged 77. She probably left no 
issue, as she was in or about her 43d year when she married. She 
lies buried, with her mother, in the church of St. Helen's le- Grand. 
She was great-great-aunt of Sir James Burrow, knight, master 
of the crown-office, and fellow of the Royal and Antiquarian So- 
cieties ; and also of Smart Lethieullier, esq. who was also fellow of 
the same societies ; and of John Loveday, esq. of Caversham, in 
Oxfordshire. The present family of Desbouverie are collaterally 



* In Keanet'a " Re^irier and Chronicle," voder July, 1660, is this puwge) 
" Upon reading tils petition of Philip Daudulu, ■ convert Turk (bit rnajutj being 
p™«nt), it ii ordered ih»i ii ikall be teaxuropiuka lo ttw miniatnn of London, wU> 
•re deiiitj to collect the charity nnd benevolence of all well-disposed penoni 
■ilhin their aeneral parishes." Keniict informs us, that another petition for his 
linker relief •»» read and granted at the couiiciUbonrd. on the 8th of Much, 1660- 1. 

t Mia father was martyred for tils religion, at Valenciennes, ui Halnaull, under 
Ik Doke of Alva's aduinialrntion. 



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110 BIOGRAPHICAL BISTORT 

related to this lady. Mr. Smart LeiluewUier had a very good pic- 
ture of her, which i» now in the possession of Edward HnJae, esq. 
of Aldersbrook, in Eaaei, who married the only child of Charles 
Lethieullier, brother to Smart, and aole harem of both theae | 



Vera Effigies DOMINI BLASII de Manfre, Ne- 
tini, Siculi, JEt. 72, 1651 ; in an oval. W.Hotlar feat. 

Blasii de Manfre; in Caul/kid's "Remarkable 

Persons*' 

He it represented standing against a pillar, and again, at a dis- 
tance, upon a stage, spouting water in a large and violent stream 
from his ear. Near him is a long double row of glasses; above 
him is the' sun in full splendour, with this inscription, " Solas skat 
Sol i" also Fame with two trumpets, and another inscription, " Fanut 
volat." Under the oval are sixteen Latin verses, which inform ot 
of his drinking water in large quantities, and discharging it from 
his stomach converted into various sorts of wine, simple- waters, 
beer, oil, and milk; and performing this before -the emperor and 
several kings. It is certain, that, he was one of the moat wonderful 
jugglers that ever appeared in the world, and that he was, by the 
generality of the people, and even by some persons of rank and 
eminence, regarded as a magician. But those who are acquainted 
with the effects of drugs, the tricks of legerdemain, and the w 
derful faculties of the human frame, may account for it, strange as 
it is, without imputing it to supernatural powers. He was certainly 
in Germany, France, and several other countries of Europe, but 
very prudently declined going to Spain, for fear of the Inquisition. t 
The late Mr. James West asserted, that he lived long in England. 

* This article »»s communicated by Sir James Burrow. 

t II it certain, that, in my remembrance, a horse, which bad been taught to fell 
Ihe spots upon cards, the hour of tiie day, be. by significant tokens, was, together 
with his owner, put into (be Inquisition, as if lliey had both dealt with the deri); 
but the supposed human criminal snoii convinced tbc inquisitors that lie was an 
honest juggler ; and that his horse was as innocent as any beast in Spain. 



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OF ENGLAND. 



CHARLES II. WAS RESTORED ON HIS 
BIRTH-DAY, MAY 29, 1660. 



CLASS I. 
THE ROYAL FAMILY. 

CHARLES II. on horseback ; crown on his head ; 
cavalcade underneath ; Overton ; sheet. 

Charles II. on horseback, as in the coronation pro- 
cession. Gaywoodf. 1661; large sh. There is another 
print of him, with the same procession, by Chantry. 

The horse on which- the Icing rode at his coronation, was bred 
and presented to him by Thomas, lord Fairfax, the parliament 
general. 

Charles II. ^(.30, 1660. W. F. invenit, J.Ch. sc. 
in armour'; h. sh. 

Carolus II. Lelyp. Lutterelf. 4to. mezz. 

Caeolus II. Lelyp. Becketf. small; mezz. 

CarolusIL Lelyp. sold by Brown;* whole length; 
sitting; large h. sh. mezz. 

Charles II; Lelyp. Thomson arc. sitting; h.sh. 
mezz. 

Charles II. Lelyp. Blootelingf. 1680; h.sh. 
mezz. 

• Prubabl j the enp»Tcr. 



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112 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

C a ro lus II. Lely p. Vandrebanc sc. almost as large 
as the life. 

Charles II. Lely p. Vertue sc. 1736. Fromapk- 
ture in Bridewell Hall, London; h.sh. Oneofthetet 
of Kings. 

Cakolus II. &c. Lily p. Faberf. 1750; whole 
length; sh. mezz. From an original in the possession 
of the Duke of Richmond. 

Cabolub II. Wissingp. Vandervaartf. h.sh. mezz. 

Cakolus II. Kneller p. R. White sc. 1679; sh. 

Mr. Walpole observes, that 'Robert White took the first print tie 
ever engraved from the works of Kneller. 

Carolus II. Kneller p. Becketf.. coronation robes; 
whole length; large h.sh. mezz. 

Carolus Secundus. Kneller p. Smith f. h.sh. 

Carolus Secundus. ( Kneller p.) Smith f 'Ma. mezz. 

Carolus Secundus. (Kneller p.") J. Smith and 
Roger Williams f. h. sh. mezz. 

Carolus II. Kneller p. R. Williams f. Sold by J- 
Smith. The following inscription which was very pro- 
bably written by Smith himself, is on the proof, which 
was m the collection of Mr. Spencer, miniature-painter: 
" Drawn, begun, and finished by J. Smith ; awl 
the head entirely by Smith." In the same hand is 
"J. Smith f." 



* Though the pirn ler"* name i> not engraved on ihis print and Ibe next itow. 
they *n "Known to be done rfte^Kudlrr. 



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OF ENGLAND. - 113 

Charles II. Knellerp. Skilman sc. large h.sh. 

CharlesII. Knetlerp. Picart sc. direr. 1724 ; Ato. 

Carolus II. J. Riley p. W. Fatthorne (junior) f. 
h.sh. mezz. 

The king's remark upon the original portrait was, " That if it was 
ike him, he was a very ugly fellow." But the painter, who was 
an excellent artist, certainly did him justice. 

CharlesII. own hair, slit sleeves, Fatthorne exc. 
Ato. 

Carolus II. arms of England', 8$c. at the four cor- 
ners of the print. Faithorne sc. large h. sh. 

There is another, by the same hand, in octavo. 



Charles II. in armour; sU' English verses. Fat- 
thorne sc. 

Carolus II. Hollar f half length; h.sh. 

Carolus II. a head in a square. Hollar f. 8vo. 

Carolus II. rex, &c. Hollar f Bvo. 

Carolus II. standing; emblematical figures. C, 
Schut invenit. All but the face is done by Hollar, sh. 

Charles II. in armour; half length; inscribed, 
" Redivivo Phamci Carolo," fyc. Emblematical fi- 
gures, a phcenix, <§r. engraved by Hollar ; the portrait 
is by another hand. 

Charles II. on horseback. Diepenbeck invenit; 
Cauherckenf. emblematical figures; sir French verses; 



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114 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

Charles II. on horseback, with a small view -of 
Whitehall, royal oak, ship, 8$c. neat; 4to. 

Carolus II. &c. a bust in the frontispiece to Sprat's 
" History of the Royal Society." Hollar f. 4/o. 

Chabi.es II. hat and feather. Gaywoodf. h. sh. 

Charles II. &c. sold by Stent ; h. sh. 

Carolus II. Hertochsf. small ; 8vo. 

Carolus II. done from a fine medal of him. Bloote- 
lingf. mezz. small. 

Carolus II. Loggansc. large falling band; star 
and garter ; oval. 

Carolus II. Loggansc. in armour. Before Ross's 
translation of '*' Silius Italicus ;" fol. 

Charles II. Loggan sc. without the king's name; 
inscribed, " Fidei Defensor." 

Charles II. view of a sea-fight. J. de Ram ere. 

Charles II. on horseback; 4fo. Van Merlen. 

Charles II. in an octagon ; Bouttats; small. 

Charles II. in an octagon ; V. Merlin ; quarto. 

Charles II. Kneller; P.Vandrebanc; sheet. 

Charles II. in an oval', on a pedestal, on which 
are the arms of England; fourteen English versa; 
Daneker Danckcrts; folio. 

The portrait seems by Van Dalen. 

Charles II. half length'; in an oval ; sitting in hit 
robes; crown and sceptre; crown, lion, and unicorn, at 



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OF ENGLAND. US 

he corners. (Faithome.) Sold by R&bt. Gibbs. From a 
ermon preached at his coronation in Scotland, before the 
•attic of- Worcester; Ato, 

Charles II. in a Van Dyck dressy when prince and 
luke of Cornwall ; in an oval; small folio. W.Faithome; 
'are, 

Charles II. sitting and holding a charter in his 
hand; in the title to Wood's " Historia et Antiquitates 
Universitatis Oxoniensis." A.D.Hemsus; R. White. 

. Charles II. sis Latin verses, " Aspice quern Re- 
ducem Pietas" <§-c. a good portrait ; no name of en- 
graver. 

Charles II. in an oval; " h Hani soil qui mal y 
pense" 8vp. style of Hollar. 

Charles II. several good portraits m Simons "Me- 
dals;" Ato. fyc. 

Cauolus Secundus'; in an oval of laurel; motto, 
rose and thistle ; engraved by R. White, when a youth ; 
Ato. 

Cakoujs II. R. White sc. whole length ; frontispiece 
to Pitt's "Atlas;" targe h. sh. 

Caholus II. R.White sc. three prints, in 8vo. oval. 

Carolus II. Vandrebanc* sc. garter robes; large sh. 

Chahles II. W. Sherwin sc. whole length ; h.sh. 

Carolus II. Sherwin sc. laurel chaplet ; Atp. 

* Sonetimei sptli ymjierfmnk. 



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116 BIOGRAPHICAL H1STOKT 

Charles II. R. Naaompmr. JtOifii m. 

Carolus II. Sherwinf. 1669; large sheet; ■ 

Carolus II. Van Hove sc. 8eo. 

Charles II. in armour; in hi* right hand it a 
sword; his left points to a celestial crown, nueriW 
" Carolus ad Carolum;" various emblems. VattHovetc. 
8vo. 

Cakolus II. hat and feather. P. S. crcutt. 4to. 

Charles II. sitting. E.le Davis tc. The face vat 
afterward erased, and that of King William msericd. 

Carolus II. sold by Becket; Ato. mezz. 

Carolus II. J. S. (Smith) f. E. Cooper esc. wkok 
length; Ato, mezz, 

Carolus II. &c. R.Colef. h.sh. mezz. Thisprat, 
which was engraved by Sir Ralph Cole, is very scam 
so is the following. 

Charles II. Francis Place f. mezz.* 

Carolus II. Edward Rixonf, h. sh. mezz, 

Carolus II. oval frame; above, " Fidei Defensor ; 
below, " Dim et Mm Droit." 

Carolus II. holding a sceptre in his right hand; on 
a table are three crowns; Ato, 

Carolus II. a head in a flaming heart, on whichpd 
three crowns. 

* Mentioned in Vertue'i MS, 



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OF ENGLAND. 117 

Charles II. inscribed, " God save the King ;" Ato. 

Charles II. sitting in a chair of state; collar of 
e Garter, fyc. 

Carolus II. Gonzales Cocques p. Q.Boelf. aqua 
irti, h. sk. 

Carolus II. Willemsenf. oval ; sixEnglish verses. 

Carolus II. Willemsen f. in armour ; h.sh. 

Carolus II. Phil, a Gunst sc. oval ; foliage ; large 
i. ah. 

Carolus Stuart II. Koninck van England, 8$c. Ato. 

Carolus II. &c. his statue in the Royal Exchange. 
Gibbons fecit. P.Vandrebancsc. large sheet.* 

Carolus II. &c. on horseback; sold by Garret; h.sh. 

Carolus II. &c. on horseback. A.deBlois sc. h.sh. 

Charles II. on horseback; by N.Visscher; Ato. 

Charles II. and his Queen ; whole lengths; stand- 
ing ; the arms of Great Britain betwixt them ; oblong 
h. sh. Stent. 

Charles II. and his Queen; two plates, byVertue; 
head-pieces in the quarto edition of Waller's Works. 

Carolus et Catharina. Frederick Hendrick van 
Hove sc. ornaments : large sh. 

* Gibboni is uid to hwe hid " an exclusive licence for the sole priming of this 
'Ulut, and prohibiting all persons to engrave it without his leave." — " Anecdote* 
«( Painting," Sic. iii. p. 84, note*. 



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118 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

Charles II, and his Queen ; the Duke of Fort, 
the Prince of Orange, Prince Rupert, the Duke of 
Monmouth, and General Monk. J. Clark sc. 



HISTORICAL PIECES. 

CHARLES II. and his Queen, sitting; the arch- 
tishop of Canterbury and the clergy presenting an ad- 
dress ; lords and ladies of the court. 

■ Charles II. with his Queen Joining hands; ashed; 
Van Heven ; scarce. 

Charles II. receiving the Jirst pine-apple culti- 
vated in England, from Rose the gardener, at Dow- 
ney Court, Bucks, the seat of the Dutchess of Cleveland. 
R.Gravesc. 

Charles II. sitting in a chair of state; Archbishop 
Sancroft and F. Lord Guildford standing by him. 
W.F. Before Chamberlayne"s " Present State ,-" 8vo. 

Charleb II. "A Ra-ree Skotve ;" the king is re- 
presented blowing bubbles, with a box at his back, 
and going up a bridge, " West-ward Hoy " attended 
by three persons, one with a mace, (officers to both 
Jiousest) — The king is again represented with a show- 
box at his back ; half way up his legs in mire ; three 
persons pushing him back ; and putting the lords 
mud commons into the show-box, transformed into 
popes or bishops. The king has two faces, repre- 
senting the Protestant religion and popery. The 
dresses covered with female faces; to the right, 
a view of Oxford, and Louse Hall- A. Pare. Ctt- 



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OF ENGLAND. 119 

nt$ and rare, supposed to be published by Stephen 
tllege. The printer was fined 500/. for publishing it. 

Charles II. in a sheet of letter-press, inscribed 
The manner of his Majesty's curing the Disease called 
e King's Evil" F. H. Van Hove sculp, London, 
rintedfor Dorman Newman ; scarce. 

Chables II. and his Queen, receiving Ogilby's book 
f subscriptions for his " Survey of the Roads ;" 4to. 

Charles II. on his throne, presenting a charter or 
nstrument to the university of Oxford. Before Wood's 
'Historia e.t Antiqutiates Universitatis Oxonientu ;" 
ol. 1674. 

Charles II. attended by several of the nobility, 
-lergy, fyc. and William Prynne presenting a book to 
Mm. Frontispiece to the first volume of his " Records," 
infoiio, sh. . 

Charles II. on his throne; Archbishop Sheldon on 
his right hand, and Lord Clarendon on his left; General 
Monk in an oval below. Loggan sc. Ato. 

Chables II. leaning his hand on Archbishop Shel- 
don; a small head of General Monk at the bottom. 
Loggan sc. Before R. Atkyn's "Origin and Growth of 
Printing" 

Chaeles II. sitting in a chair of state; Archbishop 
Sheldon and the Earl of Shaftesbury standing by him. 
W. F. (Faithorne) f. Before several of the early editions 
of Chamber iayne's "Present State of England;" l2mo. 

Charles II, with Mrs. Lane, on horseback ; Mr. 
Lascelks riding before; four verses ; an etching. 



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120 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

Charles II. on his throne, touching for the etit', 
to Browne's "Charisma BasUicon," 1634; 800. R, 
White. 

Charles II. taking his departure from ScheveUttg; 
his portrait above, supported by angels. P. H. Schut. 

Charles II. holding his court, at the Hague; several 
by P. Phillipe, #c. 

Charles II. in council, giving orders for burning 
the Dutchfieet; the crown falling from his head; Lon- 
don inflames, fyc. very rare. 

Charles II. crowned 23d April, 1661, with tht 
Duke and Dutchess of York, the Lord-chancellor, Duke 
of Albemarle, Archbishop of Canterbury and York, 
Bishops of London, Winchester, Exeter, and Norwich; 
oblong sheet ; E. Smithfield; very rare. 

Charles II. and Donna Catharina? Queen; whole 
length; singularly habited; sold by Matthew Collins, in 
Cannon- street ; folio; scarce. 

Charles II. and his Queen Catharine, in their 
robes : the King is receiving with his right hand a 
wreath of flowers from the Queen '; Fame blowing her 
trumpet ; crown and globe on a table. P. WilUamsen delin. 
et sculp. 1662; rare. In the collection of A. H. Suther- 
land, esq, 

Charles II. though a genius, acted in direct opposition to everj 
principle of sound policy; and, in appearance, without propeositj 
to tyranny, made no scruple of embracing such measures as were 
destructive to the civil and religious liberties of his people. He 
chose rather to be a pensioner to France, than the arbiter of R>~ 
rope ; and to sacrifice the independence of his kingdom, and tbe 
happiness of his subjects, than to remit his attachment to indolence 
and pleasure. He, under the veil of openness and candour, con- 



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OF ENGLAND. 121 

cealed the deepest and most dangerous dissimulation. Though he 
was a slave to love, he appears to have been an entire stranger to 
the softer sentiments of pity and compassion. He was gay, affable, 
and polite ; and knew how to win the hearts, when he could no 
longer gain the esteem of mankind. He was so accustomed, for 
his own ease, to divest himself of his grandeur, that he seemed Co 
have forgot what belonged to his dignity as a king. 

Donna CATHARINA, siBter to Don Alfonso, pre- 
sent king of Portugal ; taken from the original as it 
was presented to Don Francisco de Meilo, ambassador 
of Portugal in London. R. Garwood J". 4to, 

Donna Catharina, daughter of John IV. king, of 
Portugal ; her hand on a crown ; h. sh. 

Donna Catharina, daughter of John IV. P. WU- 
liamsenf. Stent exc. h. sh. 

Donna Catharina, &c. Hollar/. 4to. 

Donna Catharina, Infanta; regina, &c. Van Hove 
sc. 9po. 

Donna Catharina, sereniss. Infanta, &c. h.sh. 

Catharina, &c. daughter to John IV. Z). aPlaats 
■p. A. de Bois sc. A. sh. 

Catharina, &c. D. a Plaatsp. A.de Boissc. large 
k.sh. 

Catharina, &c. Faithorne sc. In the dress in which 
she' arrived. Her hair is formally curled like a peruke; 
her gown black, with slashed sleeves; point handkerchief 
and ruffles, an ample farthingale, with laced petticoats, 
gloves in her left hand; h.sh- 

Catharina, &c. Ov erton, 1662; large h.sh. 



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122- BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

Catharina, &c. Lelyp. Becketf. Ato. mezz. 

Catharina, &c. Lelyp. Blootelingf. h.sh. 

Catharina, 8tc. Lelyp. Blootelingf. 1680; h.tk. 
mezz. 

Katharine, queen, &e. drawn in the character of 
St. Catharine, with her wheel. J . Huysman* p. Tomson 
ere, whole length ; ah. mezz. 

Catharina; in an oval, richly ornamented ; four 
English verses; sold by Matthew Collins, &;c. scarce. 

Catharine. Skerwinf. large sheet, mezz. oval; 
dedicated to Prince Rupert ; scarce. 

Catharine ; in the dress in which she came from 
Portugal; arms of Portugal at bottom. Loggansc. very 
rare. 

Catharina, &c. J. Huysman p. W.Sherwintc. 
in the character of St. Catharine ; whole length; sk. — 
There is a portrait of her in this character at Gor- 
hambury. 

Katharine, &c. Wissing p. Smith f whole length; 
large h. sk. 

C atharin a, &c. J. Bapt. Caspars p. E. le Davis 
sc. whole length; large h.sh. Before Pitt's " Atlas." 

Catharina, &c. Peter Williamsen f. large A. sh. 

Katharine, &c. G. Glover f. whole length ; Ato. 

Catharina, &c. Sherwinsc. oval; Ato. 

•t spell Huyunin, and II 



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OF ENGLAND. 123 

Catkarina, &c. Shertvinf.k.sh. mezx. 

Catharina, &c. in an ovalfoliage. J. Gammon sc. 
k. sk. 

Catharina, &c. ermincdrobe; collar of diamonds ; 
crass and pearl; very large sk. 

Catharine, consort of Charles II. pearls about her 
stays; crown, fyc. 

Catharina, &c. Coenraet (Conrad) Waumans sc. 
Martinus Vanden Enden exc. 4to. 

Catharina, &c. A. Lommelin sc. largeh.sk. 

Catharina, 8cc, Arnold de Jode sc. k. sk. 

The manners of this princess, especially at her first appearance 
at court, retained a strong tincture of the convent ; and were but ill 
formed to please, much less to reclaim, the polite and dissolute 
Charles. . She at first rejected the English dress, and the attend- 
ance of English ladies ; and chose to appear in the formal habit of 
her own country, and be attended by her duennas, whose persons 
were the scorn and the jest of every courtier. She, for some time, 
carried herself towards the royal mistress with all the disdain which 
she thought became her dignity and virtue: but when she saw that 
the king was resolved to retain her, she suddenly fell into the other 
extreme, and treated her with such excessive affability and conde- 
scension, as lost the little esteem he had for her. The first years 
of her marriage were rendered unhappy by almost every passion 
that could disturb a female mind. At length, every spark of con- 
jugal affection seemed to be extinguished, and she sunk into all the 
tranquillity of indifference. See the next reign. 

HENRIETTA MARIA, queen-mother; four 

French verses. [ 

Henrietta Maria, late queen; black veil; \2mo. 

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126 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

James, duke of York, when young, playing at ten* 
nis ; Merian. 

James, duke of York, &c. W. Richardsom. 

James, duke of York, 1684. Knelkr; J.VerkoMe; 
altered when king. 

James, duke of York; commander of this most nohk 
society of the artillerymen, in armour. W. Vaughantc. 
scarce; large 4to. 

James, duke of York, in armour, in a border of 
laurel. 

" England doth boast thy birth and riper yearea, 

But France and Flanders apeak the reat with teares." — L H- 

large 4to. scarce. 

James, duke of York. S. Luttichuys pins. R.Cooper 
sc. 

Jacobus, &c. supremus dominus admiraUius. 
Simon Luttichuys (Lutwich)p. Van Dalenjun.sc. large 
h. sh. 

James, duke of York. S.Cooper p. R.Williams j- 
h.sk. mezz. 

Jacobus, dux Eboracensis. D. Loggan sc. Before 
Pitt's "Atlas;" whole length ; large k.sh. 

Jacobus, dux Eboraci ; his right hand on hit 
breast. R. White sc. sh. This was altered when he 
was king. 

Jacobus, dux Eboraci. James Gammon sc. a large \ 
oval. 



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Hyjo e 



OF ENGLAND. 127 

Jacobus, dux Ebor. In the robes of the Garter. 
R, Wkitesch.sk. 

jlMES, duke of York; large as the life; in an oval 
E. le Davies sc. large sh. 

Rmxs, duke of York. M.Meriansc. 

»sies, duke of York ; oval; in armour ; arms, 8$c. 
]efour corners ; small ito. 

hes, duke of York, with Anne Hyde, bis dutche$s ; 
head-pieces ; a representation of a sea-fight in both, 
e sc. 

re is a portrait of James, Julie of York, with his dutches*, by 
fit' the Queen's House. 
Duke of York, though be bad a quick relish For pleasure, 
business with that closeness of application which the king 
hijiferother wanted ; and wanted himself that quickness of appre- 
liiWjrm triTtt natural sagacity and apparent benevolence of temper, 
wbaB fr was so conspicuous in the king. His notions of government 
wore as erroneous as those of his father and grandfather; and the 
large steps which his brother took towards arbitrary power, were in 
a great measure owing to his instigation. He was, what rarely 
happens, revengeful and valiant' almost in the same degree ; and 
displayed such courage in the first Dutch war, as rendered him 
more popular than all die other acts of his life. His bigotry to the 
Roman Catholic religion, which was still increasing with his years, 
had the strongest influence upon his conduct; and at length 
prompted him to such measures as were condemned by the sober 
and judicious of all religions. 

ANNE HYDE, dutehess of York. P. Lelyp.Lom- 
hart sc. four French verses-; * Telle est la charmante 
Duchexse" cjc. 

There is a copy of this head in a. latter edition of the translation 
of St. Evremond's works. It is inscribed, " The Dutchess of Ma- 



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128 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

Ani^e, dutchess of York. Smith f. Sold by Palmer ; 
small k.sh. 

Anne Hyde, &c. Vander Werffp. Simmone.au sc. 
k. sk. ... : 

'■ Anne Htde, dutcbess of York; mezz. Lely ; R. 
Thompson. 

Anne Hyde, &c. mezz. Wissing ; Williams. 

An n e Ht de, &c. Lely; J. L.Claessons; 1793. h 
Harding's " Grammont.'" 

Anne Hyde, &c. W. Richardson. 

Anne Hvde, &c. From a drawing in the collection 
of A. H. Sutherland, esq. in the " Noble Authors," by 
Park. 

Anne Hyde, dutchess of York. J. S. Agar sc-. 
1815 ; from the original of Sir P. Lely, in the collec- 
tion of the Right Honourable the Earl of Clarendon; 
in Lodge's " Illustrious Portraits." 

Anne, dutchess of York. Stent exc- h.sh. 

Anne, dutchess of York. Stent; 4*0. 

Her portrait, by Lely, which was once the property of her father, 
is now at Amesbury. 

Anne, dutchess of York, was the elder of the two daughters of 
the Lord-chancellor Clarendon.* She possessed, together with a 

* It is Mid that Lord Clarendon's wife was a woman of low londition, "bo 
walked to London from Trowbridge, in Wilts, and placed herself in the service of > 
brewer, who married her and left her a large fortune. On his death she conssllel 
Lord Clarendon (then Mr. Hyde, an attorney) as to her affairs ; and he nmrinl 
her, and by her had two daughters. The elder, Anne Hyde, was dutchess of York, 
wife of James IL by wbom she had two daughters, Queens Mary and Anne. In 
the house, where she resided at Trowbridge, Is a crown carved in wood, over one of 
the door*. — Biwdl»v. 



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OP ENGLAND. 129 

large portion of her father's understanding, the beauty and accom- 
plishments of her own sex in an extraordinary degree. She had 
a dignity in her behaviour, which was by some, who regarded her 
as Anne Hyde, rather than the dutches* of York, mistaken for 
haughtiness. She sometimes amused herself with writing, and 
made a considerable progress in the Life of the duke her husband, 
which she shewed to Dr. Burnet in manuscript ; but the work was 
never finished. Her misconduct before she was dutchess. of York 
was amply atoned for by her conduct afterward. Ob. 31 March, 
1671. 

MARIA, ducissa Eboraecnsis. Lelyp. Browne; 
h. sk. mexz. 

Maria Beatrix, &c. Lely p. Blootelingf. h.sh. 



The Dutchess of York. Wissingp. R. Williams f. 
h.sh. mezz. 

Maria Beatrix, &c. P. Vandrebanc sc. large 

h.th. 

Mart of Este, dutchess of York. R. White sc. 
whole length. 

Mart of Este, &c. R. White sc. Before " The 
History of the House of Este," 1681; Svo. 

The Dutchess of York. Smith f. whole length; h< sk. 
mezz. 

Mart, dutchess of York. P.Sckenckf.mezz.Ato. 

Maria, dutchess of York ; powers in each hand. 

There is a head of her, together with the duke's, in Lord Lam- 
down's "Poems," 4to. 1732. It was engraved by G. Vandei- 
gucht. See the rejgn of Jambs II. 

VOL. iv. s 



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130 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

The LADY ISABELLA, daughter of James, duke 
of York, and Mary his dutchess ; a child, with a chap- 
let of flowers on her head, and her left hand on the fore- 
head of a lamb; h.sh.mezz. Lely ; A. Browne. 

Lady Isabella ; with a dove; rnezz. Lely;E. 
Cooper. 

Lady Isabella, and Ann Hyde; rnezz. P.Lehj; 
A. Browne. 

■ Isabella, second daughter of James, by Mary of Bate, was born 
the 28th of August, 1676. She died the 2d of March, 1660. 

HENRICUS, dtix Glocestrise. Luttichuys (Lid- 
wich)p. C. van Dalen, junior, $c. largeh.sk. 

Henricus, dux Glocestrise, &c. J£t. 20. Lut- 
tichuys p. oval; \2rno. 

Henricus, dux Gloucestriae, &c. Filius terlius 
genitus regis Caroli primi. G. White sc. 

' Henricus, dux, &c. in the robes of the Garter; 
wkole length ; h. sh. 

Henry, duke of Gloucester. R. White sc. wkok 
length. 

Henry, duke of Gloucester. S. Luttichuys pinx. 
R. Cooper sc. 

Henry, duke of Gloucester; (Hollar j 8vo. 

Henry, duke of Gloucester, standing at a table, 
with' his sister Maria, P.' Dowager of Orange; sniall 
whole length, a death's head on the table ; A H.(ertochs.) 
A short view of the Lives; fyc. 166*1 ;-\2mo. 



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OF ENGLAND.. 131 

Henry, duke of Gloucester; a boy's head, inscribed 
M The Effigies" 8?c. spiritedly etched ; no name of artist, 
but probably Streeters. 

Henrf, duke of Gloucester. Vertue sc. 1736; k. sk. 
This belongs to the set of Kings; 

There is an oval half-sheet print of Prince Rupert, 
in armour, from a retouched and altered plate, with 
Stents name on it, thus inscribed: '* The Effigies of the 
high-borne Prince Henry, duke of Gloucester " fyc. 

There is a portrait of him in the Ashmoleao Museum. - 
The Duke of Gloucester was a young prince of great hopes, who 
possessed almost all the good qualities of his two brothers, without 
any of their bad ones. The king had an extraordinary lore and. 
esteem for him, the effect of his virtues and amiable deportment; 
and. was observed to be more deeply affected at his death, than 
with any calamity that had ever befallen him. Ob. 13 Sept. 1660, 
Mt. 20-21. See the reign of Charles I. 

The heads of the following princes and princesses are placed 
according to their heirship to the crown. 

MARIA, princeps Auriaca, Lelyp. Blootelingf. 
h. sh. mezz. . 

The Princess of Orange. Lelyp. R.Tompsonexc. 
h.sh. mezz. . ■ . 

The Princess of Orange. Lelyp. Printed for E. 
Cooper; h. sh. mezz. 

The Princess of Orange. Lely p. E. le Davis sc. 

Maria, princess van Orange. Lelyp. G. Valckf. 
1678. 

The Lady Mary was so far from being corrupted by a dissolute 
court, and a licentious age, that she maintained throughout her life 



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132 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

the raoit unaffected piety and Virtue. She was married, in this 
reign, to the Prince of Orange ; and made the moat exemplary wife 
to a man, who, when a hero in the bloom of youth, had scarce a 
■ingle quality to recommend him to the female sex. 

The LADY ANNE. Lelyp. Tompsonexc. k.sk. 
mezz. 

The royal Princess Anne, married to Prince George 
of Denmark. Nic. Visscher exc. large A. sh. See Nobk't 
" Continuation," vol. I. p. 17. 

MARY, princess of Orange, eldest daughter of 
Charles I. Harmemanp. 1660. Faithorne, junior, /. 
ft. sh. mezz. See the reign of Chahi.es I. 

The Prince of Orange. Lelyp. E.le Davissc. 

The Prince of Orange. Lelyp. soldby Browne; 
ft. sh. mezz. 

The Prince ofOitANGE. Lelyp. Tompsonexc. h.sh. 
mezz. 

Gulielmus Henricus, &c. Lelyp. Blootelingf. 
1678; ft. sh. mezz. . 

Gulielmus Henricus, &c. Lelyp. Blootelingf. 
1678; largeh.sk. 

Gulielmus Henricus, &c. Lelyp. G.Valcksc- 
mezz. large ft. sh. 

The Prince of Orange, young, in armour. Becitt 
exc. mezz. 

William, prince oi Orange; sold by R. Peak; 
h.sh. 

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OF ENGLAND. 133 

Gu i llaijme Henry, prince d'Orange. Ilagueneau 
p. P. Philippe sc. sh. 

The Prince of Oeange. C.vanDalensc. k.sk. 

Guili^ume Henri, princed'Orange. J. Verkolie*/. 
sh. mezz. 

Gulielmus Nassavius, Sec. oval; hat and feather; 
small 4to. 

Wilhelmus Henricus, &c. P. Bouttats sc. large 

n.sh. 

Wilhelmus III. prince van Orange, on horseback; 
the name of the horse, which is adorned with ribands 
reaches to the ground ; curious, 

Gulielmus, prince d'Oiznge; half sheet; G.Valck; 
altered when king. 

Gulielmus, prince d'Orange, on horseback ; P. 
Janse; H.Rokes; scarce. 

Gulielmus, prince, &c. in an octagon; VanMerlin. 

Gulielmus, prince, &c. in armour, crowned with 
laurel; Jas.Allard, 1660; fol. 

Gulielmus, prince, in his cradle. See Princess 
Mary, Class I. in the reign of Charles I. 

WiLHELMUs a Nassau, ftc. holding seven 
darts, in the same manner as they are held in the 
paw of the lion, in the arms of 'the seven United 
Provinces; 4to. 

TTiere is a portrait of him, by Netscher, in bis own hair, at 
Bulstrode. 



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134 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

1 When Lewis, 'XIV. invaded the United Provinces, the wfcole 
people were seized with such tenor, as nothing but the immediate 
dread of the horrible inundations to which those countries are sub- 
ject, could equal. Then it was that the .young Prince of Orange 
formed a resolution, which seemed to be the effect of despair itself, 
to deliver his country, or perish in the attempt. He soon gave ri- 
gour and dispatch to the councils of the States, infused a military 
spirit into their raw and undisciplined troops, and not only checked 
the rapid progress of Lewis, but ravished from his hands the towns 
he so perfidiously had taken. The most unjust, as well as the most 
trivial actions of this vainest of all princes, are committed to scnlp- 
■ture;* and 'even his courage has been immortalized. There is a 
print by Edelinck, after le Brun, which represents him on horse- 
back ; and just under his horse's feet is a figure partly man and 
.partly frog,' holding the darts of the Seven Provinces. But we 
.know that the courage of the young stadih older of these province! 
was as much superior to that of Lewis XIV. as the spirit of a fins is 
superior to that of a frog. ' 

ThePrince and Princess of ORANGE ; whole lengths, 
with tioo gentlemen and four young ladies of their court 
'in waiting; oblong k. sh. very rare. 

. The PRINCESS HENRIETTA. P. Williamsen x. 
.1661; h.sh. 

Henriette d'Angleterre, duchesse d'Orleans; a 
large sheet. 

Madame Henriette Anne,^ princesse de Is 
Grande Bretagne. C. M. (Claud Mellan) sc. a bust; 
Ato. 

■ Henriette Anne,&c. copied from the above. Vander 

^ . * See the prints engraved and printed »t the Louvre, partkulady flic vuImkcE 
t Slie was named Henrietta Maris, after Iter mother. See I be *' Bregnj*** 



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OF ENGLAND - . ' 135 

Werffp. (derm.) J. Audran sc. In Mans. Larrey's 
" History ;" fol. 

Henriette, &c. N. de L'Armessin sc. large h. sh. 

Henrietta Maria, dutchess of Orleans. Plattac, 
In Harding's " British Cabinet." 

Henrietta, &c. in an oval; L. Bouse ; 4to. 

Henrietta, &c. R. Peake. 

Henrietta, Sec. Des Rochers ; $vo. 

Henrietta, &c. 2Et. 17; octagon; \to. 

Henriette d'Angleterre, duchesse d'Orleans, 
Eponsfe le 13 Mars, 1661, Sec. in an octagon; 4to. 
stag hunt to the left; scarce; qu&re if the samcasmertr 
turned in the next above; Mo. 

There is a portrait of her at Dunham, the seat, of the Earl of 
Stamford, by Largilliere. There is another at Amesbury; and "a 
third, by Petitot, at Strawberry-hill. 

Henrietta Maria was the youngest daughter of Charles I. and 
wife to Philip, duke of Orleans, only brother of Lewis XIV.'. She 
was a woman of uncommon sense and vivacity, and in readiness of 
wit superior to the king her brother. She is said to have attracted 
the particular notice of Lewis, at the time that he extended his 
conquests over the ladies of his court, with as much rapidity as his 
generals did over the Spanish territories in the Netherlands,* She 
came over to England to attach her brother to the French interest ; 
and concluded a private treaty with him against the Dutch, which 
was much more for the advantage of Lewis than of Charles, but 
equally to the dishonour of both. . The duke her husband was cer- 
tainly jealous of her, and even suspected that too great familiarities 

• Bishop Buniet tells na, that Lewti's courtihip of Madame was " only a pii- 
tence to cover his addresses to Mademoiselle La Valiere, one of her maids of ho- 
nour i -whom he afterward declared openlj to be lib mistress, and who it well 
known to have loved him for bia own lake." 



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136 BIOGRAPHICAL BISTORT 

had passed betwixt her and his brother. Be is said to hire eaatd 
her to be poisoned soon after her return to France.* Ob. 30 June, 
1670, Mt, circ. 25. 

PRINCE RUPERT. Lely p. Tompson exc. robes of 
the Garter; k.sk. mezz. 

Rupertus, &c. totius Angliae vice-ad mirallus. 
Lely p. Blooteling exc. 1673; M. This is the most cha- 
racteristic and valuable print of Rupert. 

Prince Rdpeht. Lely p. Vansomerf. mezz. This 
print, which is mentioned in Virtue's manuscript, is pro- 
bably the same that has an it " Tomson excudit" which 
is in Vansomers manner. 

Prince Rupert, &c, SL Cooper p. etched by Brt- 
therton. The engraver gained muck credit by this print. 

Prince Rupert &c. vice-admiral, &c. Knellerf- 
R, White sc. large h. sk. 

Prince Rupert, &c. Faithorne sc. h.sh. 

Rupertus, Princeps, &c. in armour; standing ty 
the sea. His left hand is on a female head, adorned iM 
pearls; h.sh. 

Prince Rupert, who was a man of harsh features, a great ha- 
morist, and of little elegance in his manners or his dress, was bat 
indifferently qualified to shine in the court of Charles the Second. 
He made a much better figure in his laboratory, or at the head of 

• See Burnet, I. p. 301. Ludlow, III. p. 1ST. She declared to the dole bo 

husband, a little before she expired, " that she was the willinger to die, beaw 
her conscience upbraided her with nothing Dl in hei conduct towards him." — Fealoo'i 
•' Observation! on Waller's Poem to the Dutches) of Orleans." 

In the '< Gentleman's Magazine," far Julj, 1773, p. 324, 315, is a tfij remark- i 
able letter, concerning the death of that princess ; but it seems not to be tuffickail; 
authenticated. 



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OF ENGLAND. 187 

the fleet; in which station he was equal, in courage at least, to any 
of the sea-officers of this reign. He particularly distinguished himself 
in that memorable engagement in the second Dutch war, in which 
the brave Earl of Ossory commanded under him. He died at his n Adj. 
house in Spring-gardens, the 29th of Nov. 1682, aged 63. His 1673- 
jewels were valued at 20,000/. and among them was a pearl valued 
at no less than 8000?. See the, preceding reign ; see also Class VII. 
and X. in the present 

The Prince of HANOVER ; in armour ; battle at a 
distance; h. sh. mezz. 

George Lewis, duke of Brunswick and Lunenburg, as we are 
informed by Mr. Wood, came into England in 1680, to pay his 
respects to the Lady Anne, daughter of the Duke of York. He was 
then created, doctor of law, with great solemnity, at Oxford.* The 
manner of engraving evidently shews that the print was, done about 
this time. It has been mistaken for the portrait of his son, after- 
ward George II. and the battle for that of Oudenarde. 

The PRINCE, consort to the Princess ANNE. 

PRINCE GEORGE, &c. brother to the King of 
Denmark. Printed on the river Thames, 1683. 

Geohge, prince of Denmark; twoprints, one a large 
sheet. P. Vandrebanc sc.-\ See the following reign. 

• " Fasti Oxon." ii. col. 316. 

t The match between Prince George and one of the daughters of the Duke of 
York, seems to have been long in view, as ma; be presumed from mine particu- 
lars in the Earl of Carlisle's speeches, addressed lo him In 1661, at the court of 
Denmark. See " Carlisle's three Embassies," p. 399. 458. The prince's mar- 
riage with the Lad; Anne was celebrated on the 28th of Jul;, 16HS. lie shortly 
after told the king, that be grew fat since be was married. The merry monarch re- 
plied, in his usual strain of pleasantry, " that if lie would walk with him, hunt with 
hii brother, and do justice on his niece, ho would not grow fat." — A Wood's 
"Life," p. 388. 



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BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 



CLASS II. 

GREAT OFFICERS OF STATE AND OF 
THE HOUSEHOLD. 

See the Lord Chancellors and Lords Keepers in the sixth Claw 

THOMAS WRIOTHESLY, earl of Southampton, 
(lord. treasurer.) In Clarendon's "History;" Bvo. 

Thomas Wriothesly, earl of Southampton ; 4to. 
Gardiner. 

Thomas Wbiotheslv, &c. In Simons "Medals." 
p. 29. 

His portrait, together with that of his countess, by Vandyck, is 
.at Bulstrode. 

The Ear] of Southampton, like another Sully, was placed at the 
head of the Treasury after the ravage and confusion of. the civil 
war. He, with the capacity and application of that able minister, 
undertook to reduce the public accounts to regularity and order; 
and happily succeeded in that great attempt. But the king, who 
had not the least economy himself, was too apt to overlook that 
virtue in others ; and, what was still worse, was inclined to pull 
down much faster than his treasurer could build up. This excel- 
lent person, who was loyal, and yet a patriot, died too soon for the 
good of bis country. He was a man of a quick and livery concep- 
tion, prompt elocution, and invincible integrity. He was of as 
amiable and exemplary character in domestic life ; and, to say all 
in one word, was in his great office in the Treasury, what his 
friend the Lord Clarendon was in the high court of Chancery. 
Ob. 16 May, 1667. Upon his decease, the Treasury was put into 
commission, and the Duke of Albemarle was appointed first com* 



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OF ENGLAND. 139 

THOMAS OSBORNE, earl of Dauby, lord high- 
treasurer, &c. Lely p. Blooteling f. h. sh. scarce. 

Thomas Osborne, &c. W. Faithorne. 

Thomas Osbokne, duke of Leeds. R.White. 

Thomas Osborne, duke ofLeeds; in " Noble Au- 
thors" by Park. 

Sir Thomas Osborne, afterward ear! of Danby and duke of Great earl 
Leeds, succeeded Thomas, lord Clifford in the office of lord high- ElES*?' 
treasurer; which the latter resigned upon the passing of the Test 1673. 
Act." . When he entered upon his employment, the Treasury was 
totally exhausted, and the very name of a lord -treasurer was be- 
come odious: and it required the utmost stretch. of his abilities to 
restore, in some degree, the public credit, and bring the revenue 
into tolerable order. This he, by skilful management and great 
industry, effected : but he was thought to be too much in the in- 
terest of the court, to act with integrity in his high office. The Earl 
of Shaftesbury, his capital enemy, caused him to be impeached in 
parliament, with a view of extorting such secrets of state from him 1678. 
as might increase the popular odium against the court. He made 
such a defence as was expected from his extraordinary talents, and 
proved that what he had done was by the king's orders. He was 
imprisoned till the year 1684, when he was released upon bail. 

Upon the disgrace of the Earl of Danby, the Treasury was put 
in commission ; and Arthur Capel, earl of Essex, was appointed 
first commissioner. See Capel in the " Biographia." 

JOHN, earl of Radnor, &c. lord privy-seal. Knel- Promoted 
ler p. R.White eve. mezz. large h. sh. scarce. 

John, earl of Radnor; small Alo. W.N.Gardiner. 

John, lord Roberts, who commanded a regiment under the Earl 
of Essex in the civil war, was a leading man in the councils of 

• It l| well known that Sir Thomas Clifford was rewarded with the treasurer 1 ! 
ttaff, and afterward witb a peerage, for advising the king to the infamous expedient 
of shutting up the Eicheqner, of "hich he received the hint from the Earl of Sliafte*- 



, D.gilzedbyGOOglC 



140 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

the patriotic junto, and had afterward a principal hand in 
restoration. He bad much learning,* but it was mixed with the 
pedantry of the last age; and some virtues, but they were soured 
1609. and debased by a morose and splenetic temper. He was appointed 
lord-lieutenant of Ireland, in a time of confusion, when the various 
claims to the estates in that kingdom were to be adjusted. His 
parts were by no means equal to this government, at so critical t 
juncture; as he had a genius rather for starting than solving diffi- 
culties. He treated the Irish nobility with haughtiness and con- 
tempt, and was himself treated with much less ceremony than be 
expected. The king found it necessary to remove him from this 
employment ; and, soon after his return to England, appointed him 
Created president of the council, and created him earl of Radnor. He wm 
1679 * °h sene ^ to P ttZZ > e business, and retard the dispatch of it, more 
than any man that had ever been in the great offices which he en- ; 
joyed, Ob. 1685. His daughter Letitia Isabella, who was first 
married to Charles, earl of Drogheda, was afterward the vile at 
Mr, Wycherley, the famous dramatic poet-t 

HENRY, duke of Norfolk, earl-marshal, &c. Leh/p- 
Blooteling sc, sk. 

Blooteling received thirty guineas for engraving this head. 

Henry Howard, duke of Norfolk, earl-marshal, and first pen 
of the realm, was grandson to Thomas, earl of Arundel. He wa 
a man of great good-nature, and a patron of learning ; but them 
was nothing shining in his character. On the contrary, he is re- 
presented, in the " Memoirs of Gramrnont," as a man of a ilendtf 
capacity, and little or no politeness in lib manners. He was s 
considerable benefactor to the Royal Society, who assembled at 
his house in London, after the fire in 1666. He, at the motion of 
Mr. Evelyn, gave the Arundel Marbles to the university of Oxford-! 

* He mi instructed in the mathematics by Matthias Pasor, ion of George PW' 
author of Die " Leiicon to the Greek Testament." I mention this as introdutUJ 
lo the following more memorable circumstance : The same Pasor instructed tk git*' 
Dr. Pocoeke in the oriental languages. See Pasor in Wood. 

t The Countess of Drogheda went into a bookseller's shop at Tunbridge, ■■"■ 
Mr. Wycherlej happened to be, and asked for tile " Plain Dealer ;" upon wLJcli 
gentleman pointing to him, said, " Madam, there is the Plain Dealer for j« " 

t See the Dedication lo Ihe " Idea of the Perfection of Painting," translated »J 
Mr. Ereljn. 



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OF ENGLAND. 141 

lese were by far the moat precioua of the Grecian relica which 
5 grandfather possessed, and the roost valuable of their kind in 
e world. They formerly stood exposed to the air in the garden 
longing to Arundel House,* This benefaction will probably be 
numbered by the editions of the " Marmora Oxoniensia" of 
r. Prideaux, Mr. Maittaire, and Mr. Chandler, when the original 
scriptione are totally obliterated. He died the 11th of Jan. 1683, 
-id was succeeded by his son Henry, who married the Lady Mary 
(ordaunt, daughter of Henry, earl of Peterborough. It is well 
nown that this lady was divorced from the duke, and afterward 
larried to Sir John Germaine, bart. 

GREAT OFFICERS OF THE HOUSEHOLD. 

The Duke of ORMOND, lord-steward ofthehouse- Promoted 
told. Wissingp. R.Williams f. h.sh. mezz. 166 °" 

James, duke of Ormond. Knetler p. Ravenet sc. 
h. sk. 

Jacobus, dux Ormondiae. Kneller p. 8vo. This 
print is curious, as it is one of the very few engravings 
executed by George White, the mezzotinter: it is without 
kis name. 

James, duke of Ormond. J. v. Berge. 

Duke of Obmonp. Bocquet sc. In "Grammont" 
1809; 8vo. 

Jacobus, dux, marchio, et comes de Ormond. 
Loggansc, largeh.sh. This has been copied by Michael 



* The duke had ■ seat St Albury, in Surrey, where the Hjpogeum, or Suhtcr- 
'soeoiii Crollo, cut through a bill, hu been much admired. It is about a furlong 
u lenglb, and leads into a fine valley .t Bui tLii la eiceeded by the Hypogeum at 
Park Place, the seat of Mr. Conway ; where, besides several elegant works of art, 
'We is, perhaps, a greater Tariety of natural beauties, than are (o be aeeu on any 
•pot of tlie ,ii m e eitent in tbe three kingdoms. 

t Sec Gibson's " Camden," col. 184. 

J,gil zed by GOOgle 



142 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

Jacobus, dux Ormondiae. Loggansc. Svo. 

James, duke of Ormond ; in armour; oval; mezz. 

Vertue, in his manuscript, mentions a half-length mez- 
zotinto of the Duke of Ormond, by Robert White. 

There is a portrait of him, by Lely, at Amesbury, and another al 
Woburn. 

The Duke of Ormond was an excellent soldier, an accomplished 
courtier, and an able statesman ; and, what was a better character 
than all these, he was the good, the humane, and benevolent a 
He did and suffered much in the cause of Charles I. and was oik 
of those royalists whose characters were never tainted, and which 
were revered even by their enemies. Cromwell offered to restore 
his immense estate to him ; but he was a man of too nice honour to 
accept of that offer from one who, he thought, had no right to make 
it. He was a warm friend, and a placable enemy; and was uever 
known to have any enemies himself, but those who were offended at 
his virtues. He had an admirable talent at speaking; and never failed 
to convince, as he spoke only on the side of truth and equity. His 
military exploits in Ireland in the late reign, and his wise govern- 
ment of that kingdom in the present, the hardships he suffered in 
his exile, and his active loyalty to his banished sovereign, are 
amply recorded in his " Life" by Mr. Carte, in two volumes folio. 
Ob. 21, July, 1688, JM, 78. 

EDWARD, earl of Manchester, one of the chiefs of the Presby- 
terian party, was voluntarily chosen for the office of lord- chamberlain 
by the king. He indeed highly merited the honour which was con- 
ferred upon him. See the " Continuation of Lord Clarendon's Life," 
p. 47. See also the reign of Charles I. Class V1L 

HENRY JERMYN. Schiavonetti ; in "Gram- 
mont ;" from the picture at Strawberry-hill, 

Henry Jermvn, &c. W. N, Gardiner ; fol. 

Henry Jermyn ; small oval. 



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OP ENGLAND. 143 

Henht Jermyn, earl of St. Alban's ; from an original 
by Sir Peter Lely, in the possession of the late George 
£>rttmmond, esq. at Stanmore. Godfrey sc. Ato. 

Henry Jermyn, earl of St. Alban's ; in Gram- 
monCs "Memoirs;" 8vo. 

Henry Jermyn (second son to Sir Thomas Jermyn, of Ruslibroofc, 
in the county of Suffolk, lent.) was treasurer of the household to 
King Charles the First, and master of the horse to the queen. In 
the beginning of the civil war, he spared neither pains nor expense 
in obtaining arms and ammunition from foreign parts, for the royal 
service. He exposed himself to the greatest hazard in attending 
the queen into England, and landing her in safety at Burlington, 
Yorkshire, in 1642, and conducting her thence with all the power 
he could raise through the enemy's quarters, to the king at Oxford, 
For this service he was, by letters patent, bearing date at Oxford, 
Sept. 3, 19 Car. I. advanced to the dignity of a baron of the realm, 
by the title of Lord Jermyn of St. Edmundsbury, in Suffolk; with 
limitation of that honour, in want of issue of his own body lawfully 
begotton to Thomas big elder brother, and the heirs male of his 

He raised a regiment, and was wounded in the arm by a pistol- 
shot, in a skirmish previous to the first battle of Newbury, in Sep- 
tember, 1643. He afterward (in July 1644) went to France, and 
continued there till the restoration ; soon after which period, he was 
sent to conduct the queen-mother to England. Cowley and Sir 
William D'Avenant were patronised by him while he was at Paris ; 
and the former lived in bis family. 

He served King Charles the Second, while in exile, with great 
fidelity; and was employed by him in several embassies to the King 
of France, which he performed with great diligence and wisdom. 
In consideration of these services he was, by letters patent, bearing 
date at Breda, in Brabant, April 27 , 1660, created earl of St. Alban's, 
in com. Hertf. 

It has been generally thought, that he was privately married to 
Queen Henrietta Maria, but at what period their union took place, 
we are unable to ascertain. She died at Columbe, in France, Au- 
gust 31, 1669. 

On the 13th of May, 1671, he was appointed lord-chamberlain of 



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144 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

the household, which employment he held till September 11, 1674; 
and in May 1672, he was installed a knight of the Garter. Ob. 
December, 1683. 

HENRY BENNET, earl of Arlington. P.Zetyp. 
J. Houbraken sc. In the collection of Sir Thomas Heat' 
mer, hart. " Must. Head" 

Henry Bennet, earl of Arlington, lord-chamber- 
Iain of the household ; white staff; h. sh. 

Henry Bennet, &c. Thane. 

Henry Bennet, &c. mezz. small oval. A.Bloote' 
ling; J, Lloyd eve. 

Henry Bennet, earl of Arlington; collar and badge 
of the Garter. 

Henry Bennet, earl of Arlington; 8vo. 

There are portraits of him in Christ Church-Hall at I.onglcat, 
and Lord Bathurst's, at Cirencester. 
Crcut. esti Henry Bennet, earl of Arlington, secretary of state and lord- 
aiApril chamberlain to Charles II. was educated at Christ Church, in Ox- 
Made lord- ior( l, where he distinguished himself by several pieces of poetry, 
crumb. which are printed in different collections of occasional verses. In 
1S74. P " tne re 'g n °f Charles I. he was one of the under secretaries to 
George, lord Digby, secretary of state; and afterward entered a 
volunteer into the royal army, where he received many honourable 
wounds* He followed the fortunes of Charles II. with whom be 
was long a wanderer ; and was employed by him in several embas- 
sies, before and after the restoration. He bad an uncommon talent 
at raillery and ridicule, and employed these low arts to undermine 
the credit of the Lard- chancellor Clarendon ; and when his own 
credit began to decline, the same arts were returned upon himself. 
He was one of the cabinet council, notorious by the name of tit 

• The print! represent him with * large cat an hi* nose. 

DpIZHibyCoO^lc 



OF ENGLAND. 145 

labaZ, to which much of the political infamy of this reign will fop 
-per adhere. They advised the king to shut up the exchequer, and. 
tersuaded him that his interest was unconnected with that of his 
>eopIe. Ob. July 28, 1685, 2Ei. 67. 

GEORGE, duke of Albemarle, master of his ma- 
lesty's horse. F. Barlow p. Stentexch.sk. 

. George, duke of Albemarle. Bartow p. Wm. 
Clarke sc. 

Geobgius, dux Albemarle. D.Loggan adv'wum 
delin. et ccelavit, 1661 ; half length, h. sh. This is one 
of Loggan's best prints, ami the original of several 
others; it resembles the picture at the Duke of Queens- 
berry's, at Amesbury. The print is copied by Sheppard. 

George, duke of Albemarle ; a small oval f inscribed 
G. M. in Faithorne's manner. 

George Monck, duke of Albemarle. Gaywoodf. 
h. sh. There are two others 4to. and a third Svo. by the 
same hand. 

George Monck, &c. White sc. 8m 

George Monck, &c. J. Ch. (Chantry) sc. 1663; 
chaplet of laurel; 8vo. 

George Monck, &c. B.Audran. 

George Monck, &c. Bocquet sc. In" Noble Au- 
thors" by Mr. Park. 

George Monck, &c. H. R. Cook sc In Prince's 
"Worthies of Devon;" Ato. 1810. 

George Monck* &.c. W. T. Fry sc. 1816 ; from 

VOL IV. V 



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140 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

the original of Sir P. Lely, in the Town-kali, Exeter; 
in Mr. Lodge's " Illustrious Portraits." 

Georg e, duke of Albemarle, inscribed, " TheEffigm 
of the valiant and renowned;" on horseback. R.P< 
Sold by S. Lye, Cannon-street ; scarce. 

George, duke of Albemarle, Sec. Before his "Ob- 
servations on military and political Affairs" 1671 ; fol. 

George, dukeof Albemarle. R. Preeke e.vc. 1661; 
targe Ato. 

\ George Monck, &c. Before his " Funeral Sermon? 
by Seth (Ward), bishop of Sarum, 1670; 4te. 

George, late duke of Albemarle, &c. E. leDavissc. 
h.sh. . 

George Monck, &c. on horseback; Stent; h.sh. 

George, duke of Albemarle and his dutchess, 
standing hand in hand; sold by Stent ; very bad.* 

Mr. Walpole, in vol. ii. p. 179, of the second edition of bis 
"Anecdotes of Painting," mentions a capital half-length of him K 
the Countess of Montrath's, Twickenham Park: 
■ His portrait is in the gallery at Gorhambury. 

George, duke of Albemarle. R. Cooper sc. 

Appointed George Monck, duke of Albemarle, who had a very early indi- 

thi-Tone' nation to a military life, served in the Low Countries, under the 

1660. Lords Oxford and Goring. In the civil war, he at first adhered "> 

Created t ne king'; but having suffered a tedious imprisonment for fcis 

July ?, loyalty, he took the covenant, and entered into the service of tk« 

1660. ' ■ ■ ■ ■ 

• There is a print of George, prince of Denmark, with naval trophies, ci«ip^ 
and engraved by Burghers, and profiled to the Oxford verses on the death of it*' 
prince. .This anonymous portrait has' been mistaken: for the Duke of Albemarle. 



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» . OF ENGLAND. 147 

trliarnent. * He signalized himself at the battle of Dunbar, where 
'. had a principal share in that important victory. He was after. 
ard employed by Cromwell in reducing Scotland, which he did 
fee tu ally, and had the chief management of affairs in that king- 
urn. It is well known that he had the greatest hand in the rcs- 
iratioQ, and that his gallant behaviour on board the fleet, in the' ie 
■utch war, was almost without example. He is not so well known 
s an author, though in that character be was not without merit.* 
ie had talents both for peace and war ; but his capacity was more 
dapted to the field than the cabinet. His conversation and ad- 
ress were better sailed to those scenes of action to which be had 
ieen accustomed, than to the drawing-room of. Charles II. Ob. 
1 Jan. 1 669-70. See Class VII. 

GEORGE, duke, marquis, and earl of Bucking- 
ham. S.Verelstp. Becketf. h.sh.mezz. 

George Villiers, duke, marquis, and carl of 
Buckingham, &c. R. White sc. h. sh. In Guillim's 
" Heraldry ,-" folio. 

George, duke, marquis, and earl of Buckingham,: 
&c. master of the horse. Before his Works, Svo. 

George Villiers, duke of Buckingham. Boc- 
quttf. In "Noble Authors? by Mr. Park, 1806. 

George Villiers, duke of . Buckingham, a man of great wit and 
humour, and of the most whimsical caprice, was the admiration and 
the jest of the reign of Charles the Second. He was the alchy- 
mist and the philosopher ; the fiddler and the poet ; the mimic and 
the statesman. How shall I sketch the portrait of one who had 
such a variety of faces, or draw him in miniature who was of so 
great, and at the same time of so little a character ? He has left us 
a specimen of his admirable wit in his " Rehearsal" which is a crea- 
tion of his own, and had a considerable effect in reforming the stage. 
Oi. April 16, 1687, JEt. 60. t ' 

'See the" Catalogue of Hojal and Noble Authors." 

1 It ii certain, from what Lord Clarendon tells in, that the duke frequently 
felted himself with the preachers al court. The following story was told u» M.a 



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148 BIOGRAPHICAL DISTORT 

JAMES, duke of Monmouth, (master of the horse). 

Lety p. Blooteling sc. large h.sh'. 

James, duke of Monmouth, &c. Lelyp. Btoetelingf. 
oval; in armour; large as the life ; large th. taezz. 

James, duke of Monmouth. Wissingp. Vander- 
vaartf, h. sh, mezz. 

James, duke of Monmouth. Kndlcr p. Vaadrc* 
banc sc. in armour ; sh. 

Jacobus, dux de Monmouth, &c. robes of the 
Garter. Loggansc. h. sh. This is the handsomest 
print of him. 

Jam Kft, duke of Monmouth; two prints by Van Hove; 
small Svo. 

fact by Dr. Dibben, an intimate friend of Mr. Prior, and the translator of hi) Se- 
cular Ode into elegant Latin. A yoong divine of great modesty, who preached 
before the king, on Psalm emu. vene 13, " I am fearfully and wonderfully 
made," wai the innocent occasion of much mirth in the chapel royal. Tha> 
young man, who it supposed to have been in a sweat, more from apprehension thin 
the warmth of the season, happened, before be named his text, to wipe his faccwidi 
one of hit hands, on which was a new glove, and with the die ofit unluckily blacked 
himself. The Duke of Buckingham, upon comparing the words of the teitwitk 
the figure of the preacher, was instantly seized with a Jit of laughter, in which be 
was followed by Sir Henry Beimel and several other courtiers; nor wu tbe kiaf 
himself, who thoroughly enjoyed a jest «f this kind, able to keep his ooontenutte. 
The Reverend Mr. Gosling, of Canterbury, upon reading thia anecdote, made tat 
following otiservaiion, which I >b all give the readtr in that gendeman'a own words: 
" 1 have heard my father (who was of the dispel royal in King Charles the Se- 
cond's time) tell this story of a Dr. Besbury, without the circumstance of the glon, 
which teems needless from another story of him. While he was in waiting si 
Windsor, he observed a person paaa him in the street, and turn back to look at tin 
to often, that at last he pretty roughly asked what be meant by it- He very 
civilly asked pardon; but said he was a painter ; that he had then in hand a picture 
of Nathan reproving David, and thought that the doctor had the moat reproving 
face be had ever met with. Thia occasioned some harsher language, to which lbs 
artist replied, he had gut as much as be desired, and took his leave." The anecdote 
of the preacher, as corrected by Mr. Gosling, seems. to be the more authentic j bit 
he certainty was chaplain to King William and Queen Anne, as appears from an 
epitaph in St. Giles's chinch, at Rending, 



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V OF E^GLA;ND. ; 149 

James, duke of Monmouth. P. Stent; sold by 
Overton. 

James, duke of MoDmouth and Buccleugh. Nic. 
Visscker ; large h. sh. 

James, duke of Monmouth. P. Schenckf. in ar- 
mour. 

J a mes, duke of Monmouth ; in armour ; collar of 
the Garter. 

James, duke of Monmouth; a head-piece; in the 
quarto edition of Waller's Works. 

Jacques Scot, due de Monmouth. V. Werff.p. 
(delin.) Picart sc. direx. 1724 ; 4to. 

JAME6,duke of Monmouth; mezz. oval; Lely; P. V. , 

Somer ; 4to. scarce. 

James, duke of Monmouth, on horseback; Netscher 
and Wyck p. W. Baillie sc. 

Jacobus, dux de Monmouth, &c. on horseback; a 
cypher, probably for Francis Barlow.* 

Mr. Pennant, in his " Tour in Scotland, "+ informs us, that there 
is a large spirited picture of the Duke of Monmouth en horseback, 
and another in armour at Datkeith-house. The same author ob- 
serves, that all his pictures have a handsome likeness of his father; 
At this house is a portrait of Lucy Walters, his mother, of whom 
Mr. Bull has an authentic drawing. 

James, duke of Monmouth, was a natural son of Charles II. by Created 
Mrs. Lucy Walters,! daughter of Richard Walters, of Haverford-- **' 
West, in the county of Pembroke. Courage and good nature, 15 Cu. II. 



* There U ■ poor print of him, "•old bj Overton," ah. ThTs is not worth the 
collector's notice. 
t F. 61. * Sbe wu sometime- culled Mr,. Barlo" . 



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150 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

youth sad beauty, ambition and pliancy of temper, contributed to 
render him the favourite of his father, the minion of the people^ 
and the tool of faction. Accumulated wealth and honour, univer- 
sal popularity and royal favour, though more than he could veil 
bear, did not satisfy him. He knew not how to be happy without 
sovereignty, while he enjoyed all its advantages, without an; of 
its cares. He even pretended that he had a right to the succes- 
sion ;• and it is certain that the king for some time connived at his 
ambition, as he thought his faction a proper counter-balance to that 
of the Duke of York.f The Earl of Shaftesbury, who managed 
him as he thought fit, first formed the project of raising him to the 
throne. See the next reign. J 



GREAT OFFICERS OF SCOTLAND. 

WILLIAM, duke of Queensberry. Kneller p. Van- 
drebanc sc. large ah. 

Created ' William, earl of Queensberry, was made lord justice-general and 
3 Ffb lord high-treasurer of Scotland, by Charles II. and appointed lord 
1685-4. high-commissioner of that kingdom in the beginning of the neit 
reign. This nobleman and the Earl of Aberdeen had the manage- 
ment of the affairs of Scotland in 1681, after the departure of the 
Duke of York. They have been both justly censured for (heir 
rigorous and oppressive administration. Great numbers were out- 
lawed by the Earl of Queensberry, only for conversing with sucb 
as refused the Scottish Test. These conscientious persons were 

• The pretended secret Hiiloiy of Charles II. md Lucy Walters, was pubEsbed, 
nnder borrowed names, in the " Perplased Prince ;" written in the manna of » 
no. el, and dedicated to William, lord Russel. The king is there laid 10 time btcn 
certainly married to her. This book, which is but a mean performance, had a pal 
influence on the populace. 

t Wclwood, p. 169. 

J The Duke of Monmouth had a sister, Mary, who espoused William Sanfield, 
esq. of Lucan, in Ireland, $ by whom be had an only daughter, named CharlrtK, 
who was married to Mr. Vesey, an Irish gentleman. Mary espoused, to her seco»i 
husband, William Fanshawe, esq. master of the requests to Charles II. Sbe did 
in April, 1693, leaving issue by him one son and three daughters. See Sandfwd'i 
" Genealogical History," p. 645, last edit. 

$ Elder brother to Patrick, styled earl of Lucan. 



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OP ENGLAND. 151 

tnded with the Dame of rebels. He Tell into disgrace booh after 
i accession of James, because he refused to change his religion. 



JOANNES BAP. COLBERT, &c. Baro de Seig- 
Jlay. Nantemt.se. 1660. There are various other 
•ints of him. The best that I remember to have seen is 
\at engraved by Ant. Masson ; sh. 

Joannes Bap, Colbert. Joe. Lubin sc. 

Joannes Bap. Colbert. C.leBrun; G.Edelinck; 
irge sheet. 

John Baptist Colbert, privy-counsellor and superintendent, of the 
nances, secretary, and minister of state to Lewis XIV. and one of 
ie ablest ■ politicians that any age or country has produced, was 
am of Scottish parents in France. He instituted, established, 
nd directed manufactures. He was perfectly acquainted with all 
ie springs of opulence, and knew how to convey them into their 
toper channels. Trade received life, vigour, and stability under 
is auspices ; and the French marine would have become forroida- 
>te, if the jealousy of Louvoia had not turned aside his master's 
mbition to conquests at land. The canal of Languedoc, begun 
nd carried on under his direction, was itself a work that would 
i»vc immortalized a Roman. He died at Paris, ou the 6th of Sep- 
etnber, 1683. His library of books, printed and manuscript, is 
aid to have been superior to any private collection that ever was 
aade.* 

He is mentioned here, as being enrolled by the Scots in the 
plendid list of their illustrious persons. 

THOMAS, first lord Clifford of Chudleigh ; from 
'he original of Lely, in the collection of the Right Hon. 

* Culbert had a brother, whom lie introduced into the management of affairs, 
'•id an acquaintance with the great world. The German! and the English fuunti, 
° their detriment, if not their disgrace, that he was a very artful and able arabas- 
•dor- He hat been frequently confounded with the peat Colbert. That he was 
' different person will appear from his character in Muni. Wicquefort'a '" Rights,, 
fa'ilegei, and Office of Ambassadors," translated by Digbj.t / 

t See p. 411. 



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162 DIOGRAPHTCAL HISTORY 

Lord Clifford. W. Hott sc. In Lodge's "Illustrious 
Personages of Great Britain •" folio, quarto, and octavo. 

Thomas, lord Clifford, of Chudleigh, was die eldest of the three 
sons of Hugh Clifford, of Ugbrook, in Devonshire, a gentleman 
who had been intrusted with the command of a regiment of foot 
for the king in the beginning of the rebellion, by Mary, daughter 
of Sir Oeorge Chudleigh, of Ashton, in the same county, baronet.— 
He was born on the 1st of August, 1630, and completed his educa- 
tion at Exeter College, in Oxford, where he became a gentleman 
commoner on the 25th of May, 1647 ; and '* was accounted," sa;s 
Wood, " fay his contemporaries there a young man of a very un- 
settled head, or of a roving shattered brain." The fervid and san- 
guine disposition which drew on him this censure from dull and 
plodding judgments, enabled him to reap the fruits of study without 
labour, and he left the university in a state of proficiency which 
astonished those who had uttered it. He travelled for some time 
on the continent, and on his return, was entered of the Middle 
Temple, and studied the law with an assiduity which leaves little 
room to doubt that he then intended to adopt it as a profession. 
The ancient affection, however, of his native county to his names 
and family, opened new prospects to him. The borough of Totness 
elected him to serve in the parliament, by which Charles the Se- 
cond was restored, and rechose him for the first which was called 
by that prince. He was now in his proper sphere of action. The 
freedom of debate was suited to his natural impatience of control, 
and his ambition was soothed by splendid visions of preferment 
He possessed all the requisites to establish parliamentary reputa- 
tion, and exercised them with a freedom and boldness at that time 
seldom practised. He commenced his career by opposing the 
measures of government; grew distinguished and formidable; mad* 
terms with the king's ministers; and became a most steady advocate 
for the royal prerogatives. 

■ He now privatery engaged himself, in concert with some other 
members of the House of Commons, to use his most strenuous 
endeavours to augment, by all practicable means, the authority and 
revenue of the crown ; and it has been said, that Lord Clarendon's 
opposition to those measures, was the principal cause of that great 
man's fall. Henry Bennet, earl of Arlington, and secretary of 

state, was his first eminent political' friend and patron, and his 
strict intimacy with that minister, together with a strong rumour 



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OF ENGLAND. 153 

that he had been secretly reconciled to the church of Rome about 
the time of the restoration, introduced him to the favour, and 
shortly after to the confidence, of the Duke of York. In compli- 
ment to that prince, and perhaps to relieve and solace a spirit of 
peculiar ardency, he attended the duke in the great sea-fight with 
the Dutch of the 3d of June, 1665, and became so interested in 
the tremendous novelties which he that day witnessed, that he 
chose to remain with the fleet after the command had devolved, in 
the duke's absence, on the Earl of Sandwich, with whom be sailed, 
in the beginning of the following August, oa the expedition to 
Bergen, in Norway. 

On the 26th of October, 1666, he was appointed comptroller of 
the household, and on the 5th of the following December, sworn of 
the privy council; on the 13th of June, 1668, the office of treasurer 
of the household was conferred on him ; and, presently after, the 
Treasury being put into commission on the death of the Earl of 
Southampton, he was named one of the lords commissioners. He 
became now, perhaps, the king's most confidential adviser, and 
this was presently after in a manner publicly acknowledged by his 
reception into that cabinet council, which, from the initial letters of 
the names of the five who composed it, obtained the denomination 
of" the Cabal." The whole designs of which were, the establish- 
ment of absolute monarchy) and the restoration of the Romish 
religion. 

Charles the Second, who thirsted for absolute monarchy chiefly 
for the sake of personal ease, determined to ensure his future get- 
vices by giving him the strongest proof of his favour and gratitude.' 
On the 2Qth j>f April, 1672, created him baron Clifford, of Chad-" 
leigh, in the county of Devon, to which honour was added, a grant' 
of considerable estates, chiefly in Somersetshire ; and, on the 28th 
of the following November, he was appointed lord high -treasurer. 

In the preceding year the king, who had become the voluntary 
vassal of Louis XIV. resolved to gratify that prince by breaking 
the league, known by the title of the triple alliance, which had been 
formed against France in the year 1667, between England, Sweden, 
and the United Provinces, and to make war on the latter of those 
powers. His coffers were exhausted ; the parliament not then 
sitting ; and no reasonable hope to be entertained from assembling 
it, of obtaining a grant of money for the prosecution of a measure 
so unpopular.^ — In this dilemma, Charles is said to have declared' 
that he would give the staff of high-treasurer to any of his miniat- 



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154 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

ten who could contrive a feasible plan to raise 1 ,500,000/. without 
an application to parliament. " The next day," as the story goes, 
" Lord Ashley (afterward the notorious earl of Shaftesbury) told 
Clifford that there was a way to do this, but that it was dangerous, 
and might, in its consequences, inflame both parliament and people. 
Clifford, impatient to know the secret, plied the Lord Ashley with 
visits, and having drunk him to a proper height, led him insensibly 
to the subject of the king's indigence. Lord Ashley, warm and 
unguarded, dropped the important secret of shutting up the Exche- 
quer. Clifford took the hint ; left the Lord Ashley as soon as he 
possibly could ; went the same night to Whitehall ; and, attending 
till the king rose, demanded the white staff. The king renewed 
his promise iftbe money could be found, and then Clifford disclosed 
the secret, and was accordingly made lord-treasurer," The whole 
of this, however, seems to be fabulous. The project of shutting 
up, as it was called, the Exchequer, by which the bankers, who 
had supplied Charles's necessities with money, borrowed of olhers 
on the security of the revenues, were disabled from fulfilling their 
engagements, was devised and recommended by Ashley alone. 

Lord Clifford held his high appointment for little more than six 
months ; about the time that he obtained it, Charles, at his sugges- 
tion, published a declaration for universal liberty of conscience and 
worship, and for the suspension of the penal laws against dissenters 
of all descriptions. It was presently perceived that this measure 
was contrived for the encouragement and benefit of the Roman 
Catholics ; the House of Commons took it up with great warmth; 
voted it to be illegal ; and not only endeavoured, by two several 
addresses, to persuade the king to revoke it, but broke out into 
open hostility against the Papists, and brought in a bill for a new 
test, peculiarly framed to disqualify them for all public employ- 
ments. The peers received it with more moderation, but Clifford 
defended it in that house with a haughtiness and violence of ei- 
pression, which provoked the utmost resentment and disgust. It 
was on that occasion that he applied the quoted phrase, " mon- 
strum horrendum ingens," to the vote of the Commons, and re- 
proached that branch of the legislature in terms of anger and con- 
tempt, nfrver, perhaps, before or since applied to it by a speaker in 
the upper house. The Lords, however, sanctioned the king's de- 
claration by their vote, but the majority was small, and no less 
than thirty signed a protest against it. The chancellor, Shaftes- 
bury, spoke and voted against it, and the king, to wbom Clifford 



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OF ENGLAND. 155 

hart not only previously submitted the plan of his speech, but by 
whom some additions had been made to it, intimidated by the re- 
sentment which it had produced, and the artifices of the treasurer's 
enemies, determined to abandon at once his measure, and bis 
minister. 

The appointment of Sir Thomas Osborn, afterward duke of 
Leeds to that important post, was the result; Clifford retired, 
overwhelmed with chagrin, to the country. Some remarkable par- 
ticulars of his latter days have very lately appeared in a publication 
of the diary of his intimate friend, John Evelyn, who tells us, that 
his resignation " grieved him to the heart, and at last broke it." 
Mr. Evelyn adds, that when he took leave of this nobleman, on his 
quitting London for ever, Lord Clifford " wrung him by the hand," 
and said, " Good bye — 1 shall never see thee more — do not expect 
it — I will never see this place, this city or court, again;" and 
couples with these speeches, which evidently refer rather to future 
life than death, a very idle rumour of the day, that he perished soon 
after by his own hand. 

He died, as we are informed by Prince, in his "Worthies of 
Devon," of a fit of the stone, at his house of Ugbrpok, in that 
county, in September, 1673; and his friend, Mr. Evelyn, from 
whom alone we have any view of his private character, makes some, 
atonement for the blemish so carelessly cast on bis memory, by 
recording that he was " a valiant uncorrupt gentleman ; ambitious, 
not covetous ; generous, passionate, and a most sincere constant 
friend." 



CLASS III. 
ENGLISH PEERS. 

DUKES. 

WILLIAM SEYMOUR, duke of Somerset. Letyp. 
1671. Vertuesc. 1724; large h. sh. 

William, duke of Somerset, was son of Henry, lord Beauchamp, 
by Mary, daughter of Arthur, lord Capel. He succeeded his grand- 
D.gilzed by GOOglC 



150 BIOGRAPHICAL IflSTORT 

father William, who, on the 25th of April, 1660, ni restored to 
the title of duke of Somerset, forfeited by the attainder of £■ 
great -grandfather, in the reign of Edward VI. 04, 1 67 1 . 

CHRISTOPHER, duke of Albemarle, (soq-«fc 
George). Sherwin sc. sh. See the next reign, 

c«Mrt WILLIAM CAVENDISH, duke of Newcasffc 

.1664-5. 'Diepenbeke del. Ciouvet sc. See the reign of CuARxsaft 

Class III. 



The Duke of RICHMOND and LENOX ; «*** 
black holding his hat and feather. H. Gascar p. wk$f 
length, mezz. s -| 

The Duke of Richmond. W. W\ using p. J.Beclafijft 
with a greyhound; h. sh. mezz. . . 

The Duke of Richmond. Wissing p. R.WilliammL 
robes of the Garter; 4to. mezz. ^?. 

The Duke of Richmond. DuBroynp. R. To% 
son exc. h. sh. mezz. 

The Duke of Richmond. Kneller p. R.Whitei 
h. sh. mezz. All these prints represent him young?' 

The Duke of Richmond, &c. Le Davis. 

The Duke of Richmond. F.Jollain. 

The Duke of Richmond ; whole length. B, Lens. 

At DdkeM -house, the seat of the Duke of Buccleugh, in Scot- 
land, are portraits of the duke and his dutchess- in one piece. 



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OF ENGLAND. 157 

Charles Lenox, first duke of Richmond, was the only son of 
Louise Renee de Penencourt, of Queroualle, in France,* by King 
Charles the Second, who being present at his baptism, gave him 

* This lady coming into England, in the year 1670, with (he Dutchess of 
Orleans, the king's sitter, bis majesi y waj so taken with her beauty and deport- 
ment, that he created her dutches! of Portsmouth, counteu of Farneham, and 
baroness of PetenGeld, all in the coontj of Southampton, tu enjoy during her life, 
bj letters patent, dated at Westminster, August 19, 1673. And likewise bj h'n 
intercession with the then French king, Louis XIV. the territory of Aubigny, in 
France, which, by the death of Charles Stuart, siith duke of Richmond and Lenox, 
reverted to thai crown, was given to her grace, by grant, dated at St. Germatns 
en I -aye, in the month of December, 16T3, and thirty-first year of hii reign, during 
Iter life ; the remainder to such of the King of Great Britain's natural sons by her, 
as he shall name ; under Ike same limitation as the grant by Charles VII. of 
France, anno 1422, to John Stuart, ancestor to the aforesaid Duke of Richmond. 
Aubigny is a town in Berry, in France, situate on the river Nere, given (accord- 
ing to Pere Daniel) to John Stuart, the third lord Damley of the name of John, 
on March S4, J-1S4, to whom the county and earldom of Eureni was also granted 
in 14*6, and who was kilted at the battle of Herrings, on February 18, 14*8-9. 

The French king, by his grant dated at Versailles, in the month of January, 
1684, in the forty-first year of bis reign, recileih, " That the territory of Aubigny 
upon Nere, ins the province of Kerry, having been given, in the year 1433, by 
Charles VII. to John Stuart, In consideration of the great and commendable 
services by him done in the wars ; and by default or hein male, the same having 
reverted to the crown, anno 1671, on the death of the Duke of Richmond, he. io 
regard to the King of Great Britain, had, by his letters patent, dated in the month 
of December, 1673, granted to the Lady Louise Renee de Pcnencourt de Querou- 
alle, dutthess of Portsmouth, the said territory of Aubigny, with all rights to the 
same belonging, for her life ; remainder to such of the natural male children as she 
shall have by the King of Great Britain, in tail-male, by the said king to be 
named : remainder In Ihe crown of France. And whereas, the said King of Great 
Britain, had appointed Charles Lenos, duke of Richmond, his natural son, master 
of the borne, and knight of the Garter, to succeed the said Dutchess of Portsmouth 
in the said inheritance ; he, the said King of France, being willing to annex to 
the said Inheritance aproper title, and such as should be agreeable to the illustrious 
birth of the said Duke of Richmond : and at the same time to confer honour on 
the said Dutchess of Portsmouth, whose progenitor! always held a considerable 
rank in the province of Britanny, as well in consideration of their birth, services in 
the army, as alliance to ancient families, and otherwise; and also considering the 
great extent of the said territories, consisting of the town of Aubigny, two consi- 
derable castles two parishes and fiefs, extending to the court and parliament at 
Paris; being likewise mistress of the waters, forests, fairs, markets, and all places 
ia the said territories ; therefore he unites, creates, and erects the said town, terri- 
tory, caitellany and castle of Aubigny, fiefs and lands, Etc. into a dutcliy and 
rjeerdom of France, with all pre-eminence! and prerogatives thereunto appertaining ; 
to be enjoyed by the said Lady Louise Range Peneucourt de Queroualle, dutches* 
of Portsmouth, during her life ;. and aflat her decease, by Ihe said Duke of Rich- 
mond, and Ihe heirs male of his body, in nanw, title, and dignity of dukes of 



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158 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

the surname of Lenox, and bit own Christian name Charles. 
was born July 29, 1672, and being of great hopes, was, in the thud 
year of his age, created, by his royal father, baron of SetringtoB, 
in the county of York, earl of March (a title derived from the 
Marches in Wales), and duke of Richmond, in Yorkshire, by letters 
patent, bearing date at Westminster, August 9, 1675. 

And his majesty considering, with what lustre and glory the 
house of Lenox had shone in former times, and that by the death 
of Charles Stuart, duke of Richmond and Lenox, the dignity of 
the Duke of Lenox was immerged in the crown ; therefore, thai 
the honour might be again revived, his majesty bestowed the 
estate of Lenox on his son, the aforesaid Charles, duke of Rich- 
mond : and by letters patent, passed in Scotland, on September 9, 
created him duke of Lenox, earl of Darnley, and baron Methoea, 
of Torbolton, and to the heirs mate of his body. 

His grace was elected, April 7, 1681, a knight companion of (Jie 
most noble order of the Garter, and installed at Windsor on the 
20tb of the same month. At that time, and formerly, as pictures 
shew, the knights of the Garter wore the blue riband round tbe 
neck, with the George appendant on the breast: but the duke's 
mother having, sometime after his installation, introduced him to 
the king, with his riband over his right shoulder, and the George 
appendant on the left side, his majesty was so pleased with the 
conceit, that he commanded all the knights companions of the 
order to wear it the same way. The Duke of Richmond was 
made master of tbe horse to the king, on the removal of the Duke 
of Monmouth; which office, during his minority, was executed by 
three commissioners, Henry Guy, Theophilus Oglethorpe, and 
Charles Adderly, esqrs. but on the accession of King James to the 
throne, his mother having promoted the bill of exclusion, his grace 
was removed from that honourable employment. November 14, 
1693, he took his seat in the House of Peers. 

In the reign of King William, he served in Flanders, and wis 
aid-de-camp to his majesty. He was also one of the lords of the 
bed-chamber to King George I. and departing this life, at his seat 
at Goodwood, in Sussex, May 27, 1723, was buried in King Henrj 
the Seventh's chapel, in Westminster- abbey, but afterward removed 
to Chichester cathedral. 

Anbigny, and peers of France ; with all jurisdiction, rights, honours, authority, **■ 
belonging lo the said dignity of peers and dukes, and sovereignty of the siaf 

dulchyj doing homage Id the crown of France." 



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OF ENGLAND. 159 

The Dutchess of Portsmouth was aroused by the Earl of Shaftes- 
iry, who well knew her influence over Charles, with the visionary 
■pes of a parliamentary settlement of the crown upon the duke 
x son. His predecessor, in the dukedom of Richmond, was 
oarles Stuart, who married a celebrated lady of his own name, 
.lh whom the king was deeply in love, lie died in his embassy 

Denmark, the 12th of Dec. 1672. 

The Duke of Richmond married, in January, 1692-3, Anne, 
idow of Henry, son of John, lord Belasyse, of Worlaby, by whom 
; had one .son, Charles, second duke of Richmond, Lenox, and' 
ubigoy; and two daughters, Lady Louise, born Dec. 24, 1694, 
larried to James, third earl of Berkeley, and Lady Anne, married 
> William-Anne, second earl of Albemarle. 

HENRY, duke of Grafton. T. Hawker p. Becketf. 
'>kole length; large h. sh. mezz. 

Henry, duke of Grafton. Knellerp. Becketf. 
arge Ato. 

The Duke of Grafton. J. Becketf. a ship at sea; 
k.sh. mezz. 

The Duke of Grafton. E. Cooper exc. small Ato. 
mezz. 

Henry Fitz-Roy, second natural son of Charles the Second, by 
Barbara Villiers, dutchess of Cleveland, bom Sept. 20, 1663, being 
if a brave and martial spirit, addicted himself first to the experience 
of maritime affairs, having been in several naval expeditions with 
Sir John Bury, knt. vice-admiral of England : he was, by letters 
patent, bearing date August 16, 1672, created baron of Sudbury, 
viscount Ipswich, and earl of Euston, all in the county of Suffolk ; 
and September 11, 1675, created duke of Grafton, in the county 
of Northampton. August 31, 1680, he was elected a knight of the 
most noble order of the Garter ; but being then at sea, with Sir 
John Bury, he was installed at Windsor by his proxy, Sir Edward 
Villiers, knt. afterward earl of Jersey, Sept. 30, following. 

December 15, 1681, he was chosen by the corporation of the 
Trinity House, to be one of their elder brothers ; and on the 30th 



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1G0 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

of the name month, constituted colonel of the first regiment of foot- 
guards, which was given, in 1688, to the Earl of Lichfield, but 
restored to him in the same year by the Prince of Orange. In 168?, 
he was appointed vice-admiral of England; and in 1684, was sworn 
recorder of St. Edmund sbury, in Suffolk. Tn 1685 appointed lord- 
lieutenant and custos rotulorum of that county, and also by patent, 
remembrancer in the First-fruits office, ranger of Whittlebury 
forest in Northamptonshire, and gamekeeper at Newmarket. 

At the coronation of James II. he performed the office of lord 
high-constable of England. And on the landing of the Duke of 
Monmouth in the West, 1686, he commanded a part of King James's 
forces, and behaved with great gallantry in the action of Philips 
Norton Lane, in Somersetshire, narrowly escaping with his life.— 
In 1687, the Duke of Somerset having declined conducting Ferdi- 
nand D'Ada, archbishop of Amasia, Pope Innocent XL's mir.cio, to 
his public audience, he was prevailed on by the king to perform it; 
and accordingly, on the 3d of July that year, he solemnly conducted 
him to Windsor, attended by Sir Charles Cotter el, master of the 
ceremonies, in one of his majesty's coaches. The same year 
(being then vice-admiral of England), he had the command of a 
squadron of his majesty's ships of war, to receive Mary Sophia, 
queen of Pedro II. king of Portugal, in Holland, and conduct her 
to Lisbon. He afterward sailed for Tunis, where he arrived, 
Oct. 16, 1687; and having brought the corsairs of that place to 
amity, he returned to England in March, 1688, and waiting on tk 
king was graciously received. 

On the landing of the Prince of Orange, he was one of the Pro- 
testant peers, then in London, who, with the archbishops of Canter- 
bury and York, Sec. signed a petition to King James, " That in (he 
deep sense of the miseries of a war, &c. they did think themselves 
bound in conscience, and out of the duty they owe to God, their 
holy religion, Ac. most humbly to offer to his majesty, ,that in their 
opinions, the only visible way to preserve his majesty and his king- 
dom, would be tie calling of a parliament, regular and free in all 
respects, &c." The Jesuits were so enraged at this petition, that 
they published a paper with this title, Borne Reflections vpon <*> 
humble Petition to the King, of the Lords, viho subscribed tie ami 
presented November 17, 1688. 

On King James's arrival with his army at Salisbury, November 19, 
the Duke of Grafton, with the Lord Churchill (afterward duke of 
Marlborough), were the first that went over to the Prince of Orange. 



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OF ENGLAND. 161 

And such confidence had his highness in his grace's good dispo- 
sition to him, that when King James had the first time withdrawn 
himself from Whitehall, he dispatched the Duke of Grafton from 
his camp at Henley, to go and take possession of Tilbary Fort, with 
his regiment of foot-guards. But after the meeting of the Conven- 
tion, when it came to be debated in the House of Peers, Whether the 
throne being vacant, it ovght to he jilled up by a regent, or a king, 
the duke was one of the forty-nine, that voted for a regent. How- 
ever, his grace, with the Duke of Ormond, the Dukes of Southamp- 
ton and Northumberland, soon after acknowledged the Prince and 
Princess of Orange for king and queen. And at .their coronation he 
attended, and bore the king's orb. 

In 1690, he embarked with the Earl of Marlborough for Ireland, 
who arrived before the harbour of Cork, Sept. 21, and two days 
after, the greatest part of the land-forces went on shore, headed by 
the Duke of Grafton,' who coming the next day within a mile of the 
town of Cork, began a formal siege. And a considerable breach 
being made, the grenadiers were ordered to storm the town, headed 
by his grace, and some resolute volunteers. But as he was leading 
them on to the assault, on September 28, he received a wound with 
a shot, which broke, two of his ribs, whereof he died, at Cork, on 
October 9, following ; and his corpse was brought to England, and 
buried at Euston, in Suffolk. 

The Duke of Grafton married the Lady Isabella, only daughter, 
and at length heir, to Henry Bennet, earl of Arlington, viscount 
Tbetford, &c. secretary of state, and of the privy council, knight of 
the most noble order of the Garter, and lord-chamberlain of the 
household to Charles II. by the Lady Isabella of Nassau, his wife, 
one of the daughters of Lewis of Nassau, lord of Beaverwaert, and 
count of Nassau, and sister to Henry of Nassau, seignior de Auver- 
querque, master of the horse to William HI. and father' of Henry 
earl of Grantham ; and by her had Charles, his only child, second 
dnke of Grafton^ born at Arlington-house, in St. James's Park ; 
who, in right of his mother, became earl of Arlington, viscount 
Theubrd, and baron Arlington; her father being created baron 
Arlington, of Arlington, in the county of Middlesex, March 14," 
1663, and viscount Thetfora in the county-of Norfolk, and esrl of 
Arlington, April 22, 1672, with limitation to the heirs of his body 
lawfully begotten. - - 



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162 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

GEORGE FITZROY, earl (afterward duke) of 
Northumberland, &c. H. Gascar p.* A. Tooker ere. 
large h.sh. tnezz. 

The Duke of Nohthumberland. Witting p. Wil- 
liams/. 4to. mezz. 

Cmttd George Fitzroy, duke of Northumberland, was another natural 
tw" 1 ' * on of Charles II. by Barbara, dutchess of Cleveland. In 1683, 
he was elected knight of the Garter. la 1701, be succeeded Henry, 
duke of Norfolk, as constable of Windsor Castle, and lord lieute- 
nant of the county of Surrey. In the reign of Anne, he was con- 
stituted lord* lieutenant of Berkshire, lieutenant-general of the 
queen's armies, and one of the lords of her privy council. He 
married, in 1685, Catharine, daughter of Robert Wheatley, of 
Bracknol, Berks, esq. and relict of Thomas Lucy, esq. of Cbarlecote, 
in the county of Warwick. He died without issue. 

HENRY CAVENDISH, duke of Newcastle, on 
Horseback; with his elder brother Charles, viscount 
Mansfield. A. V. Diepenbeke. Lisebetius sc. In the 
Duke of Newcastle's book of " Horsemanship ;" sheet. 

Henrt Cavendish, duke of Newcastle, 1676. 
W.Richardson; 1811; oval; hat and feather. 

Henry Cavendish, duke of Newcastle, was the only surviving sod 
of the celebrated William, marquis of Newcastle, who, by his steady 
adherence and loyalty to Charles the First, suffered a lose of no 
less a sum than 733,579/. the only return for which was the honour 
of being made a duke at the restoration of Charles the Second. 
His grace dying in 1676, at the advanced age of eighty-four, was 
succeeded in his honours by this nobleman ; who, though less con- 
spicuous than his father in the political hemisphere, yet held many 
dignified offices and posts of state. He married Frances, daughter 
of William, second son of Robert Pierpoi nt, earl of Kingston, which 
lady brought him four sons ; three of which died young ; and the 

• It it observable thai all the prints after Gucsr'i paintings in very nucomnRm. 



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HENKY CAVENDISH, 



of ^ACwrtzzjJle-. S67&. 



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OF ENGLAND. 163 

surviving son, Henry, after his marriage with Elizabeth, daughter 
and heir of Joceline Percy, earl ef Northumberland, called himself 
Percy, but died in the lifetime of his father, anno 1680. The 
Duke of Newcastle had also five daughters; who, upon his decease, 
in 1691, proved his coheirs: at which time, the titles of Cavendish 
of BoJsover, viscount Mansfield, eart of Ogle, and earl, marquis, 
and duke of Newcastle became extinct. The title having termi- 
nated in the name of Cavendish, was next revived in that of Holies, 
hi the person of John Holies, earl of Clare; who, having married 
Margaret, third daughter and coheir of Henry Cavendish, the last 
duke of Newcastle, was raised to that dignity in 1694; but having 
no male issue, this honour expired again upon his decease, July 15, 
anno 1711. Whereupon Thomas Pelham Holies, earl of Clare 
(who had been so created in 1714), was, in 1715, advanced to the 
dukedom of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, with limitation, in default of 
issue male, to hia brother Henry, and hia issue male; both of these, 
however, deceasing, the said title ©nee more became extinct, on his 
grace's death in 1768. But having, in 1756, been created duke of 
Newcastle under Line, in Staffordshire, with an entail, on failure of 
issue male of his own body, to Henry Clinton, earl of Lincoln, and 
his issue male, by Catherine Pelham his wife, niece to him the said 
duke, this last- mentioned title, upon his death, descended accord- 
ing to the above limitation, and is now vested in die noble family 
of Clinton. 



HENRY, duke of Beaufort. Wissing p. R.WiU 
Hams J', h.sh. mczz. 

Henry, duke of Beaufort; in armour; anonymous; 
(Vandi/ckJ; (Faithorne). This has been mistaken for 
Edward, marquis of Worcester, by Granger. 

Henry, duke of Beaufort. Knellerp, R, White sc. 
Large h.sh. 

A print from this plate, with some alteration in the arms, &o. 
wss sold at Paris, in the reign of Anne, for the head of Lord 
Bolingbroke. ' The name of Desrochers, the engraver, is inscribed 
on the print. 



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164 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

Henry Somerset was bod of Edward, marquis of Worcester, who 

had a considerable share in the transaction a of the law reign; and 
was*, in his father's lifetime created earl of Glamorgan by Charles 1.* 
He was by Charles II. July 30, 1660, constituted lord-lieutenant 
of Gloucestershire ; and. in 1672, lord- president of the council in 
the principality of Wales; and lord lieutenant of the several coun- 
ties of Anglesey, Brecon, Cardigan, Caennarthen, Glamorgan, and 
Radnor, in South Wales ; and of Carnarvon, Denbigh, Merioneth, 
Montgomery, Flint, and Pembroke, in North Wales. He was also, 
on August 22, appointed lord 'lieu tenant of the county and city of 
Bristol ; and on August 27, the same year, sworn of his majesty's 
privy-council : having on June 3, the same year, been installed 
one of the knights of the Garter. And having been eminentlyser- 
viceable to that king (as is expressed in the patent) since his most 
happy restoration ; in consideration thereof, and of his most noble 
descent from King Edward the Third, by John Beaufort, eldest son 
of John of Gaunt, duke of Lancaster, by Catherine Swinford, his 
third wife, he was, by letters patent, dated on December 2, in 1682, 
the thirty-fourth year of his reign, advanced to the title of duke of 
Beaufort, with remainder to the heirs male of his body. 

At the funeral of Charles II. he was one of the supporters to 
George, prince of Denmark, chief mourner ; and, by James II. was 
made lord -president of Wales, and also lord- lieutenant of all 
the above-mentioned counties ; and at his coronation, carried the 
queen's crown. In June 1685, he was made colonel of the eleventh 
regiment of foot, then first raised, the command of which he re- 
signed that year tu his eldest surviving son, Charles, marquis of 
Worcester. — He exerted himself against the Duke of Monmouth, 
in 1685; and, in 1688, endeavoured to secure Bristol against the 
adherents of the Prince of Orange : upon whose elevation to the 
throne, his grace refusing to take the oaths, lived in retirement till 
his death, Jan. 21 , 1699, in the 70th year of his age. F 
ried in Beaufort chapel at Windsor, and a very elegant 
erected over him, the inscription of which is inserted in Pote' 
tory of Windsor," p. 381 , and Ashmole's " Berkshire," vol, ii 
having had by Mary his wife, eldest daughter of Arthur, lord Ca- 
pel, widow of Henry, lord Beau champ, five sons, and four daughters; 
his dutchess died in the eighty-fifth year of her age, Jan. 7, 1714, 
and is buried at Badmington. 

" See (he arnclc of EdwihdSou£r5Et, marquis of Worcester, in the Interreg- 
num, Class III. ■ ■ 



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3d by Google 



31* 3gkt Jfii*? Sharks &<irluf!3>trhy,i*rdJlnr>lty W .ftrtnyr-,<,f.K»cii»> 
ZAoroniif "fttkhm,,7Uaii£nl -£nrri^AehuJi,. r Sur-nell/&afsiH ,nnd -Caiy.Jerd Jn-ufoian' 
rf tht Cotinluis .faOnfynt of Jst/>aut/:r,itnd Gfujter,and tiu S'fy and Qawty of 
^Jkr, ehtLmbtrhwofChtjttrty-ce.AAiniraltfliu.afvrciaU &. UB h.-J Jori 
»f.MM,,<w.dft!t AtttVc. 

, y GoogIe 



OF ENGLAND. 



A MARQUIS. 



- HENRY SOMERSET, marquis of Worcester. 
'JBiboteling sc._ 

: ' -"Henry Somerset, marquis and earl of Worcester; 
robes of the Garter; h.sh. 

Henry, marquis of Worcester, (inscribed Earle). 
P. Stent; oval. 

.Henry Somebset, &c. W. Richardson. 

He was afterward created duke of Beaufort. See the above 

article. 



EARLS. 
CHARLES, earl of Derby. A. Blootelingf. h.sh. 



The Earl of Derby. Lely p. R.Tompsonexc. h.sh. 

mezz. 

Charles, earl of Derby; in an oval. W.Rich- 



Charles Stanley, earl of Derby; in "Noble 
Authors," by Park. 

Charles Stanley was sou of James, earl of Derby, by his coun- Created 
teas, grand-daughter to the renowned William, prince of Orange, 1W6 ' 
and not inferior to her great ancestor in spirit and bravery* In 
1 642, when his father joined the royal army with a large supply of 

" Thii was the heroine that defended La lh am -house in the ciiil w*r. 



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166 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

men and money, he committed to him the lieutenancy of the conn- 
ties of Lancaster and Cheater, with an injunction to pat the king's 
commission of array in execution ; which he performed with reso- 
lution and dispatch, and then entered upon hostilities. This occa- 
sioned a proclamation to be issued out against him by the parlia- 
ment, " for murdering, kilting, and destroying."* It is obserrabie, 
that this was the first proclamation of the kind, after the com- 
mencement of the civil war.f He married Dorothea Helena Rwpa, a 
German lady ; and dying the 21st of Dec. 1672, was succeeded by 
his son, William ; who, having no surviving issue male, the title 
descended to his brother, James, the twenty-second earl of Derby, 
and the tenth of his family. 



JOSCELINE, earl of Northumberland. Lelifp. 
Browne; h. sh. taezz. 

His portrait, by Sir Peter Lely, is at Petworth. 

C rental Joscelino Percy, the last earl of Northumberland of that name, 
1J47. h a ^ ; B3ue by his countess, Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas, earl of 
Southampton, and lord high- treasurer of England, a daughter, who 
was named Elisabeth, after her mother. This great heiress was 
married, first, to Henry Cavendish, earl of Ogle, son and heir to 
Henry, duke of Newcastle, by whom she had no child : she wai 
next claimed in marriage by Thomas Thy one, esq. of Long] eat; 
who was murdered before consummation : and, lastly, was married 
to Charles Seymour, duke of Somerset. Josceline, her father, died 
at Turin, the 21st of May, 1670. After his decease, the earldom 
of Northumberland was claimed by James Percy, a trunk-maker, 
who pretended to be the next heir-male, and commenced a suit 

* He was then Lord Strange. 

t Charles., eighth earl of Derby, wai nothing behind his father in loyally, venturirg 
his lift [o restore King Chattel the Second. In August, 1659, oiiSir George Booth'i 
riling iu Cheshire, ha appeared at the head of diiers gentlemen in Lancashire; bat 
being defeated, he was taken, bthre the ead of tint month, in the habit of a serving 
man, and brought prisoner to London, in order lo be brought to trial ; but General 
Monk soon after declaring for the king he »ai set at liberty, and in couiideratiaa 
of his own loyalty and thai oDim family, he was constituted lord lieu tenant oftht 
cunnly of Lancashire, and July 30, 1660, wai also constituted lord-lieutenant of the 
county uf Chester: 



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OF ENGLAND. lt>7 

it law in pursuance of his claim; bat k vu adjudged to be ill 
founded. * He was father of Anthony Percy, who was lord mayor 
of Dublin in tha year 1700. 

The Right Honourable the Lord Burghley, earl 
of Exeter. P. Ldy p. R. Tompson exc. fondling a 
greyhound; h. sk. mezz. 

The original is in the grand collection at Burghley-house, near 
Stamford. 

John, lord Burghley, fifth earl of Exeter, married Anne, only Created, 
daughter of William, earl of Devonshire, and sister to William, duke M "? *• 
ef Devonshire, also widow of Charles, lord Rich, son and heir of 
Charles, earl of Warwick, a lady celebrated in one of the first 
poems of Mr. Prior, to whom her lord was patron ; it is from 
Burghley he dates his ingenious epistle to Fleetwood Stiephard, esq. 
The Earl of Exeter had by her John, his son and heir; William 
Cecil, of Snape, in the county of York, esq. several times mem- 
ber for Stamford, as was his brother Charles after him ; and Ed- 
ward, who all three died unmarried. The latter was at the siege 
of Barcelona, A. D. 1706, and died there after raising the siege. 
Also four daughters, Christian, Anne, and Frances, who died young; 
and Elizabeth, married to Charles Boyle, earl of Orrery in Ireland, 
and baron of Marston, in England. 

This noble earl had a learned education, and an excellent genius, 
for the improvement whereof he travelled twice to Rome, and the 
polite parts of Europe ; whereby no person was better adapted to 
adorn the court, or fitter for the administration of public affairs. 
Bat his lordship not taking the oaths at the revolution in 1688-9, 
he lived for the most part in the country, always in great honour 
and reputation; affable and pleasing to his friends, bountiful to the 
poor, and a constant aisertorof the religion and liberties of his 
country. His lady was a faithful companion in his travels, and was 
present when he died, on August 29, 1700, in his last return from 
Rome, in the village of Issy, near Paris; she survived him three 
years, and was buried near him, under a very magnificent and ele- 
gant monument, brought among other exquisite works from Rome, 

* See "The humble Petition of Jaisel Percy, Cousin and next Heir-Male of 
Inceline, Sec." ful. 



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1G8 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

end erected in the church of St. Martin's . Stamford ; wkrewi is ibis 
inscription, which farther shews how greatly (bey excelled in what- 
ever was commendable. 

H. S. E. 

Johamres Cecil, baro de Borghley, Ezonise comes, wjagiii 
Barleii abnepos haudquaquam degener. Egrcgram cum indolent 
optimiii moribuB optimus artibus excoluit. Hnmanioribns Eleris 
bene inatructus, peregre phu vice simplici, profectos est. et ab ex- 
cultis Europe regionibus, inultam antiquitatum IragBaram, necnmi 
et rernm civiliam scientiam reportaviL Cum nemo forte nelhu 
vel aulum ornare, velcurare rcspublicas posset; maluit tames otnun 
et secesaum. 

Itaque ruri suovixit, elegant 
studiis oblectatus, amicis comii 
etecclesite Anglican® fortis ser 
et perigiinntionum, imo fere et 
Annam ex prsnohili domo de C 
filiam, corporis, forma et animi 
decere possent, dotibus iusigne 
Ffielix conjuge fcelix et prole ! 
beatiorcm, mortal i tat is hand im 
artis opera curiosus lustrabat, I: 
■ime fieri potuit, sibi et charis 
omnium consoiti. 

1 
Obiit ille, j 

Aug. 29, 1700. 



JOHN EGERTON, 

W.-Ctaret p. large Ato. mezz. There is another 
portrait of him, which belongs to the reign of Wil- 
liam III. 

John Egerton, second earl of Bridge water, was sworn of the 
privy council on Feb. 13, 1666 ; and though he complied not with 
all the counsels of those times, yet he continued a privy-counsellor 
the remaining part of King Charles the Second's reign, as appears 
by his being again sworn in 1679, when his majesty dissolved the 
old privy council, and constituted a new one ; which circumstance 



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^%s^Pt^. THOMAS E6ISTOK ^fcQ^/tw,^ 
IOHJ ^W«W RARI, a^BBlDeWATK», 



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OF ENGLAND. 169 

presents us with some idea of his lordship's character as a patriot.; 
for if he had not been a popular person, and one that stood up for 
the liberties of the people, they would not so heartily have 
acquiesced. in his re- appointment, nor would the king have nomi- 
nated him as one, had he not known it would be acceptable to the 
public. In 1667, he was appointed to examine into the application 
of the several sums of money granted to his majesty for main- 
taining of the war against the Dutch ; and was also, in that and 
the succeeding reign, lord-lieutenant and custos rotulorum of Buck- 
inghamshire, Lancashire, Northamptonshire, and Hertfordshire, 
as also high-steward of the university of Oxford. Sir Henry 
Chauncey, who was well acquainted with his lordship, has given 
us this memorial of him in his " History of Hertfordshire." 

He was a learned man, delighted much in his library, and allowed 
free access to all who had any concerns with him. His piety, 
devotion in all acts of religion, and firmness to the established 
church of England, were very exemplary ; and he had all other 
accomplishments of virtue and goodness. He was very temperate 
in eating and drinking ; but remarkable for hospitality to his neigh- 
bours, charity to the poor, and liberality to strangers. He was 
complaisant in company, spoke sparingly, but always very perti- 
nently ; was true to his word, faithful to his friend, loyal to his 
prince, wary in council, strict in his justice, and punctual in all his 
actions. He lies buried by his lady in the chancel of Gaddesden, 
(near his mansion-house of Ashruge) in the county of Hertford, 
where, on a monument, is the following inscription : 

" Here lies interred . ■ ' ' ■ ■ 

John, earl of Bridgwater, viscount Brackley, baron of Ellesmere, 
and one of the lords of the privy council, and lieutenant of the 
counties of Bucks and Hertford, and custos rotulorum of both, to 
King Charles II. and King James II. who desired no other memo- 
rial of him but only this : 

" That having (in the 1 9th year of his age) married the Lady Eli- 
zabeth Cavendish, daughter to the then earl, since marquis, and 
after that duke of Newcastle, he did enjoy {almost 22 years) all 
the happiness that a man could receive in the sweet society of the 
best of wives, till it pleased God in the 44th year of his age to 
change his great felicity into as great, misery,. by depriving him of 
his truly loving and entirely beloved wife, who was all his worldly 
bliss ; after which time humbly submitting to, and waiting, on th<a 



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170 BIOGRAPHIC 

will and pleasure of the Alroigr 
23 years, + months, and 12 dayi 
October, in the year of out Lord 
own age, yielded up hie soul infc 
fare it. 

" Job xii 
** Jhmgk he day m», yi 

EDWARD RICH, earl 
Wissingp, Smith/. (1684) 

Edward Rich, earl ol 
ardson. 

Created Edward Rich was son of Rober 
16%.' **cond wife, daughter of Edward, 
Charlotte, daughter of Sir Thorn 
Denbigh, bart. and by her had 
Henry, who succeeded him in 17! 
the time of his death, which hap] 
chamber to George I. As he died 
wick and Holland, with their app 
sen of Cope Rich, esq. The lattei 
Son to the Earl of Holland, who w 
' The widow of the Earl of Warn 
brated Joseph Addison, who died 
ton, on the 17th of July, 1719. 

PHILIP STANHOPE, 
small oval. Wortidge sc, 12 

Philip, earl of Chesterf 
Memoires of Grammont ;" 8 

Created : Philip, the second earl of Chest 
XMS - his Iirb r resided with his mother, in 

* Thii print m done from the original b 
polo's edition of the " Memoires de Grama 
tord Harrington has the picture. 



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(RightBonb t EDWARD RICH EARL y WARWICK&MOZIAND. 

?ub?Iti?tS' t iJ>N. iy Wltieh&dfon Gt/H* St 'leieefier Square, 

GooqIc 



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OF ENGLAND. 171 

with William III. when prince of Orange. He promoted the re- 
storation of Charles II. who deservedly esteemed him, and in 1662, 
appointed him lord-chamberlain to the queen. In 1680, he was 
sworn of the privy council. His other civil and military employ- 
ments, are enumerated in Collins s " Peerage." He lived tempe- 
rately, and died calmly, at upwards of eighty years of age, on the 
23th of January, 1713. He was grandfather to Philip Dormer, 
earl of Chesterfield. The character of this great man, which reflects 
a lustre upon his family, naturally interests the reader in the per- 
sonal history of every one that has any relation to it. 

His lordiship had three wives; 1st, Lady Anne Percy, eldest 
daughter of Algernon, earl of Northumberland, by whom he had 
one son, Algernon, that died in his infancy ; and she dying in 1654, 
his lordship married, 2dly, Lady Elizabeth Butler, daughter to 
James, duke of Ormond, by whom (she dying in July 1665) he had 
issue one son, Henry, that likewise died an infant; and a daughter 
Elizabeth, born in 1663, married to John Lyon, fourth earl of 
Strathmore, in Scotland; 3dly, his lordship wedded Lady Eliza- 
beth Dormer, eldest daughter and coheir to Charles, earl of Caer- 
narvon, by whom he had two sons and two daughters. Her ladyship 
died in 1679. The sons were, 1st, Philip, the third earl of Chester- 
field; 2nd, Charles, who changed his surname to Wotton, derived 
from his grandmother (enjoying the estate of the Wotton s, by gift of 
his half-uncle, Charles Kirkhoven, lord Wotton, and earl of Bello- 
mont), and married Jane, daughter and coheir of Gilbert Thacker, 
of Repton Priory, in the county of Derby, but deceased without 
issue, Feb. 6, 1703-4. His lady was secondly wedded to Thomas 
Stanhope, of Elvaston, esq. but bad no issue by him. 

Lady Mary^ eldest daughter, born in 1 664, and died in January, 
1703, was the first wife 4o Thomas Coke, esq. of Melburne, in the 
county of Derby. 

Lady Catherine, born in 16?5, was married to Godfrey Clark, of 
Chilcot, in the county of Derby, esq. She died Dec. 3, 172&, 

CHARLES BLOUNT, earl of Newport. P. v. So- 
flier; V. Green ; whole length ; mezz. 

Charles, son of Montjoy, earl of Newport, succeeded his elder 
brother George, but died soon after, in 1676, unmarried. The title 

became extinct by the death of bis brother Henry, in 1681. 



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172 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

JOHN, earl of Rochester. Lefyp. R. White jr. 
1661 ; sk. 

- John, earl of Rochester, born April, 1648, died 
the 26th of July, 1680. R. White sc. 8w. Before his 
" Life," by Dr. Burnet ; 8vo. 

John, earl of Rochester. Vandergucht sc.* 

John, earl of Rochester. Thos. Hill pmxit. J. Smith 
fcc'U. Altered from Sir John Crisp. 

John, earl of Rochester. W. N. Gardiner sc. 

John, earl of Rochester. Harding. 

John, earl of Rochester. Bocquet; m "Gram' 
mont" Bvo. 1809. 

John Wilmott, earl of Rochester; in "Noble 
Authors, by Mr. Park. 

John Wilmott, earl of Rochester; crowning his 
monbcy with a wreath ; from the picture mentioned in 
the note ; in Harding's "Biographical Mirrour." 

£*"!* John, ton of Henry Wilmot, earl of Rochester, held the first 
1631. ' rank of the men of wit and pleasure of his age ; and he will ever be 
remembered for the extreme licentiousness'of Kis maimers and his 
writings. He had an elegant person, an easy address, add a quick- 
ness of understanding and invention almost peculiar to himself;. 
and, what may now perhaps seem improbable, he had natural* mo- 
desty. He entered, with blushes in his face, into the fashionable 
vices of this reign ; but he well knew that even these vices would 
recommend him, and only be considered as so many graces added 
to his character. His strong and lively parts quickly enabled him 
to go fan beyond other men in his irregularities ; and he soon be- 
came one of the most daring profligates of bis age^ He was in a 

" There it ■ portrait of him at Warwick Caatle, crowning liis monkey with ■ 



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OF FNGLAND. 173 

x>ritinual state of intoxication for several years together ;* and the 
ting, who admired his sallies of wit and humour, was more de- 
ighted with his company when he was drunk, than with any other 
man's when he was sober. He was ever engaged in some amour 
or other, and frequently with women of the lowest order, and the 
vilest prostitutes of the town. He would sometimes, upon these 
occasions, appear as a beggar, or a porter ; and he as well knew 
how to assume the character, as the dress of either. After he had 
run the giddy round of his pleasures, his eyes were open to con- 
viction, and he became the Christian and the penitent. His re- 
pentance began with remorse and horror, but ended with hope and 
consolation. See Class IX. 

EDWARD, lord MOUNTAGU, earl of Sandwich. 

Lcly p. Blooteling sc. collar of the Garter ; h.sk. 

Edward, lord Mountagd, earl of Sandwich. Vertue 
sc. large 8vo. copied from the next above. 

Edward Montagu, &c. E.Bocquet sc. In"Noble 
Autkors? by Mr. Park. 

Earl of Sandwich. W. N. Gardiner sc. Ato. 

Edward, earl of Sandwich ; leaning on a cannon ; 
mezz. Dunkarton. 

There is a portrait of him by Lely, at Chiswick. 

The Earl of Sandwich, who shone in his public character as the Creiied 
general, the admiral, and the statesman, was in private, among bis ?!&_**■ 
friends, the open, the candid, and benevolent man. He served 
Oliver, whom he regarded as his sovereign, with the same fidelity 
as he served Charles II. ; but he could not transfer his allegiance to 
Richard, who be knew was born for a much humbler station than 
that of governor of a kingdom. He commanded the fleet that 
brought over the king at the restoration, and was his proxy when 
he married the infanta. His counsels did honour to the cabinet, 
which he never disgraced but once; and that was by advising the 
Dutch war, in which he losthis life. In the battle of Southwold 

* f Life," by Ilunicl, p. it. 



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174 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

Bay, after he had by liis conduct rescued a great part of the 'fleet 
from the most imminent danger, aad given at the aame time the 
most astonishing proofs of his bravery, his ship was surrounded 
with flames. He thereupon leaped into the sea, where he unfor- 
tunately perished, on the 28th at May, 1672. Several of his letters 
and negotiations are in print. Mr. Evelyn informs us, that he some- 
times amused himself with engraving.* 

. Some have been of opinion, that this valiant Earl of Sandwich 
couM not -easily have avoided being taken, had he gone into the 
hug-boat; asd that he supposed his being carried, as it were in 
triumph, iato Holland, might be a lessening to his own or his coun- 
try's honour. — When he saw Sir Joseph Jordan (who might have 
relieved him) sail past him, he declared to those about him, that, 
if they were not relieved, they must fight it out to. the last man; 
and some have imagined, that after such a declaration, he thought 
himself engaged to be the last man himself. . 

Whatever his reason was for sacrificing his life, he was so far 
from seeming desirous to part with it any sooner than his honour 
or his duty oblige'd him, that he used his utmost endeavours to save 
the shin ; but when the fire bad taken hold of her to such a degree 
that no hopes remained of saving her, he ordered his first captain, 
Sir Richard Haddock, and the rest of the officers, and even his own 
servants, to use their best endeavours to save themselves, and to 
take no care of him; so that he remained in the ship alone. 

Gerard Brandt (a Dutchman), whose partiality often came shim 
beyond the truth in favour of his own countrymen, acknowledges, 
in his life of De Ruyter, that the squadron of Van Ghent entering 
into the action, several raen of war fell upon the earl; that, however, 
he continued to maintain himself, and give the last proofs of an un- 
fortunate valour till noon, when a fire-ship took hold of bis ship. — 
" Such (says Brandt) was the end of this earl, who was vice-admiral 
of England, valiant, intelligent, prudent, civil, obliging in his words 
and deeds ; who had performed great services to his king, not only 
in war, but also in affairs of state and in his embassies." 

John, duke of Buckingham, who was present in this action, then 
a declared friend to the Duke of York, and never of thai party which 
.the earl was supposed to favour, during the whole course of bis life, 
writes of him in these words : " Yet the enemy had no success to 
boast of, except the burning our Royal James ; which, having oa 

" " Scnlptun," tliiru eait.'p. is*. 



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OF ENGLAND; 175 

booed h&r not only a thousand of our best men, but the Earl of 
Sandwich himself, vice-admiral of England, was enough almost to 
style it a victory on their side ; since his merit, as to sea affairs, 
was most extraordinary in all kinds." 

Bishop Parker, who was as zealously of the Duke of York's party, 
writes thus in bis History of his Own Times : " Sandwich having 
sadly shattered seven of their ships, and beat off three tire-ships, 
at length, being overpowered with numbers, fell a sacrifice for his 
country. A gentleman adorned with all the virtues of Alcibiades, 
and untainted hy any of his vices; of high birth, capable of any- 
business, full of wisdom, a great commander at sea and land, and 
also Learned and eloquent, affable, liberal, and magnificent." 

It was supposed by many, but unjustly, that the Duke of York 
did not support him as- lie might have done towards the beginning 
of the action ; and agreed by all, that Sir Joseph Jordan, the earl's 
vice-admiral, might hare disengaged him. Nevertheless, the loss 
of the earl occasioned great reflections on the duke ; and, in the 
parliament which met at Westminster in October, 1680, when the 
exclusion-bill was in debate, some members, actuated by party rage, 
openly charged him in the House of Commons with the loss of die 
Earl of Sandwich. 

EDWARD, lord MONTAGU, viscount Hinch- 
ingbrook, baron of St. Neot's, earl of Sandwich. 
Lelyp, Blooteli>ig.sc. half length ; h. ah. This print 
has been mistaken for the portrait of the first earl, whom 
it resembles. 

Edward MoStagu, Stc. a circle; mezz. P.Lety; 
rare. 

Edward, second earl of Sandwich) son of the former, succeeded 
his father in his honours and. estate. He died in February, 1688-9, 
in the prime of life. He married Anne, fourth daughter of Richard 
Boyle, earl of Burlington, by whom he had two sons and a daugh- 
ter, who survived him* 

There is a print, inscribed, "Edvardo Montague, 
Conte di Sandwich," &c. but it is totally unlike both the 
father and the son. 



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176 BIOGRAPHICAL BISTORT 

ARTHUR, earl of Essex. Lely p, Latterelf. 4fo. 
mezz. ■ 

Le Compte d'EssEx. Lely p. B.Picart sc.dir. 

Arthur, earl of Essex, murdered July the 13th, 
1 683. Savage sc. In a large half sheet, with seven otkert, 

Arthur, earl of Essex. V. Hove, to an account, of 
his murder; 1690. 

Created Arthur Capel, earl of Essex, was son of Arthur, lord Capel, who 
tfiAi 1 "' 1 ' wa * beheaded. He was a roan of resolution and ability, and gained 
great reputation by asserting the honour of the British flag, when 
he was sent to Denmark. His spirited behaviour on this occasion 
recommended him greatly to the king, who, on his return, made 
him a privy -counsel lor, and appointed him lord-lieutenant of Ire- 
land. He acted with singular prudence and integrity in the 
government of a country which had not perfectly recovered its 
stability, after the shocks and convulsions of a civil war, and where 
petty factions and jarring interests continually called for the 
exertion of his abilities. He was particularly careful to exculpate 
his character from false accusations, saying, that he " would rather 
suffer himself to be made a pack-horse, than bear other men's 
faults."* He was afterward one of the leading members of the 
House of Lords ; and was, upon the disgrace of the Lord- treasurer 
Danby, of whom he was an avowed opponent, appointed one of 
the new privy council, and first commissioner of the Treasury. 
About this time, the nation was as much intoxicated with faction, 
as it had been with loyalty at the restoration; and he was named 
as one of the accomplices in the Meal-Tub Plot. Upon this he 
threw up his place in disgust, and sided with the Duke of Mon- 
mouth and the Earl of Shaftesbury, though he was one of the prin- 
cipal persons who had contributed to their disgrace. He was after- 
ward accused as one of the conspirators in the Rye-House Plot, 
and committed to the Tower. He was found there not long after, 
with his throat cut iu the most horrid manner. As he had been as 
advocate for suicide, and was subject to the spleen ,f it was sup- 
posed by some that he had laid violent hands upon himself: others, 

• See hit " Lcltera," p. 345. 1 Bprnct. 

I 

D,gil zed by GOOgle 



OF ENGLAND. 177 

with less probability, supposed that he was murdered by his own 
servant; and others, with least of all, that he was killed by an 
assassin sent by the Duke of York, who, together with the king, 
was seen at the Tower the fame morning on which the murder was 
perpetrated. Ob. 13 July,1683.* 

Bishop Burnet recites, that a party of horse was sent to bring him 
up from his seat in Hertfordshire, where he had been for some time, 
and seemed so little apprehensive of danger, that his lady did not 
imagine he had any concern on his mind. He was offered to be 
conveyed away, but he would not stir. His tenderness for Lord 
Russell was the cause of this ; thinking his absconding might incline 
the jury to believe the evidence the more. ' 

Sir Henry Chauncy, in his History of Hertfordshire, says, he was 
a person of an agreeable stature, slender in body, adorned with a 
comely countenance, miied with gravity and sweetness, and was 
easy of access ; his mind was sedate, but his discourses were gene- 
rally free and pleasant, and his demeanour very complaisant ; his 
promises were teal and sincere ; his reprimands smart and inge- 
nious, having a quick apprehension, good elocution, sound judg- 
ment, great courage, and resolution unalterable ; he was always 
wary and circumspect in council, where he endeavoured to obstruct 
all arbitrary power, and the increase of the Popish interest, having 
a particular regard for the established religion of his country; he 
was very temperate in his diet, strict in his justice, tender of his 
honour, and constant to his friend ; he delighted much in bis library, 
which enabled him to speak on all occasions with great applause, 

* See more of him in his " Letters," with his life prefixed, published in a qnarto 
ruin tut, 1770. These "Letters" are written in the plain and clear style of an expert 
and able man of business. It should be observed, thai (be above character is coin, 
rident with that given by Bishop Burnet, and should be admitted with caution, 
particular!} in what relates to his death. Hit biographer endeavours to invalidate 
the charge of suicide brought against him, telling us, that, " he was a nobleman of 
most virtuous and religious principles, and of the greatest Bedateness of mind."t 
Be says, that •' it was then, and bath since been thought, that he was murdered by 
Paul Bomency, a French servant, who attended hini."J He adds, that Bomeney 
was strongly inspected to have been prompted to Ibis act by the Earl of Suther- 
land and Lord Feversham, and by the contrivance and direction of the Duke : that 
Bomeney, in consequence of this suspicion, was dismissed from the Earl's family, 
and '• thereupon cherished and entertained by the court, and made one of the life- 
guards.-} 

t " Life," p. iiii. notes. - } Ibid. p. si, § Ibid. p. iv. notes, ■ 

W>t. iv. 2 a 



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178 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

and would spend his vacant tours in the Tiering of records, and 
learning of the mathematics. These were his diversions, together 
with recreating himself in his fine gardens and pleasant groves at 
Caahiobury, which were of hli own plantation. 

The Earl of Essex married Elizabeth, daughter of Algernon Percy, 
earl of Northumberland ; which lady was interred in the vault of 
the family iu Watford church, near her husband, Feb. 5, 1717-18. 
They bad issue six sons, Algernon, Charles, Arthur, Henry, Alger- 
non, and Arthur ; also two daughters, Elisabeth and Asm : whereof 
only the last Algernon and Anne lived to maturity. The slid Anne 
was married to Charles Howard, third earl of Carlisle; sbediedhis 
widow, Oct. 14, 1752, aged 78, and was buried at Watford. 

ROBERT SPENCER, earl of Sunderland ; from 
an original picture by Carlo Marratti; in the collection 
of Earl Spencer. In the "Royal and Noble Authors," 
by Park. 

Robert, the only son and heir of Henry, first earl of Sunderland, 
by Dorothy Sidney, the Sacharitta of Waller, possessed a manly 
disposition and ready parts. Having travelled abroad, he was ap- 
pointed ambassador extraordinary to the court of Spain, and after- 
ward created secretary of state along with Sir William Temple. 
Soon after the accession of James the Second, he was made presi- 
dent of the council, and one of the commissioners for ecclesiastical 
affairs, in which office he is said to have made a step to popery, 
without any previous instructions ; so that the change looked like 
that of a man who, having no religion, took up one rather to serve a 
turn, than because he was truly a convert. He was afterward is 
great favour with William III, and gained such an ascendancy over 
the king, that he brought him to agree to some things, which few 
expected he would have yielded to ; but falling subsequently into 
some discredit at court, for his supposed opposition to a standing 
army, he resigned, and retired to his seat at Althorpe. Ob. 1702. 
See " Royal and Noble Authors," by Park. 

ARTHUR ANNESLEY, earl of Anglesey. Bocauet 
sc. From a drawing in the collection of R. Bull, Esq. 
in." Royal and Noble Authors," by Mr. Park. 



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OF ENGLAND. W9 

Arthur Anneslet, earl of Anglesey ; a small oval. 
Thane txc. 

Arthur Anneslet, earl of Anglesey. Harding 
sc. Svo. 

Arthur Aimesley, was, in 1661, created by Charles II. an English 
peer, by the titles of Baron Annesley, and Earl of Anglesey. He 
was remarkable for bis loyalty to that prince, to whom be strictly 
adhered during the time of bis exile ; and upon all occasion! en- 
deavoured to promote his interest at the hazard of his own life -and 
fortune.; wherefore the honours he obtained from his majesty after 
the restoration, it may be presumed, were duly merited by his ser- 
vices.* He was treasurer of the navy, a commissioner for settling 
the Irish affairs, lord privy-ieaJ, and might, we are informed, have ' 
been prims minister, if he bad not declined it to avoid envy. As 
he declined no other power, under no kind of government, this anec- 
dote seems suspicious, and we. should much question, whether any 
man declined being' prime minister for that reason. 

This nobleman is famons for a controversy with James Tucfaet, 
earl of Castlehaven ; but drawing on another with the Duke of 
Oroiond, he was disgraced ; though the author of his life, in the 
Biogruphia Britain: it- a, ascribes the cause of his fall to a remon- 
strance which he presented to the king; wherein he took too much 
liberty with his majesty, and greater with the religion of the Duke 
of York. 

He is mentioned by Walpole, in the " Noble Authors," as having 
made various publications, and is imagined to have digested Whit- 
lock's Memoirs. He passed the latter part of his time in retire- . 
mens ; and died at bis house in Drttry4ane, in 1636, just as some 
thought he would have been appointed lord- chancellor to King 
James II. 

By Elizabeth his wife, daughter and coheir of Sir James Altbam, 
of the county of Hertford, knight, he had surviving five sons : 
James Altham, who was created an Irish peer, by the title of Baron 

* While a private young man ha <nl engager! on the aide of Charles I. whose 
party he quitted for that of the parliament. Wood aajs, he took both the covenant 
and engagement ^ bnt the latter la contradicted in the Biographia Britannica. 
Certain, however, it is, lliat during the protectorate of Cromwell, lie was out trusted 
bj Ihe rump or the army. ' 



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180 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

Allham, with limitation of that honour to his younger brothers, 
Richard, Arthur, and Charles, anno 1680. Also six daughters, 
whereof Dorothy married Richard, earl of Tyrone; Elizabeth, to 
Alexander M'Donnel, second son to the Earl of Antrim; Frances, 
first to William Wyndharo, of Felbrigge, esquire; and secondly, 
John Thompson, lord Haversham; Fhiljppa, first to Charles, lord 
JUohun ; and secondly, Thomas Coward, esquire, seijeant at law ; 
Anne to Baker, esquire ; and Bridget, who died young. 

CHARLES, earl of Carlisle. Faithornef. Svo. 

C h arles, earl of Carlisle ; in Guiltim's "Heraldry;' 
' Blooteling. 

Cre»ipii Charles Howard, earl of Carlisle, had a considerable share in 
April 10, the Restoration ; and was, in his capacity of a public minister, welt 
qualified to do honour to the king his master, and himself. In 
1663, he was sent ambassador to the czar of Muscovy, to recover 
the privileges of the Russian company. He met with no success 
in this embassy ; but, on the contrary, was treated with disregard, 
and even indignity, which he resented with a proper spirit. He 
afterward went in quality of ambassador to Sweden and Denmark, 
to cultivate the alliance with these kingdoms. There is an account 
of the three embassies in print, with the earl's portrait prefixed. 
This book contains many curious remarks upon the countries 
through which he passed.* He was afterwards appointed governor 
of Jamaica. He died, according to Heylin, in 1684; according to 
others, in 1686. 

He was interred in the minster of the cathedral at York; where, 
on a monumental pillar of white marble, under his effigies, is the 
following inscription : 

" Near this place is interred 

Charles Howard, Earl of Carlisle, 

Viscount Morpeth, Baron D acres of Gillesland, 

Lord -lieutenant of Cumberland and Westmorland, 

Vice-Admiral of the coasts of Northumberland, 

Cumberland, Bishoprick of Durham, town and 

County of Newcastle, and maritime parts adjacent, 

• It ia reprinted in Harris'* " Voyages." 



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OF ENGLAND. 181 

Governor of Jamaica, Privy-counsellor 

To King Charles the Second, and his Ambassador 

Extraordinary to the Czar of Muscovy, 

And the Kings of Sweden and Denmark, 

In the years MDCLXIII and MDCLXIV; 

Whose effigies is placed at the top of this monument. 

He was not more distinguished by the 

Nobility and antiquity of his family, 

Than he was by the sweetness and affability 

Ufa natural charming temper, 

Which being improved by the peculiar 

Ornament of solid greatness, 

Courage, Justice, generosity, and a public spirit, 

Made him a great bossing 

To the age and nation wherein he lived. 

In business he was sagacious and diligent, 

And in war circumspect, steady, and intrepid. 

In council, wise and penetrating. 

And though his character may secure him 

A place in the annals of fame, 

Yet the filial piety of a daughter* 

May be allowed to dedicate 

This monumental pillar to his memory, 

Obiit xxiv. Feb. 1684, JEtat. 56." 

His lordship married Anne, daughter to Edward, lord Howard, 

of Escrick, who, surviving him, died in December 1696, having 

had three sons, Edward, who succeeded as second Earl of Carlisle, 

Frederick Christian, who was horn at Copenhagen, in Denmark, 

Nov. 5, 1664; and being slain at the siege of Luxemburgh, was 

buried in Westminster-abbey ; and Charles, who died young : also 

three daughters, Lady Mary, who died Oct. 27, 1708, and was 

buried in York Minster, married to Sir John Fenwick, of Wellington, 

in the county of Northumberland, bart. ; Lady Anne, to Sir Richard 

Graham, of Netherby, in the county of Cumberland, bart. afterward 

Viscount Preston, of the kingdom of Scotland ; and Catherine, who 

was buried in Westminster-abbey Oct. 11, 1684, unmarried. 

"WILLIAM, earl of Craven; in armour; long wig; 
half length. In Guillim's " Heraldry? fol. 

• Lady M»iy Fenwick. 



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132 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 



Created The Earl of Craven was co!om?l of the Coldstream regiment of 

Harchi' - - - 

1664. 



Marchie, foot-guards, and one of the privy-council t«>Charle» II. He is said 



to have been secretly married to the queen of Bohemia, the king's 
aunt. It is certain that he was much in her favour and confidence. 
The Duke of Albemarle and this lord continued in London, and 
prevented much mischief during the pestilence. 

Having been a great sufferer in the royal cause. King Charles 
the Second, on his restoration, taking iato consideration his losses 
iu his service, created him an earl, and in 1670, on the death of 
Oeorge, duke of Albemarle, constituted him colonel of the regi- 
ment of foot-guards, called the Coldstream regiment; likewise lord- 
lieutenant of the county of Middlesex, and of the borongh of South- 
wark; and June 30, 1660, castes rotuloram of Berkshire. He 
was also high-steward of the university of Cambridge, one of the 
governors of the Charter-bouse, and one of the lords proprietors 
of the province of Carolina in North America. 

The Earl of Craven continued in the esteem of King Charles 11. 
during the whole course of his reign ; and Elisabeth, Queen of Bo- 
hemia, the lung's aunt, committed all her affairs to his lordship. 
When King James II. came to the crown, his lordship attended at 
his coronation, April 23, 1685, and for come time was in his favour, 
and was swom of bis privy -council ; but at length having intimation, 
that the king woulil be pleased with the resignation of bis com- 
mission, he said, " If they took away his regiment, they had as 
good take away his life, since he had nothing else to divert himself 
with." Upon which he was allowed to keep the regiment. 

But on King William's accession to the crown, the earl's said 
regiment was bestowed on General Thomas Tahnash ; and John 
Holies, earl of Clare, afterward Duke of Newcastle, was consti- 
tuted lord-lieutenant of the county of Middlesex. However, his 
lordship, to the time of his death, though divested of every office 
dependant on the crown, was ever ready to serve the public, and 
was particularly famous for giving directions in extinguishing fires 
in the city of London and suburbs ; of which he had so early in- 
telligence, and was so ready to assist with his presence, that it 
became a common saying, " His horse smelt a fire as soon as *t 
happened." 

The Earl of Craven, in his younger days, was one^rf the most 
accomplished gentlemen in Europe; a useful subject, charitable, 
abstemious as to himself, generous to others, familiar in his con- 
versation, and universally beloved. He died unmarried, April 9, 



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OF ENGLAND. 183 

1697, aged 88 yean and 10 months, and was buried at Bbley, 
near Coventry, April 20, following-. 

Whereupon the dignity of Lord Craven of Hampsted Marshall, 
according to the entail, devolved on William, son and heir of Sir 
William Craven; which Sir William Craven, born August 26, 1638, 
was the eldest son and heir of Sir Thomas Craven, of Appletree- 
wick, in Craven, brother to Sir William Craven of Lenchwike, and 
Sir Anthony Craven, sons of Robert Craven of Appletree-wick, son 
and heir of Henry Craven of the same place, elder brother of Wil- 
liam Craven, grandfather of William, earl of Craven. 

RICHARD SACKVILLE, fifth earl of Dorset. 
'Bouquet sc. In the " Royal and Noble Authors" by 
Park. i 

Richard, fifth earl of Dorset, born in Dorset-house, Sept. 16, 
1622, and was elected for the borough of East-Grin sted to that par- 
liament began at Westminster, November 3, 1640, bearing the title 
of Lord Buckhurst, and was in the list of those who were reproached 
for being Slraffordiant, being oae of the fifty-nine who voted against 
the attainder of the Karl of Strafford, His lordship succeeded his 
father is 1652, and on the meeting of the House of Lords, in 1660 
(after being laid aside by Cromwell), the Earl of Dorset was ad- 
mitted, with other noble peers, who having succeeded to the honours 
of their fathers, had never sat in the house. He was before this in, 
credit with other nobles, who meant to restore the royal family, 
monarchy, and episcopacy ; and, on taking his place in the house, 
iraa at the head of all affairs in that critical time, when the Lords 
concurred with, General Monk, and had a great share in the happy 
settlement ef the kingdom. On their first assembling, they sent a 
message to the general, " That they would employ their councils 
and utmost endeavours with him, for the procuring a safe and well- 
grounded peace." 

April 26, 1660, the Earl of Dorset was one of the peers ap- 
pointed to frame an ordinance, for constituting a committee of 
safety of both houses, and report the same to the house. The day 
after, they .ordered * conference with the House of Commons, to 
tmiider of some ■■fc-ags ami means to make up tie breaches and distrac- 
tions of tie kingdom ; end, appointing a committee to consider of the 
privileges of their own house, the Earl of Dorset was chosen chair' 
man of that committee. . 



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134 BIOGRAPHICAL DISTORT 

On May 1, they ordered the Earl of Dorset and fire other loci, 
or any four, to meet every Saturday in the afternoon, as a com- 
mittee to peruse and perfect the journal-book of their basse, o« 
a-week. And it appears by the journals, thai the Earl of Dorset 
was alio chairman for settling the militia; and dun-man of the 
committee for the king's reception, and of several other committees. 
On May 2, it was ordered, that the statues of the late king's majesty 
be again set up io all the places from whence the same were pulled 
down, and that the arms of the commonwealth be demolished 
wherever they are, and the king's arms set u p in their room : and 
that the king's majesty be publicly prayed for by all ministers in 
their churches; and that some place be considered of, where 
General Monk's statue shall be set up. ■ All which particulars were 
referred to the committee of privileges (whereof the Earl of Dorset 
was chairman), to consider and make report to the boose. On 
May 4, the Earl of Dorset reported from the Lords the judgment 
given in the house against the Earl of Northampton, and others, 
in July, 1642 ; on which it was ordered, that the Earl of Lincoln, 
the Earl of Dorset, the Viscount Say and Sele, and the Lord Craven, 
do presently meet, and draw up an order to repel the said judg- 
ment, and report the same to the house presently ; and the Lord 
Chief-baron Wild to assist their lordships. Thereupon the same 
day the Earl of Dorset reported the draught of an order, concern- 
ing the nine impeached lords, which was read, and approved of by 
the house as follows. 

" Whereas upon Wednesday the 20th of July, 1642, it was by 
the Lords, then assembled in parliament, awarded and adjudged io 
these words following : That is to say, that Spencer, eavl of North- 
ampton; William, earl of Devonshire; Henry, earl of Dover; 
Henry, earl of Monmouth; Charles, lord Howard of Charlton; 
Robert, lord Rich; Charles, lord Grey of Ruthen ; Thomas, lord 
Coventry, and Arthur, lord Capel, shall not sit and vote in the 
Lords' house, during this present parliament. 2. That they shall 
not enjoy the privilege of parliament. 3. That they shall stand 
committed to the Tower, during the pleasure of this house, with 
other matters therein contained, as by the said judgment and award 
remaining on record may appear. Now upon serious debates and 
considerations, had by the Lords now assembled in parliament, of 
the said judgment or award, and of the matters and things therein 
contained ; they do declare, ordain, and adjudge the said judgment 
or award, and every matter therein, shall be repealed, annulled, 
and made void, &c. 



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OF ENGLAND. 185; 

- Oh May 8, they appointed a committee to consider or all things 
for the reception of the king, in such a manner as maybe most for 
his honour and expedition of his coming, of which the Earl of 
Dorset was chosen chairman ; and sent a message to the Com- 
mons to join a proportionate number of their House to them, to meet 
and agree, in whet manner his majesty's reception in England may 
be most for his honour. The nest day the Earl of Dorset reported 
from the committee of privileges, " That their lordships think fit 
for the peers of this kingdom, to assess themselves with horse and 
arms for the militia, and not to be rated and assessed by the com- 
missioners of the county," which was accordingly ordered by the 
house. The same day he reported from another committee, an 
ordinance for constituting a committee of both houses of parliament, for 
managing the great affairs of the kingdom, and settling the militia for 
the safety thereof, which was read twice and recommitted. Also a 
committee being then appointed to receive information where. any of 
the king's goods, jewels, or pictures are, and to advise of some 
course how the same may be restored to his majesty, he was chosen 
chairman thereof: and on the 12th of May, ordered that all persons 
possessed of any of the king's goods, jewels, or pictures, shall bring 
them in to the committee within seven days, on forfeiture of all such 
goods, &c. and that this order be forthwith printed and published. 
May 15, the Earl of Dorset reported from the committee, for the 
king's reception, " That tbey yesterday had before them several of 
the king's servants, and Sir Robert Fenn, and Sir Henry Wood, 
clerk of the green-cloth, Mr. Kennersley, of the wardrobe ; Mr. 
Armory, of^the stable, and Mr. Jackson, cleric of the kitchen, gave 
in their estimates, viz. 

£. s. d. 
For necessaries for the king's present reception, as > ^nnn q n 
silver plates of all sorts and sizes .... 3 

For table-linen of all sorts . 300 

For a week's diet, at 50i per diem 350 

For coaches and stables 2950 

For furnishing his majesty's bed-chamber . . . 1801 19 

For repairing the mews 1000 

Somerset-house estimated at 500 

The crown and sceptre, besides robes .... 900 

In all £14,501 19 
Which report was confirmed. 
vol. iv. 2 b 



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180 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

May the 29th, the Lords went, as * boose, to wait en his majesty 
at Whitehall; and the next day the Earl of j fanri i es t CT , tie 
Speaker, acquainting them, that the Dokeof York, and uVDokecf 
Gloucester, commanded him to return thanks for their lordships' 
civility to them, and to signify their desire to cone and sit in the 
house as members : and that places may be provided for them, 
the Earl of Northumberland, the Earl of Dorset, and die Earl of 
Bridgewatcr, were named to attend immediately his majesty, and 
nnjuaint him, that there being no precedents that shew where 
their proper places are, they desire bis majesty will please to 
Consult with what persons he pleases herein, and then to deter- 
mine the place himself; and their lordships were to acquaint 
the Duke of York and the Duke of Gloucester with his majesty s 
answer. 

Whereupon, on their return, the Earl of Northumberland re- 
ported, " That his majesty said, he conceived that the seat on the 
right hand of the state, where the king of Scots anciently used to 
■it, will be of no more use now, seeing that title is involved in his 
majesty. Ahd his majesty said, he himself sat in that seat as Priace 
Of Wales, therefore desired that place may be reserved for the 
Prince of Wales, and that the seats on the left-band of the state 
may be fitted up speedily for his brothers, the Duke of York and 
Duke of Gloucester. And accordingly the House gave directions 
to have it done." 

July 30, 1660, he was, jointly with Thomas earl of Berkshire, 
constituted lord -lieu ten ant of Middlesex, and city of Westminster; 
and in October, the same year, he was commissioned with other 
lords, for the trials of the regicides of King Charles I. At the 
coronation of Charles II. April 23, 1661, he was appointed sewer of 
England for that day, and had the Earl of Chesterfield his assistant- 
On November 3 r 1661, be was admitted, with his Royal Highness 
the Duke of York, into the- Society of the Inner Temple. 

On July 15, 1670, he was constituted jointly with Charles, lord 
Buckhurst, his son, Lord- lieutenant of the county of Sussex, and 
custos rotulorum thereof. The Earl of Dorset died August 27, 
1677. In his- private capacity, he .was- an indulgent husband, a 
tender father, and a generous friend. 

He had to wife the Lady Frances, daughter to Lionel Cranfieid, 
first earl of Middlesex, and at length heir to Lionel, third earl of 
Middlesex, her brother. By this lady he had issue seven sops, and 
six daughters : 1. Charles, who succeeded him in his honours and 



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OF ENGLAND. 187 

estates; 2. Edward, who was bora April 2, 1641, and died un- 
married in the year 1678 ; 3. Lionel, born June 25, 1645, and died 
July 21, following; 4. Richard, born April 30, 164-6, and died in 
the year 1712; 5. a second Lionel, born Oct. 25, 1656, and died 
young; 6. Cran field, bom Dec. 18, 1660, and died Jan. 1, follow- 
ing ; 7. Thomas, botn Feb. 3, 1662, and died Aug. 14, 1675. The 
six daughters were, the Ladies Elizabeth, Anne, and Catharine, 
who all died young; Lady Mary, born Feb. 4, 1646, married Roger 
Boyle, lord Broghill, son and heir of Roger, first earl of Orrery; 
Lady Anne, born June 7, 1650, married Alexander, fourth earl of 
Hume, in Scotland; Lady Frances, born Feb. 6, 1655, married 
Dec. It, 1683, Sir George Lane, of Tuske, in the county of Ros- 
common, knt. and bart. and then principal secretary of state, and of 
the privy council to Charles I(. in Ireland, and afterward created 
Lord Viscount Lanesborough, 

Don CARLO, earl of Plymouth. J.Smith e$c. k.sk, 
mezz. 

Charles Fitzroy, earl of Plymouth, commonly called Don Carlos, Created 
was a natural son of Charles II. by Mrs. Catherine Peg,* daughter Jgj^ 88 
of Thomas Peg, of the county of Derby, esq. This young; noble- 
man, who inherited his mother's beauty, died at Tangier, Oct- 17, 
1680. He married Bridget, daughter of the lord- treasurer Danby, 
who was afterwards married to Dr. Bisse, late bishop of Hereford. 



CHARLES BEAUCLAIRE, earl of Burford; and g«w 
JAMES, lord BEAUCLAIRE, his brother. White sc. wo, ' 
whole lengths ; h.sh. In Guillim's "Heraldry;" fol. 

There are two beautiful anonymous prints, engraved 
by A. Blootcling, of these brothers ; the elder is in a boji~ 
net; the younger, in a cap and feather. The authenticity 
of these heads hath been questioned ; but upon a strict 
examination, I have no doubt concerning them. 

• She is sometin 
of Km- i, baronet. 



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186 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

The Earl of Burford and Lord Beaudaire were natural sons of 
Charles II. by Mm. Owjrnn, There is a pic tote of Mre.G*jon 
and her two sons at Welbeck. It is said, that before the Duke of 
St. Alban » was ennobled, hie mother, calling to him in the king's 
pretence, said, " Come hither, you little bastard ;** which the bag 
in a gentle manner reproved her for : she told him that she had so 
better name to coll him by. He was soon after created Baron of 
Hedin gton, and Earl of Burford, both in the county of Oxford ; and 
to the heirs male of his body, with remainder, for default of neb 
issue to his brother James, lord Beauelatre, and the heirs male 
of his body ; which James died in France, about Michaelmas, is 
the year 1680, unmarried. Charles, earl of Burford, was also farther 
advanced to the dignity of duke of St. Alton's, by tetters patent 
dated Jan. 10, 1683-4, and was constituted registrar of the high 
court of chancery, as also master- falconer of England, with re- 
mainder to the heirs male of bis body. 

In the reign of James II. bis grace had a regiment of horse; 
which, being under the command of his lieutenant-colonel, Lang- 
ston, was among the first that went over to the Prince of Orange, 
on his landing in the West. His grace at that time was with the 
emperor's army in Hungary, having been at the siege of Belgrade, 
where he gained great honour in the general assault, on Septem- 
ber 6, 1688. Being of full age, he was introduced into the House 
of Peers, Sept. 26, 1692, and the year after made the campaign 
under King William, arriving in the camp at Park, near Louvain, 
in June, 1693. Returning with King William into England, be 
was sworn captain of the band of pensioners, Nor. 30, 1693, and 
served in the campaign of 1695. 

In 1697, the King of France acquainting his majesty with tbe 
Duke of Burgundy's marriage, he was pleased at Kensington, 
Dec. 21, to appoint his grace, then one of the lords of the bed- 
chamber, to return the compliment of the French King and the 
Dauphin. 

Queen Anne continued his grace captain of the band of pen- 
sioners, and, at the head of them, he closed the procession, Sept. 7, 
1704, on her majesty's going to St. Paul's on the thanksgiving-day 
for the glorious victory obtained at Blenheim, or Hockstet, on 
August 13, .that year. On the change of the ministry, in 1710, his 
grace resigned his place of captain of the band of pensioners ; but 
George I. on his accession to the throne, re-instated him in that 
post; and constituted him, Nov. 12, 1714, lord- lieutenant, and 



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OF ENGLAND. 199 

custos rotulorum of Berkshire; and March 31, 1718, he wat 
elected one of the knights companions of the most noble order of 
llie Garter, and installed at Windsor, on April 30, following. 

The Duke of St. Moan's died May 11, 1726, in the fifty- sixth 
year of his age ; at which time, besides the offices before mentioned, 
he enjoyed those of high-steward of Windsor and Oakingham, in 
Berkshire. He married April 13, 1694, the Lady. Diana Vere, 
daughter, and at length, sole heir of Aubrey de Vere, the twentieth 
and last earl of Oxford, of that noble- family, whereof Alberick, 
their direct ancestor, is. mentioned in doomsday-book 'to be an 
earl in the reign of King Edward the Confessor. She was first lady 
of the bed-chamber, and lady of the stole, to Queen Caroline, 
when princess of Wales. His grace by her (who survived him till 
Jan. 15, 1741-2) left eight sons, of whom Charles, the eldest, suc- 
ceeded his grace as second duke of St. Alban's. 

ROBERT, earl of Yarmouth, &c. lord-lieutenant 
and vice-admiral of the county of Norfolk. P. Van- 
drebanc sc. large sh. 

This print gives a just idea of his person, which, in the latter part 
of his life, was unwieldly from immoderate fatness, to which his 
father was much inclined. 

Robert, earl of Yarmouth. E.Luttcrelp. Lloyd 
e.vc. 1682 ; mezz. 

Robert, earl of Yarmouth ; copied from Vatidre- 
banc. B. Reading sc. 8vo. 

Robert, earl of Yarmouth, son of Sir William Paston, of Oxnead, Crested 
in Norfolk, by Catharine, daughter of Robert Bertie, earl of Lind- j^ 30 * 
sey, possessed many virtues as well as ornamental and amiable 
qualities, and was one of the most learned and polite among the 
nobility. He was so zealous a cavalier, that he, in his father's life- 
time, distressed himself to supply Charles II. with money in his 
exile. He was so devoted to the court, that he was threatened with 
an impeachment by the popular party, though they, had nothing 
material to lay to his charge, and no man was was more capable 
of defending himself to advantage. About eight years before his 



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190 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

death, he was attacked by several ruffians, who shot fire ballets 
into his coach, and one into his body. He had such a sense of his 
providential escape, that he solemnly kept an anniversary thanks- 
giving upon that day to the end of his life. He was exemplary in 
the duties of religion, and expressed a strong sense of it at the 
approach of death. He died on the 8th of March, 1682, aged 
51 years, and was buried at Oinead. 



GEORGE BERKELEY, earl of Berkeley; in kit 

robes, k. sh. (Loggan). 

George, earl of Berkeley. Bocquct sc. In "Kobk 
Authors," by Mr. Park, 

George, earl of Berkeley. W. N. Gardiner. 

George, earl of Berkeley, descended in a direct line from Robert 
Fitzharding, who was of the royal house of Denmark, became at 
the death of his father, in 1658, 13th Lord Berkeley, and having 
greatly manifested his loyalty to King Charles II. in order to his 
restoration, as well as afterward, by divers eminent services, was 
advanced to the title of Viscount Dursley, as also to the degree of 
an earl, by the title of Earl of Berkeley, Sept. 1 1, 1679, having 
been sworn of his majesty's most honourable privy -council, July 17, 
1678. 

His lordship was, by King James II. made custos rotulorum of 
the county of Gloucester, in Feb. 1684-5, and on July 21, 1685, 
was also sworn of his privy-council. At that mornarch's first 
withdrawing himself, on Dec. 10, 1680, he was one of the lords 
who met at Guildhall, next day, and having sent for the lord 
mayor, and aldermen, subscribed to a declaration, "That they 
would assist his highness the Prince of Orange, in obtaining a free 
parliament, wherein our laws, liberties, and properties may be 
secured ; the church of England in particular, with a due liberty, 
to Protestant dissenters; and in general, the Protestant religion 
over the whole world may be supported and encouraged, &c." At 
the accession of William and Mary, he was appointed one of their 
privy-council ; and July 27, 1689, constituted custos rotulorum of 
die county of Surrey. 



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OF ENGLAND. 191 

He bestowed upon Sion College a very valuable library, wbicli 
/as collected by Sir Robert Coke ;* and was author of a tittle 
ook, valuable for its merit as well as its rarity, entitled " Histo- 
ical Applications, and occasional Meditations upon several Sub- 
acts, written by a person of Honour," 1670 ; 12mo.+ In this book 
re several striking instances of the testimony which some men 
if eminence have borne to the importance of religious life, and the 
.(insolation to be received from it, especially at the approach of 
leath.J Ob. 1698, 

This noble earl was buried at Cranford, in Middlesex, where a 
norm merit is erected to his memory with this inscription : 

'' Here lyeth the body of George, earl of Berkeley, Viscount 
Dursley, Baron of Berkeley, Mowbray, Seagrave, and Bruce, who 
had the honour to be a privy, counsel lor to K. Charles II. and 
K, James ; eminent for his affability, charity, and generosity. He 
married Elizabeth, one of the coheiresses of John Massikg- 
BEAiin, esq. of the family of the Massing beards, in Lincolnshire. 
He departed this life the 14th of October, 1698, Ml. 71, in hopes 
of a blessed resurrection ; for the merciful shall obtain mercy." 



VISCOUNTS, &c. 

THOMAS BELLASYSE, lord viscount Faucon- 
berg, &c. Maria Beak p. A. Blootelitig sc. 1G76; large 
h. sh. scarce and fine, 

Thomas Belasyse, (Bellasyse, or Bellasis), 
viscount Falconberg, White sc. h. sh. In Guillims 
"Heraldry." 

• There is ■ printed catalogue of (lie book] belonging to this college. 

t Fenton, in his " Observations on Waller's Poem," to tbe author of " Historical 
application*," &c. says, " He was a person of strict virtue and piety j and of such 
in o i idistingui siting affability to men of nil tanks and parties, that I have been told 
Mr, Wyclierly strained hii character into that of Lord Plausible in the "Plain 
Dealer." The founder of this noble family is said to have been s younger son to 
one of the Danish kings, who attended the Duke of Normandy, and settled in 
England after the Conquest." 

1 I had seen this book, but did not know who wrote it, before tbe publication of 
Oh second edition of the" Catalogue of Royal and Noble Authors," where there is 
■ farther account of it. 



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192 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

Thomas Belasyse, viscount Falconberg ; mezz. 
A. Blooteting Ato. 

Thomas, second viscount Falconberg, married first, Mildred, 
daughter to Nicholas Sanderson, viscount Castleton, and she dy- 
ing without issue by him, he married, secondly, Mary, daughter of 
Oliver Cromwell, at Hampton Court, Nov. )8, 1657. The Earl of 
Clarendon, gives this account of him. 

'* After Cromwell was declared Protector, and in great power, 
he married his daughter to the Lord Falconberg, the owner of a 
very great estate in Yorkshire, and descended of a family eminently 
loyal. There were many reasons to believe that this young gentle- 
nan, being then about three or four and twenty years of age, of 
great vigour and ambition, had many good purposes, that he thought 
that alliance might qualify and enable him to perform: his marriage 
was celebrated at Whitehall" (Wood has given the time at Hamp- 
ton Court), " with all imaginable pomp and lustre; and it was ob- 
served, that though it was performed in public, according to tbe 
rites and ceremonies then in use, they were presently afterwards in 
private married by ministers ordained by bishops, and according to 
the form in the book of common prayer, and this with the privity 
of Cromwell." 

In 1657, he was made one of the council of state ; and in June, 
1 658, when Dunkirk was taken by the Spaniards, the French king 
sent the Duke of Crequi, together with Monsieur Mancini, nephew to 
Cardinal Mazarine, prime minister, to congratulate Cromwell on it; 
who, in return of the compliment, sent his son-in-law, the Lord Fal- 
conberg, to Calais, to congratulate the French monarch, for their 
joint prosperity. 

This was the only employment the Lord Falconberg had under 
Cromwell ; for, as the noble author above-mentioned relates, " his 
domestic delights were lessened every day ; he plainly discovered 
that his son Falconberg's heart was set upon an interest destructive 
to his, and grew to hate him perfectly." And Whitlock relates, that 
Richard, the Protector's son, was betrayed by his near relations, and 
those of his council. In 1659, he was by the council of state sent 
to the Tower. 

: That he was in the secret of the restoration of King Charles II. 
is evident from General Monk's conferring on him the regiment 
which was Sir Arthur Haslerjg's, on April 25, the same day the par- 
liament met that restored the king. 



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OK ENGLAND. 193' 

Bishop Burnet writes, that Cromwell's daughter, married to tha 
Lord Falconberg, " was a wise and worthy woman, more likely to 
have maintained the post (of Protector) than either of her brothers; 
according to a saying that went of her, that those who wore breeches 
deserved petticoats better ; but if those In petticoats had been in 
breeches they would have held faster." It may be presumed, that 
she was influenced by this lord, her husband, and (from what had 
been said) concurred with him in the restoration. 

King Charles II. was bo well satisfied with his lordship's conduct, 
tbat he constituted him lord -lieu tenant of the bishopric of Durham, 
July 27, 1660; and the same year also made him lord-lieutenant and 
custos rotulorum of the North Riding of Yorkshire, which he held 
till 1687, when, not complying with the designs of King James II. 
he was put out of the commission. 

He was also, by King Charles II. sent ambassador to the state of 
Venice, and the Princes of Italy; and made captain of the band of 
gentlemen pensioners, on the surrender of that employment by his 
uncle John, lord Bellasyse, of Warlahy, in 1673. He was likewise 
one of those sworn of the privy. council on April 21, 1679, when his 
majesty declared he was resolved to lay aside the use he had hitherto 
made of a single ministry, and to constitute such a privy-council as 
may not only be fit for the consultation and digestion of all business, 
but may be best informed in the true constitutions of the state, and 
thereby the most able to counsel him in all the affairs and interests 
of this crown and nation. 

On the accession of King William and Queen Mary, he was swom 
of their privy-council, and on March 28, 1689, constituted lord- 
lieutenant of the North Riding of Yorkshire, having, as before- 
mentioned, been put out of the commission by King James II. and 
in consideration of his great merits, was advanced to the honour of 
Earl Falconberg, on April 9, in the first year of their reign. He died 
without issue, Dec. 31, 1700, and was buried at Cockswold, in the 
county of York, where a monument is erected to his memory, with 
the following inscription. 

M.S. 

H. S. E. 

Thomas Belasyse, Comes Falconberg, Baro de Varum, 

Vir Primarius, Priscas Nobilttatis Eiemplar, 

Animi tnagnitudine, fortrtudine, Prudentia, 

Et mum agendarum Peritia Singular!, 

Ad publics obeund a minnera 

VOL. iv. 2 c 

D,gil zed by GOOgle 



WA BIOGRAPHICAL BISTORT ■ 

. ' Vere format oe. ■ 

, ' Regies PensJonarium Cobortia Prefect** 

Sob Carolo II*" tub quo, et Gutielmo I ll 1 "- 

Com. Ebor qua ad Aquilonem vergit Prorex, 

Quorum utriq; a sanctioribua Connilos 

Utriq ; fidus parirer, et charns ; 

Nee inter Angloi solum, apud exteratt *ero Gente* i 

Sub Carolo II**' apud Rempublicam Venetam. 

Sabaudies item, Hetruriaeq; Duces, 

Splendid a Legatione functus, 

Regies Dignitati, Regniq ; Conunodia 

Provide Consuluit, 

Gravi tcr satisfecit. 

Gemino FceUx Coojugio; 

Mildred* primum, Vice-Comitis de Castleton Filial. 

Poatea Marite* Cromwelliorum stirpe, Patrc Olivero, Pragenitat, 

Ilia, brevla ssvi, mtesto Marito auperstite decesait, 

Hsec Marito msesta auperfuit, 

Quam indiatolubibs Amor, non ficta Pietaa, 

> Studiumq; Conjugi morem gcrendi, 

Caram Marito, Posterisq; Exemplum 

Jure reddiderunt. 

Ptochotrophio propriii sumptions extruclo, 

Hujuflce Pacocbite Pas tori. 

Anuuum in perpetuum stipendium kgavit. 

, Et cum bene Latere fruttra alias quesierat, 

Septnaginta et duos emensus Annos, 

Quietem bactenus deaegatam 

Mature in C alum secessu tandem oonsecutns- est 

Dec. 31~-A. S. H. 1700™- 

WILLIAM, viscount STAFFORD. Luiterel f, 

large Ato, mezz. 

William, viscount Stafford; in an oval. R.Cooper 
sc. Fr.<m the print of the Howard Family,; 4to.. . 

Ctttui 'William Howard, viscount Stafford, was accused in October, 1678, 
1640. of conspiring against the life of his sovereign. He happened to be 

* Tli* Mid Mary Uwd March 14, 171,3. 



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OF ENGLAND; i 195 

from his own house When lie was sent for; but confiding in hfe 
innocence, be voluntarily surrendered himself in two days afterv 
wards. The fury of the times was such, and the people so -blinded 
with' false leal, that he was one of the five Peers impeached by the 
House of Commons of being concerned in that commonly Called 
(be Popish plot; though, the discerning part of mankind then, and 
the unprejudiced since, looked upon it as a contrivance calculated 
to (serve the nefarious views of some traiterous politicians. How- 
ever, he was, upon the evidence of the perjured Titus Oates, and 
other flagitious wretches, convicted of high-treason, fifty-five Peers 
pronouncing him guilty, and thirty-one voting him not guilty. His 
lordship being brought to the scaffold, on December 'following, 
averred Kis innocence to the last, solemnly protesting before God 
and man, that what the witnesses against him had sworn,' was false; 
and submitted to the axe with great composure and devotion. Hie 
fate was lamented by all good men ; and his enemies were disap- 
pointed in their scheme of overthrowing tbecdnetitutio'n at that 
time. 

On June 3, 1685, a bill passed the House of Peers, entitled, "An 
act for reversing the attainder of William, late viscount Stafford ;" 
in the preamble to which it was asserted, " That it was now mani- 
fest, that William, late viscount Stafford, dieil innocent; and that 
the testimony, on which he was convicted, was false; as also, that 
it appeared by record of the King's Bench, that one of the wit- 
nesses was convicted of perjury." " 

By his lady, be had three sons, and six daughters. The sons 
Were, 1st, Henry, afterward earl of -Stafford: 2d, John, continuator 
of the line ; and 3rd, Francis, who, being groom of the bedchamber 
to King James II. when, on December 17, 1638, atone in the morn- 
ing, he removed from Whitehall, attended his master into France, 
and died at Paris, in 1692, leaving, by Eleanor his wife, daughter 
of Henry Stanford, of NeW Inn, in Staffordshire, esq. a son, Henry, 

who wedded daughter of Bartholomew Berkeley, of Speckle J, 

in Worcestershire, esq. but died without issue. 

Of the six daughters of Lord Stafford, Alathea, Ursula, and 
Mary, were nuns ; Isabella, the second, was the third wife of John 
Powlett, marquis of Winchester ; Anastatia, the fifth, was married 
to George Holman, of Warworth, in the county of Northampton, esq. 
and Helena, the youngest, died soon after she was born. . 
' Henry, the eldest son, in consideration of his father's sufferings, 
and his noble descent, was created Earl of Stafford, October &, 



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196 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

1688, with remainder, for want of issue male, to John and France, 
hia brother*, and their heirs male respectively. By the same patent, 
Mary, hia mother, wai made countess of Stafford for life, and his 
siatera were allowed the rank of daughter* of an earl of F.ngland, 
and to use and bear the surname of Stafford. Thie Henry earl of 
Stafford, retiring; in 1688 with his sovereign into France, was, on 
April 9, 1694, married at St. Germain's en Laye, to Claude Char- 
lotte, eldest daughter of Philibert, count of Grammont, and dying 
April 19, 1719, without issue, was succeeded by William, son of 
bis brother John Stafford Howard. 

• WILLIAM, lord RUSSEL. Knelkrp. Houbraken 
sc. In the collection of the Duke of Bedford. Tllust. 
Head. 

William, lord Russel; J3f,44,.1683. Knelkrp. 
Vandrebanc sc. large h.sh. 

William, lord Russel. Knelkr p. Picart sc. 
direx. 1724; 4to. 

William, lord Russel, JEt. 44, &c. Cooper esc. 
mezz. 4to. 

William, lord Russel, &c. Savage sc. In a large 
h.sh. with several others. 

William, lord Russell, mezz. E.Lutterel. 

William, lord Russel. C. Knight sc. 1792. In 
Lady RussePs "Letters." Bvo. 

Lord Russel. Bocquet sc. In "Grammont;" 8t». 



WiLLiAM,lordRussELL. E.Scrivensc. 1814. From 
the original of Sir P.Lely. In Mr. Lodge's " IUtw 
trious Portraits," 



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6P ENGLAND. 197 

His portrait at Woburn Abbey bears a strict resemblance to 
EI ou broken 's print. 

'William, lord Russel, was a man of probity and virtue, and 
worthy of a better age than that in which he lived ; an age, when 
tilence and freedom of speech were equally criminal ; when a.per- 
u red witness was more eiteemed than an honest patriot, and law 
ind equity were wrested to the purposes of an enraged faction, 
and an arbitrary court. As he was apprehensive for the civil and 
religious liberties of bis country, he distinguished himself by pro- 
moting the bill for excluding the Duke of York from the crown, 
which he carried up to the House of Peers.* He thought' resist- 
ance preferable to slavery ; he had moreover the honesty to avow 
it, and persisted in it to the last, though a retraction of this prin- 
ciple would probably have saved his life.-)- He was accused of 
being an accomplice in the Rye-House Plot, and consequently of 
conspiring the death of the king, a crime of which he was abso- 
lutely innocent. All that was proved against him, by suspected 
witnesses, was, that treasonable words were uttered in his presence, ' 
though he bore no part in, or assented to, the conversation which 
occasioned them. When he had taken his last leave of his lady, ' 
he said that " the bitterness of death was past ;" and he soon after 
went to his execution, and submitted to the fatal stroke with a re- 
solution worthy. of the cause in which he suffered. He was the pro- 
tomartyr of patriotism in this reign: Algernon Sidney was the 
second.J He.was beheaded July 81, 1683. 

• Col. Titus, in bis speech for excluding the Duke of York, declared, " Thai to 
accept of expedients for securing the Protestant religion, after aucli a king mounted 
the throne, was aa strange a> if there were a lion in the lobby, mid they should 
vnte, that they would rather secure themselves hy letting him in, and chaining him, 
than by keeping him out." This sentiment it put into Terse by Bramston, in his 
" Art of Politics." 

t See Birch's "life of Tiilotson," p. 101, el seq. Edit 3. 

J Patriotism is perhaps the most frail, as it is the most suspected of all human 
virtues : and it seems, from, some recent instances, to be almost as difficult to bring 
positive proof of the sincerity of it, as it is to prove a negative in point of chastity. 
The patriotic characters of Lord Russell and Algernon Sidney, supported by an ap- 
parent inflexibility of conduct, and sealed by martyrdom, seemed to be fixed upon 
an immoveable foundation. Bnt this foundation, everlasting as it seemed lo he, 
has, in the opinion of some, lately sustained an alarming ihock.$ Pottibiy, in a 
mercenary age, when other means bad been tried in vain, they thought it expedient 

gee Barillon's dispatchesy in the Appendix to Dalrymple's " Memoirs," 



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198 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

The LORD GREY. Lefyp. Browne; k.tk.mtxz* 

altered to Samuel Butler. 

Thomas, ton of Thomas lord Grey, and grandma of Henry, earl 
of Stamford, succeeded his grandfather in tide and estate, after the 
demise of his father, in 1673. He «m iapnsoacd far being con- 
cerned in the Duke of Monmouth's rebellion; bat admitted Co bail, 
and nt last had the benefit of the pardon granted, on March 19, 
1685-6. April 24, 1696, he was appointed krd-lieateaant and 
CtKtoa rotulorum of the county of Derby; and April 28, 1697, ™ 
made chancellor of the dutcby of Lancaster, lord-lieutenant and 
custos rotulorum of the county of Leicester ; and at the funeral of 
Queen Mary, bore one of the banners of England and France quar- 
terly; and in the reign of Queen Anna, was one of her privy-council. 
He first married Elisabeth, daughter of Sir Daniel Herrey, of Combe, 
in Surrey, knt. and secondly, Mary, daughter and coheir to Joseph 
Haynard, of Gunnersbury, in the county of Middlesex, esq. son and 
heir to Sir John Maynard, knt. one of the commissioners of the greft 

'to baffle the arts Md instruments of comtption by taming them against itself, ant 
to Mm to yield to il from an boneit motive of liberty; anil that in this " rj»«ai 
WMiM juUify Iks mtaw." But Ihii i> too disingenuous a refiucraeut in politics to 
admit of any siren. It ia much more probable, that Barillon appropriated a large 
portion of secret service-money to fall own use, and artfully placed it to the account 
Of Algernon Sidney. Hence he might at once have gained credit with the king Va 
master, by persuading him that be bad conquered the stubborn virtue of a formidiole 
enemy to despotism, and paid that attention to his own emolument, which wasttrj 
probably hi> principal aim. Fond » mankind are of novelty and censure, they 
Karce ever efface the early i repressions which thej hate received in favuur of those 
they love and admire. Hence it is that we are extremely averse from belieriof 
that there was any real duplicity uf character in these illustrious persons. 



The whole matter appears to roe to turn upon this short question; which is lie 
fairer object or belief; the patriotism of great and established characters, or it* 
veracity of a man employed in evil arts, and the avowed minister of corruption . I 
can by no means persuade myself to give credit to Barillon't facts against the tenia 
Of the lives of such men as Lord Russell and Algernon Sidney. If the venerable 
name* of Craiimer, Latimer, and Ridley ihould be, and I make no question but thrj 
aw, wantonly and wickedly aspersed in the French archives, they would still, in oj I 
rltimstiun, retain their primitive purity and dignity, and stand foremost in the brijbt 
list of our Protestant martyrs. 

• I believe ibis is the portrait of Ralph Lord Grey of Werke, who succeeded IA 
father William, and died 1675— W. Bicnaaiiaoa. 



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OF ENGLAND. I9& 

eal of England. By his first lady he had two sons, who died, 
nfants, and a daughter Diana, who died young; and no issue by his. 
econd lady. 

The Earl of Stamford died Jan. 3L, 1719-20, aged 67, without 
•urviving issue, when his titles, and part of his estate, descended 
o Harry Grey, esq. son to John Grey, third son of Henry, the first 
•arl of Stamford. 



First DUDLEY, lord North, from the original 
picture in the collection of the Earl of Guildford ; in the 
' Noble Authors," by Park; 1800. 

Dudley, lord North ; oval. Thane exc. 

Sir Dudley North, succeeded to the title of Lard North, by the 
leath of his grandfather in 1 600, which he enjoyed till some years 
lfter the restoration. He was one of the finest gentlemen in the 
court of King James, or rather bis son Prince Henry ; and way 
(says Mr. Roger North) full of spirit and flame. In 1645 he a -' 
pears to have acted with the parliament, and was nominated by 
them to the administration of the admiralty, in conjunction with 
the Earls of Essen, Northumberland, Warwick, and others. After 
he had consumed the greater part of his estate in gallantries, ha 
retired and lived more honourably in the country upon what was 
left, than ever he had done before. He there amused himself with 
writing " A Forest of Varieties, a collection of Essays in prose and 
verse, 1659,"* and enj'oyed his life to the great age of 85, so as to 
see his grandchildren almost grown up. Ob. 1666. 

He married Frances, daughter and coheir of Sir John Brocket, 
of Brocket-hall, in Hertfordshire, and by her had issue four sons ; 
Dudley, who succeeded him ; Charles, and Robert, who died in his 
lifetime, and. John ; also two daughters, Dorothy, married to 
Richard, lord Dacre, at St. Margaret's, Westminster, Jan. 4, 1624, 
and after his decease, to Chaloner Chute, of the Vine, in Hamp- 
shire, esq. ; and Elizah^th, who died unmarried. 

Second DUDLEY, lord North. E. Harding ; from 

* SeaBrydgo'i "Memoir? of ihe Peers of England," ml. i. p. 543, and "NoHe 
Autbon," by Psik, vol. if i. 



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200 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORT 

the original picture in the collection of the Earl of 
Guildford. S. Harding; 1799. 

Dudley, second lord North. Rivers &r**. from 
the original picture, 6}c. in the " Noble Authors," 
by Park. 

Sir Dudley, the fourth Lord North, bad a learned education b 
the university of Cambridge, and was made K.B. as early as 1616, 
at the creation of Charles, prince of Wales. He was an eminent 
instance of filial duty to his father, before whom he would not pat 
on his hat, or sit, unless enjoined to do it. In the early part of his 
life he travelled abroad, and served as captain under Sir Franca 
Vera. He served his country in several parliaments, and was misled 
to sit in that of 1640, till he was excluded : after which he lived 
privately in the country, at Tostock, in Suffolk, and aroused himself 
with writing " Observations and advices economical," 12mo. 1669, 
in which is the epitome of his life. He also wrote a volume of 
Essays, printed in 1682, 8vo. Ob, 1677.* 



ANTHONY ASHLEY COOPER, lord Ashley. 
R. Thompson exc. h.sh. mezx. 

Lord Ashley, inscribed " The son of the Lord Chan- 
cellor ;" mezz. Lely ; R. White exc. 

Lord Ashley is better known as the son of the lord chancellor 
Shaftesbury, and the father of the author of the "'Characteristics," 
. than from any thing extraordinary in his own character. His sou, 
who was educated with the greatest care, was, in the early part of 
his life, under the tuition of Mrs. Birch, the learned daughter of a 
schoolmaster in Oxfordshire, who was so great a mistress of Greek 
and Latin that she could readily speak these languages. Her 
pupil read the classic authors in their respective originals, when 
be was but eleven years of age. He was afterward under the can 
of Mr. Locke, who was principally concerned in his education. 

" Memoirs of itif Peers of En|lud ," fcj 



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OF ENGLAND. 201 

Lord Ashley, who became earl of Shaftesbury upon the death of 
his lather in 1682-3, died Nov. 10, 1699,* and was buried at Win- 
borne, St. Giles. 

He married Dorothy, daughter to John, earl of Rutland ; and 
by' her had issue three sons, Anthony, John, and Maurice; and 
four daughters. Lady Frances, married to Francis Stonehouse, of 
Hungerford-park, in the county of Berks, esq. ; Lady Elizabeth, 
wife of James Harris, of Salisbury, esq. ; and died 1744; Lady 
Dorothy, married to Edward Hooper, of Hern-court, in the county 
of Southampton, and of Boveridge, in the county of Dorset, esq. ; 
and died in 1749 ; and Gertrude, who died 1704, unmarried. 



BARONS. 

ROBERT, lord BROOKE, baron Brooke, of created 
Beauchamp's-court, in the county of Warwick, lord- isso. ' 
lieutenant of the county of Stafford ; obi'U Feb. 13, 
1676: G. Vaicksc. 1678; large h. sh. 

This nobleman was son of Robert Grevile, lord Brooke (who was 
killed at Lichfield), by Catharine, daughter of Francis, earl of Bed- 
ford. He was instrumental in the restoration of Charles II. and 
was one of the six lords sent by the House of Commons to present 
the humble invitation and supplication of the parliament, "That 
his majesty would be pleased to return, and take the government 
of the kingdom into his hands." — Lord Brooke was appointed lord- 
lieutenant of the county of Stafford, and city of Lichfield, Aug. 20, 
1660; and constituted recorder of Warwick for life, in a new charter 
granted to that corporation ; which office his predecessors, Fulke, " 

• Drydcn, in his character of the lord -chancellor Shaftesbury, speaks with great 
contempt of Lord Ashley : 

" Bankrupt of life, and prodigal of eaw : 
And all to leave what with hja toil he won, 
To that unfeather'd two-legg'd thing a son." 

Here the poet evidently alludes to Diogenes'i cock, with the feather] plucked off, 
which he called " Plato'i Man;" namely, J«« Kwtvr, ivnja; anirnoJ bipti, imptumi. 
Vide " Diog. Laert." Edit. Hen. Staph, p. 813. 
TOI.. IV. 2 a 



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202 BIOGRAPHICAL BISTORT 

first lord Brooke, Robert lord Brooke, has faker, and the Earl rf 
Bedford, his uncle (during the minority of hi* brother Francis), 
had held before him. He mi likewise chosen high-stewent of 
Stafford, and Stratford -apon-ATon; and coatribwted ranch to the 
embellishment of Warwick Castle, by fitting wp the stal e aaa ihaest 
there, at a considerable expense, and in a manner anted to the bale 
of the times in which he lived. He married Anne, daughter, ass 
at hut sole hair, to John Doddington, eaq. son and heir of Sir 
William Doddington, of Bremer, in the county of Sunlhamplss; 
by whom ha had lii sons, John, Francis, Charles, Robert, Wilkes, 
and Falke, who ell died young ; and two daughter* , Anne, married 
to William, earl of Kingston ; and Doddington, to Charles, earl, 
and afterward duke, of Manchester. He died at Bath, Feb. 17, 
1676 ; and leaving no male issue, was succeeded in honour sad 
estate by his youngest brother, Fulke, fifth lord Brooke, who *ai 
(soon after the death of his brother) chosen recorder of Warwick; 
and upon the renewal of the charter of that corporation, was therein 
constituted recorder for life. 

" JOHN, lord BELASYSE (or Bellasyse*), baron 
of Worlaby, during the late wars, lieu tenant- genera! 
of the counties of York, Nottingham, Lincoln, and 
Derby ; governor of the city of York and garrison of 
Newark, and captain-general of his majesty's horse- 
guards to King Charles I.; late captain-general of the 
forces in Africa, and governor of Tangier ; lord lieute- 
nant of Ethe ast- Riding of Yorkshire ; governor o! 
Hull, and captain of the guard of gentlemen-pen- 
sioners to his present majesty, King Charles II." 
M. sua 20. Vandyckp. (Reg. Car. I.) R. White x. 
engraved in the manner of Lombards half lengths. 

John, lord BeUasyse, second son of Thomas, lord viscount Fal- 
conberg, raised six regiments for Charles I. in the civil war; and wu 
an officer of distinction at the battles of Edge-hill, New bury,andN«se- 
by, and at thesiegesof Reading and Bristol. He fought with his usutl 

• Hb Dime li mmelinnij spelt Brllmis, but ii more propel!; written BdlssvK. 



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OF ENGLAND. 203 

ralour at the battle of Selby, and bravely defended the garrison of 
Newark against, the English and Scottish armies ; and, in considers 
lion of bis conduct and courage in many gallant actions in the tine 
if the rebellion, waa by King Charles I. created Lord Bellasyse, of 
Worlaby, in the county of Lincoln, by letters-patent, bearing date at 
Oxford, Jan. 27, 1644-5. He was likewise by the same king made 
lieutenant-general of the counties of York, Nottingham, Lincoln) 
and Derby ; governor of the city of York, and captain of the gar- 
rison of Newark-upon- Trent ; as also captain, general of his majesty's- 
guards. . . 

By King Charles II. he was constituted captain-general of his 
forces in Africa, and held many important posts ; but professing 
the Romish religion, resigned bis employments upon passing the 
test act, in ]673.» 

A very lofty and costly monument, of curious workmanship, 
stands affixed to the east wall of the church, in the chnrch-yazd of 
St. Giles-in-the- Fields, Middlesex; on which, above the sarco- 
phagus, is his lordship's coat of arms, impaling those of Powlett; 
and on the base the foil owing, inscription: 

" This monument was erected in the year of our Lord, 1736, by 
the pious direction of the Honourable Dame Barbara Webb, wife of 
Sir John Webb, of Cunford Magna, in the county of Dorset, bait, 
and the Honourable Catharine Talbot, wife of the Honourable John ' 
Talbot, of Longford, in the county of Salop, esq. surviving daughters 
and coheirs of the Right Honourable John, lord Bellasyse, second 
son of Thomas, lord viscount Falconberg, in memory of their most 
dear father, his wives and children. 

" Who for his loyalty, prudence, and courage, was promoted to 
several commands of great trust by their majesties, King Charles I. 
and II. ; via. having raised six regiments of horse and foot in the late 
civil wars, he commanded a tertia in his majesty's armies at the 
battles of Edge-hill, Newbury, andNaseby; at the sieges of Read- 
ing and Bristol ; and afterward, being made governor of York, and 
commander-in-chief of all his majesty's forces in Yorkshire, be 
fought the battle of Selby with the Lord Fairfax ; and being lieute r 
nant-general of the counties of Lincoln, Nottingham, Derby, and 

• Titus Oates, in hit "Narrative of the pretended Plot," 1678, mentions this 
nobleman u deeply concerned in exciting ■ rebellion. This occasioned hit im- 
prisonment in the Tower, where he remained in durance till the a 
James II. 



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204 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

Rutland, and governor of Newark, be valiantly defended that gar- 
rison against tbe English and Scotch armies, till his majesty came in 
person to the Scotch quarters, and commanded the surrender of it. 
At which time he also had the honour of being general of the king's 
horse-guards ; in all which services, during; the wars, and other 
atcbieTemenW, be deported himself with eminent courage and con- 
duct, and received many wounds, sustained three imprisonments in 
the Tower of London ; and after the happy restoration of King 
Charles II. he was made lord- lieu tenant of tbe East-Riding of tbe 
county of York, governor of Hull, general of bis majesty's forcer 
in Africa, governor of Tangier, captain of his majesty's gnard of 
gentleman-pensioners, and first lord-commissioner of the treasury in 
King Junes II. He died the 10th of September, 1689, whose re- 
mains are deposited in this vault. 

"He married, to his first wife, Jane, daughter and sole heiress of 
Sir Robert Boteler, of Woodball, in the county of Hertford, bit. 
by whom he had Sir Henry fiellasyse,* knight of the most honoura- 
ble order of the Bath, interred in this vault; Mary, viscountess 
Dunbar, and Frances, both deceased. 

" He married, to his second wife, Anne, daughter and coheir to 
Sir Robert Crane, of Chilton, in the county of Suffolk, bart who 
also lies interred here. 

" He married, to bis third wife, the Right Honourable the lad; 
Anne Powlett, second daughter of the Right Noble John, marquis 
of Winchester, sister to Charles, late duke of Bolton, and is here 
interred." 

On the sarcophagus, above the said inscription, is the following 
account of his progeny by his last lady : 

" The Right Honourable John, lord Bcllasyse, had issue, by h» 
third marriage with the Lady Anne Powlett, three sons and nine 
daughters, whereof three sons and five of the daughters died in 
their infancy ; Honora, lady dowager Bergavenny, widow and relict 
of George, lord Bergavenny, one of the coheirs of the said John, 
lord Bellasyse, who died without issue the 6th of January, 1706,sjid 
is interred in this vault. 

" The Honourable Dame Barbara Webb, and the Honourable 
Catharine Talbot, the two surviving daughters and coheirs, now 
living, who caused this monument to be erected. 

* Thii Sir Henry married Anne, second daughter of Francis, lord Brndciieli, W 



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OF ENGLAND. 205 

" Alio the Honourable Isabella, the youngest daughter, who mar- 
ied Thomas Stonar, of Stonar, in the county of Oxon, esq. one of 
he coheirs of the said late Lord Bellasyse, and died without issue 
he 4th of June, 1 704." 

CHARLES, lord GERARD, of Brandon, gentle- 
man of the bed-chamber to his sacred majesty, and 
captain of his majesty's horse-guards, &c. 1666. 
W. Sherwinsc. sh. 

Charles, lord Gerard, who descended from the very ancient Created 
family of Geraldine, or Fitzgerald, in Ireland, raised a regiment of 21 CuI - 
foot, and a troop of horse, for Charles I. in the civil war. He 
fought in many battles with the ardour of a volunteer, and displayed, 
at the same time, all the conduct of a veteran. He particularly 
signalized himself in Wales, where he took the fortresses of Car- 
digan, Emblin, Langhorne, and Roche ; as also the strong town of 
Haver ford- West, with the castles of Picton and Carew, He had 
two brothers and several uncles, who had commands in the royal 
army. Ratcliffe Gerard, one of his uncles, had three sons, who all 
fought for the king at the battle of Edge-hill. He was one of the 
lords who presented the Duke of York, as a popish recusant, at 
the King's Bench bar, in Westminster-hall.* He was created Earl 
of Macclesfield, July 23, 1679, and died Jan. 7, 1693-4. 

DENZIL HOLLES, baron Holies. White sc. 
Frontispiece to his " Memoirs," 1699 ; 8vo. 

Dekzil, baron Holies, of Ifield; Mt. 78, 1676; 
Ravenet sc. In the " Historical Collections relating to 
the Families of Cavendish, Vere, Harley, and Ogle; 
by Arthur Collins" 1752; fol,. 

There is a portrait of him at Welbeck. 

Denzil, lord Holies, second son of John, the first earl of Clare, Crested 
was one of the most distinguished of the popular leaders in the i3 C „ jr 
ieign of Charles I. His courage, which was very extraordinary, 

• See Birch') " Life of Tillotson," aeconil edit. p. 78. 



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206 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

wu constitutional, and proceeded from a principle inherent iota 
family. Ilia patriotism, which was as extraordinary and as aeon 
as hia courage, seemed to proceed from as fixed a principle. la 
the part which he acted against Charles, with whom he bad for- 
merly lived in great intimacy, be appears not to hare been iufln- 
enced by personal hatred, party animosity, or the common mouVei 
of interest or ambition. He acted from a much nobler motive thu 
any of these, an inviolable attachment to tie liberties of ku eomtry. 
He had long entertained a jealousy of tbe prerogative ; and there- 
fore, in the last parliament of James I., sided wi the party that 
opposed the court. This jealousy was much increased in the licit 
reign ; and he entered, with his usual spirit, into all those measures 
that he thought necessary to reduce the power of the kiss; within 
bounds, and became a leader of the Presbyterian party, as be be- 
lieved it to be on tbe side of liberty. He was greatly alarmed upon 
teeing Cromwell at the head of die Independents ; and Cromwell 
was little less alarmed at seeing so able a chief at the head of the 
Presbyterians. He was, by the Independent faction, impeached of 
high-treason, which occasioned his flying into France." He was 
employed in several embassies after the restoration, when he re- 
tained the same jealousy for liberty. He refused the insidious 
presents offered him by Lewis XIV. with as much disdain as he 
bad before refused 5000/. offered him by the parliament, to in- 
demnify him for his losses in the civil war.* Ob. 1679-80, Xt. 81. 

SIR MARMADUKE LANGDALE, the 6rst Lord 

Langdale ; mtzz. ( W. Humphry) fee. from the original 
at Holme on Spalding-more, 1774 ; Svo. 

Marmaduke Langdale, descended from an ancient family of 
York, was .knighted by King Charles I. 1627. He .was esteemed 

* If the reader candidly considers the situation of the patriotic, or popular p«rly, 
with regard (o France, in tbe year 1679, ho will be inclined -to think that Loci 
HulJia, how much soever Barillon, (he French ambassador,- might flatter himself, 
was far from being cordially in the iiilere.it of Lewis XIV. at it Hood in opposition 
to that of his own country, t But granting all that is said of him by thi) miiiiter 
to be true, he aeemi to have been the last and the least corrupted of the patriots. 

t See Dalrymple'a - Mcmoira," vol. ii. ar 
•aid of him with the tenour of his conduct. 
Lord RuiaiLL. 



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OF ENGLAND. 20? 

i serious and wise nan, and a good scholar. In the early part of 
lis life he was attached to the liberties of the subjects, but after. 
rard, was as zealous in his majesty's service, and distinguished 
liroself bj his valour and good conduct. The Duke of Hamilton, 
vith the Scotch army, being defeated at Preston by Cromwell, Sir 
Marm ad tike was taken prisoner ; he effected his escape, and retired 
tbroad, loyally attending King Charles II. in his exile, by whom 
ie was created Baron Langdale of Holme, in the county of York, 
1658. He returned at the restoration, having lost 16,000'. without 
my other recompense, than the consciousness of having suffered in 
a good cause. He-died at Holme, 1661. 

FRANCIS, first Lord SEYMOUR, of Trow- 
bridge ; from the collection of the Right Hon. the Earl 
of Egremont. Piatt sc. In Adolphuss " British Cabi- 
net ,-"■ Ato. ■ 

Sir Francis Seymour was the third son of Edward, lord viscount 
Beauchamp, son and heir of Edward, earl of Hertford, and younger 
brother to William, duke of Somerset, who was restored to that title 
(which had been previously forfeited) by the kindness of King 
Charles II. 

Sir Francis was a man of interest aud reputation In the country, 
where he principally resided, and highly esteemed for his know- 
Ledge in rural affairs, and equitable administration of justice to the 
people. In the beginning of the long parliament he was returned 
knight of the sbire for Wilts; and, as he did not adopt those vio- 
lences which distinguished some members of the House of Com- 
mons, and having a great friendship for the Earl of Strafford, he 
Was, by his interposition, called up to the House of Lords in the 16th 
year of King Charles's reign, by the title of Baron Seymour of Trow- 
bridge, On the trial of Strafford, Lord Seymour distinguished him- 
self by refusing to yield to those reasons which induced the bishops 
and several lords, who could have done that unfortunate nobleman 
material service, to wave their right of sitting in judgment. 

When the disputes between the king and parliament were in- 
flamed to their greatest height, Lord Seymour was a constant ad- 
herent to the royal cause. He followed the king to York, and was 
one of the commissioners named by him, on the treaty at Uxbridge. 

On the restoration of Charles II. his loyalty did not pass un- 



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208 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORT 

noticed. He wai made a priry-ccniriMDor, and, on die Id of 
June, 1660, constituted chancellor of the duchy of Lancaster. 

Lord Seymour was twice married ; first to Frances, daughter of 
Sir Gilbert Prinne, by whom he had a son and a daughter; and 
afterward to Catharine, daughter of Sir Robert Lee, of Bdaley.m 
Warwickshire, by whom he bad no issue. He died July 12, 1664, 
and wat buried at Bed win, Wilts. 



SCOTCH NOBILITY. 

JOHN, duke of Lauderdale. Lely p. Hottbrakcntc. 
1740. In the collection of the Earl of Dysert. Ilhttt. 
Head. 

John, duke of Lauderdale. Riley p. Becketfh.sk. 

John, duke of Lauderdale ; robes of the Garter. 
Valck sc. 

The Duke and Dutchess of Lauderdale. Lelyp- 
ion cvc. sk. mezz. 



The Duke and Dutchess of Lauderdale; Svo. 
B. Reading sc. 

John, duke of Lauderdale.. Ryland; in Smollett. 

The original picture is in an apartment belonging to the Earl of 
Breadalbane, in Holy rood -house. 
Created The Duke of Lauderdale, who had been employed in several 

duke, 1672. treaties in the late reign, and had been a sufferer in the cause of 
Charles II. was highly in favour with that prince. He was .thought, 
before the restoration, and especially during his imprisonment after 
the battle of Worcester, to have had some sense of religion; but 
his conduct afterward was utterly inconsistent with every social 
and religious principle. He taught the king the political maxim of 
"neglecting his friends, and making friends of his enemies." His 
whole system of politics was much of the same cait. Whea ho 



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OF ENGLAND. 200 

was high-commissioner in Scotland, he enslaved his country by 
'very mode of oppression : he loaded it with taxes, ruined its trade, 
plundered its inhabitants, and persecuted its religion. When the 
people were grown mad by his cruelty, he obstructed the course 
of justice, and blocked up every avenue to the throne. He was 
one of those who were employed in forging chains for the English, 
and who will ever be remembered by the name of the Cabal. He 
was servile and imperious, haughty and abject ; was a man of great 
learning, but awkward and ungainly in speech and behaviour. He 
practised all the arts of cunning and dissimulation to gain power, 
and was the barefaced tyrant after be had gained it. Ob, 24 Aug. 
1682, S.t. 68. 

JOHN LESLIE, duke of Rothes, from the original 
of Sir P. Lely, m the collection of the Right Honourable 
the Earl of Rothes. C. Picart sc. in Lodge's " Por- 
traits of Illustrious Personages of Great Britain" folio, 
quarto, and octavo. 

The Duke of Rothes was the only son of John Leslie, fifth earl 
of Rothes, by' Anne, second daughter of John Erskine, eighth earl 
of Mar. He was born in the year 1630, and succeeded to the titles 
and estates of his ancestors in the eleventh year of his age. The 
loss of his parents, for his mother also had died in the preceding 
year, was a misfortune,- the effects of which attended him through 
life ; for having been early betrothed to the eldest daughter of the 
Earl of Crawford, he went soon alter his father's death to live in 
that nobleman's family, where his education was almost wholly neg- 
lected. In 1650, he took up his residence, with becoming splendour, 
at Leslie, the mansion of his forefathers; and on the arrival of Charles 
the Second in Scotland, from his exile in Holland, was among the 
first to wait on that Prince, to whose favour the fidelity and impor- 
tant services of his father to the late king had given him peculiar 
pretensions. But Charles, who had at this period only compliments 
to bestow, gave him the sword of state to carry at the coronation, 
which took place in that country on the first of the following Ja- 
nuary. 

In the succeeding month, the Scottish parliament having resolved 
to raise an army for the restoration of the monarchy, this young 
nobleman equipped from his dependants, in the county of Fife, a 

VOL. IV. 2 E " 

D.gilzedbyGOOglC 



210 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

regiment of horse, at the head of which be accompanied Chute* to 
Worcester, where, in the unfortunate battle of the third at Septem- 
ber, 1651 , he fell into the hand* of the rebels, and was sent a pri- 
soner, with tome others of the nobility of his country, to the Tower of 
London. There, at Newcastle-upon-Tyne, and in some other placet, 
he remained in strict custody till the summer of 1655, when ELn- 
beth Murray, countess of Dysart, a woman not less remarkable for bet 
in triguing spirit than for her beauty, and one of the few towards whom 
Cromwell is said to have betrayed an amorous inclination, procured 
his release through her influence over the usurper, and be was per- 
mitted to return to Scotland. He remained there unmolested rill the 
beginning of January, 1658, when, probably on some political sus- 
picions, but professedly to prevent the consequences of a private 
quarrel, he was imprisoned in Edinburgh Castle, and in the following 
spring his estates were sequestrated. These hardships, operating 
on a disposition in which loyalty might be said to hare been almost 
natural, riveted his attachment to the royal cause. He was libe- 
rated in December, 1658, and suffered to retire to his own house, 
where he remained till the design for the restoration became publicly 
rumoured, when he fled to the king at Breda, and remained with 
him till that great event occurred. 

In addition to his affection to the crown, and to the family which 
held it, his resolution in executing bis master's commands was as 
remarkable as his invariable obedience to them. Charles, even be- 
fore the restoration, seems to have determined to intrust to him the 
chief management of the affairs of Scotland. On the first of June, 
1661, he was appointed president of the council in that country, and 
one of the four lords extraordinary of tbe session, and was consti- 
tuted the king's high commissioner to the parliament which met af 
Edinburgh, on the 18th of June in the following year. The staff of 
high treasurer, which had been held by Crawford, bis father-in-law, 
was presently afterwards delivered to him, with the singular accom- 
paniment of commissions of general of the forces, and captain of 
the troop of horse-guards; and in the summer of 1663, he was no- 
minated to the office of keeper of the privy-seal. 

Certain it is, that he earned these excessive favours, if not by < 
sacrifice of all public principle, at least by a most reprehensible duc- 
tility. He was largely concerned in procuring that extravagant bill 
of the year 1661, called by the Scots " the Act Recissory," by which 
all the parliaments that had been held in Scotland since 1 633, were 
declared illegal, and all their proceedings annulled. This frightful 



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OF ENGLAND. 211 

leasure, which, however pregnant of general confusion and inis- 
hief, aimed only at the overthrow of the Kirk, was concerted with 
he furious Sharp, Archbishop of St. Andrews, to whom, with re- 
>pect to ecclesiastical affairs, Rothes seems in a great measure to 
iave devoted himself. From a ministerial opponent he presently 
legenerated into a persecutor. The military were scattered in those 
)arts of the country in which the covenanters abounded; the parish 
priests were directed to transmit lists of such as avoided the csta- 
jliahed worship, to the general, Sir James Turner, and they were 
forced into the churches at the point of the bayonet. Turner, though 
a most obedient soldier, and naturally rough and furious, was fre- 
quently reprehended by him for acting too mildly with them. The 
covenanters resented these outrages by an insurrection so ill con- 
certed, and so weakly supported by any persons of power, that they 
were discomfited on their first appearance in arms. Rothes, who 
was then at the court, and who had persuaded the king, perhaps be- 
lieving it himself, that all but a few obstinate fanatics had submitted, 
on receiving the news posted into Scotland, with intentions suffi- 
ciently vindictive, which, however, were fomented to the utmost on 
his arrival, by the influence ef the primate. About fifty of the insur- 
gents, who were mostly of the lowest class, were put to death; many 
fled to Ireland; the more moderate covenanters sullenly obeyed, 
and abandoned their conventicles ; and a miserable calm, simply the 
effect of terror, succeeded. It was evident, however, that a state of 
order so procured could not be long maintained, and the remedy 
was obvious. Two" of the independent nobility, members of the 
established church, went to London, and represented to the king 
with firmness the state of the country, and the causes of the evils 
under which it suffered, and besought him to dismiss the ministers 
to whom they ascribed them. 

Charles was moved by their arguments, and dispatched an order 
to Scotland, that the primate should be restrained from going to 
Edinburgh, and confined to his diooess; but he hesitated as to Rothes, 
for whom he entertained a real friendship. Such indeed was that 
nobleman's influence over bis mind, or such his own secret affection 
to the measures that he was requested to relinquish, that, even while 
he seemed to give way to the councils of those lords, a letter from 
the earl prevailed on him to empower the Scottish privy -council to 
require all whom they suspected ta.be enemies to the church to re- 
nounce the covenant, and to proceed against such as refused it as 
traitors; directing, however, by a. private order that such power should 



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212 BIOGRAPHICAL BISTORT 

not be exercised to the utmost, but by hi* special co» m » J u»d, 6rru**r 
than Tor the purpose of exciting tenor in the cootnnciovax. Bj a 
second, and bolder, suggestion to the king, at the sane critical pe- 
riod, he seemed to render the overthrow of his own anlbority inevit- 
able, inasmuch as it drew down on him the resentment of the whale 
body of the nobility. He charged a majority of die psrry-cowaeu 
with disaffection to the church, and proposed that a special council 
should be nominated to sit at Glasgow on ecclesiastical sftairs, awl 
to far was he from concealing this imprudent advice that he avowed 
it even to the earl of Lauderdale, who was not only a proteased cove- 
nanter, but his known enemy. In the mean time the two Scottish 
peers, who yet remained in London, redoubled their efforts against 
him ; but the king still paused, when an accident is said to have pro- 
duced the crisis to which those endeavours had been hitherto vainly 
applied . A division of the Dutch fleet, which in 1 667 sailed np (he 
Thames, was directed to enter the Frith of Forth ; to threaten aa 
attack, by way of feint, on the Scottish coast ; and then secretly to 
join De Ruyter, in that well-known enterprise. A great consterna- 
tion was excited in that part of the country, but the matter ended in 
the discharge of a few innocent shot against the works at Brunt- 
islond. Rothes happened to be then on a progress in the north, and 
not only the danger which it was pretended had menaced Scotland 
was charged by his enemies on his absence, which was represented 
as gross negligence, but even the subsequent insult, which tarnished 
for a time the naval glory of England, was in some measure ascribed 
to the same cause. 

Charles at length consented to deprive him of the immoderate 
power with which he had been invested, and which he had exercised 
with so much indiscretion and, indeed, tyranny ; this, however, was 
accomplished gradually, and with all possible mildness, for the king 
had determined to dismiss him with no signs of disgrace. The 
army, contrary to his advice, was first disbanded) by which his 
commission of general was reduced to a mere title. Rothes now 
flew to the court, besought the aid of the Duke of Monmouth, who 
had married his niece, and condescended to apply himself even to 
Lauderdale ; but it was too late. He was presently deprived of the 
treasury, but with a special approbation, under the great seal, of his 
conduct in that post. The rest of his offices followed, except only 
that of the privy-seal, which he held for many years after. And now 
came the counterpoise, in Rothes's mind very unequal, to these se- 
vere mortifications: in the month of October, 1667, shortly befose 



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O.P ENGLAND. 213 

rhicfa time these alterations had occurred, he was placed for fife in 
he dignified, ratbcr than powerful, station of high chancellor of 
Scotland. 

From that period he had scarcely any ostensible concern in the 
government of the country. Charles's attachment to him, however, 
euiained unaltered; and there is little reason to doubt that he was 
ecrctly consulted to the last on the affairs of Scotland. The 
i tr on g est proof of his master's esteem was yet to come. On the 
29th of May, 1680, he was created Duke of Rothes, and Marquis 
jf Ballinbrcich, to which were added several other titles of peerage, 
with remainder to his heirs male, of which, though at that time he 
inly had daughters, he was Dot of an age to despair; but he survived 
the acquisition of these new dignities little more than one year. He 
died at Holyrood House, on the 27th of July, 1681, and was buried 
at Leslie, with an extravagance of pomp, scarcely every equalled in 
tl>e funeral of a subject ; so remarkable indeed as to have been com- 
memorated by an engraving, specially for that purpose. 

The Duke of Rothes married Anne, daughter of John Lindsay, 
aerl of Crawford and Lindsay, by whom he had two daughters, 
Margaret and Christian : the dukedom, of course, died with him. 
The elder of these ladies, who became the wife of Charles Hamilton, 
fifth earl of Haddington, succeeded to the titles of Countess of 
Rothes, &c. and from her the present earl is descended; the second 
married, first, James, third marquis of Montrose; secondly, Sir John 
Bruce, of Kinross, baronet. 



JAMES, earl of Perth, &c. M. 31, Wm. Faithorne 
ad vivum del. et sc. 

" James, earl of Perth ; lord Drummond and Stob- 
hall ; lord justice-general of the kingdom of Scot- 
land ; one of the extraordinary lords of the session ; 
and one of the lords of his majesty's most honour- 
able privy-council in that kingdom ;" 1683, JEt. 34. 
Kneller p. R. White sc. h.sk. 

The inscription of this print has been altered, both as to his age 
and preferments. This was done when he was made lord high- 
chancellor of Scotland, in 1684. See the next reign. 



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214 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

THOMAS, earl of Elgin, JEt. 62, 1062. Faithorne 
sc. h.sh.- lief ore his " Funeral Sermon." 

There ia a portrait of him at Dunham, the seat of the late Eiri 
of Warrington, and now of Earl of Stamford. 

This nobleman was brother, and successor in honour and estate, 
' to Edward, lord Bruce, who was killed in a duel by Sir Edward 
Sackrillc, afterward earl of Dorset. He attended Charles I. at his 
coronation in Scotland, when he was created earl of Elgin. Re 
was also created Baron Bruce, of Wharlton, in the county or 
York, 17 Car. f. He was a roan of uncommon parts, and of a 
good domestic character. The delicacy of his constitution, which 
was hectic, prevented him from interesting himself in the admi- 
nistration of public affairs, for which he was well qualified by bis 
natural and acquired abilities. He was the first in descent from 
Mary, queen of France, youngest daughter of Henry VII. His 
son Robert was created earl of Ailesbury. 06. 21 Dec. 1663, 
£t. 63. 

WILLIAM KERR, third earl of Lothian, from the 
original of Jamieson, in the collection of the Most Noble 
the Marquis of Lothian. H. Meyer sc. In Lodges 
" Portraits of Illustrious Personages of Great Britain" 
folio, quarto, and octavo. 

William Kerr, third earl of Lothian, was the eldest son of Sir 
Robert Kerr, created earl of Ancram in 1633, by Elizabeth, daugh- 
ter of Sir John Murray, of Blackbarony ; but the earldom, which 
had been settled first on the fruit of his father's second marriage 
with Anne, daughter of William Stanley, sixth earl of Derby, ami 
widow of Sir Henry Portman, of Orchard, in Somersetshire, failing;, 
on the death of Charles, the only son by the second marriage, it 
reverted to this nobleman, whose lineal descendant, the present 
Marquis of Lothian, now enjoys it. William, though third ear) of 
Lothian of his family, did not inherit that dignity. He had mar- 
ried Anae Kerr, countess of Lothian in her own right, daughter 
and heir to the second earl; a lady of his own blood, but most dis- 
tant kindred, and the honour was therefore conferred on him by a 
new patent, on the 31st of July, 1631. 

This earl, the chief care of whose parents had been to fix in his 



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OP ENGLAND. 215 

nind, even from his infancy, an attachment to monarchial govern- 
pent, and an affectionate veneration towards the person of the 
signing king, became, by a strange perverseness, perhaps the most 
incere and bitter enemy among his countrymen to both. In this 
louble rebellion, however, at once against his father and his prince, 
le had the merit at least of consistency, for his fidelity to the canse 
vhich he had espoused was invariable, and even unsuspected, and 
nis motives wholly disinterested ; and hence, rather than from his 
alents, which were not of the highest class, he possessed the entire 
confidence of his party. He appeared in 1638 among the most 
vehement of the covenanters, and was in the following year nomi- 
nated, with thirteen others, to manage the deceitful and vexatious 
treaty then offered by them to Charles, at Berwick. In 1640, he 
had a command in the Scottish army which invaded England ; was 
present at the siege of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, which was the only 
exploit worth naming in the expedition; and on the reduction of that 
town was appointed governor of it by the party which then ruled in 
Scotland. He was soon after named one of the four commissioners 
of the Scottish treasury ; and in 1641 was placed at the head of a 
deputation of trusty covenanters, 'who were sent to London to offer 
to the parliament a Scottish army to serve against the Irish rebels, 
and to procure from that assembly an engagement to maintain such 
troops as might be raised for that purpose. This agreement, which 
had indeed been previously made, and whieh had deeper views than 
the proposed expedition, was presently confirmed. The army was 
levied, and Lothian, to whom the command of a regiment was 
given, sailed with it to Ireland, where he seems to have done nothing 
worth recording. 

In the autumn of 1646 he was placed at the head of a com- 
mission, under the authority and direction . of which himself and 
some others waited on the king, then in the hands of the Scottish 
army, to exhort him to accede to the last bitter propositions offered 
to him by the rebel parliament in England, which, as is well known, 
Charles positively and magnanimously refused. The surrender of 
that prince's person, by the traitors who then governed Scotland, 
speedily followed. Lothian, who had been a willing party to that 
infamous measure, and had protested in parliament against a late 
feeble effort of doubtful loyalty, which is known in the Scottish 
history by the name of " The Duke of Hamilton's engagement," 
was now appointed secretary of state, in the room of that noble- 
man's brother, the earl of Lanerick, who soon after fled to Holland. 



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21C BIOGRAPHICAL IIISTORY 

In the mean time tbe close of Charles's miseries approached. A 
treaty, however, still subsisted between him and his House of Com- 
mons, whose authority, now little less shorn than his own, the 
leaders of the covenant faction had resolved to support to their 
utmost ; nor were they less anxious to deceive the world into a 
milder opinion of their late treachery towards the king, by some 
public expression of their horror and resentment of the extremities 
to which he was reduced by the new military usurpation. With 
these views, as Lord Clarendon informs us, " The Earl of Lothian, 
and two others, who were known to be most zealous for the cove- 
nant, ami most enraged and incensed against the proceedings of 
the army, were made choice of, and presently sent away, that they 
might make all possible baste to Westminster, and were, immedi- 
ately upon their arrival, to demand permission to wait upon the 
king, wherever he should be, and to receive from him such farther 
directions as he should judge necessary for his service." They had 
scarcely arrived in London when Cromwell marched his army 
thither; dispersed in a moment the frantic and iniquitous assembly, 
which had for some years usurped the name aud authority of a 
parliament, and erected his "high-court of justice" for the con 
demnation of the king. 

The troubles of Lothian's commission was considerably narrowed 
by these events. He had been directed to flatter this nominal par- 
liament; to amuse the unhappy Charles with new deceptions; and 
to enter a cold dissent, should circumstances render it necessary, 
from any resolution of violence against the royal person. A large 
abstract of his instructions, displaying a turpitude of various trea- 
chery, inconsistent even with the fraud and apathy of the vilest 
diplomatic negociations recorded in history, has been preserved 
by Lord Clarendon. Nothing, however, now remained to be done 
but to make the protestation against the sacrifice of the king, which 
was not presented till he had been twice dragged before the tribu- 
nal by which he was to be judged, and was couched in terms 
which scarcely maintained even the affectation of sincerity. The 
remnant of a legislature, which Cromwell had permitted to subsist, 
partly understood the spirit which had dictated this profession, and 
having first murdered the king, returned to Lothian such an an- 
swer as they thought would be agreeable to the persons by whom 
he had been sent, as well as to himself, who, as Lord Clarendon in- 
forms us, " had upon all occasions carried the rebellion highest, and 
shewed the most implacable malice to the person of the king." 



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OF ENGLAND. 217 

But, however welcome the treason, some pohitsin the reply of 
the traitors were little relished by Lothian and his brethren : they 
were told plainly that the government of England was to be 
strictly republican, and almost as plainly, that it was intended to 
compel Scotland to adopt the same system. The constitution of 
Scotland, a monarchy with Few limitations, had remained untouched; 
and the covenanters, far from aiming at the destruction of the regal 
character, looked forward with hope to the authority of the young 
king, as an instrument which they might easily bend to the accom- 
plishment of all their purposes. The commissioners therefore re- 
joined, in a tone which gave much offence ; and their English friends, 
having neither time nor inclination to expostulate farther with them, 
and foreseeing some probable inconvenience, from the liberty of 
persons of such condition disposed to argue for loyalty, shut them 
up without ceremony, nor were they released till the arrival of a 
remonstrance from Scotland, when they were sent to Gravesend, 
strictly guarded, and embarked there for their own country. 

Of Lothian, we have no farther intelligence after this period, 
than that he was dispatched to Breda by the "Parliament in the 
beginning of the succeeding year, 1650, together with the Earl of 
C as salts and others, to invite Charles the Second to Scotland, on 
the hard conditions, so frequently rejected by his royal father, as 
they now were by himself. 

William, third earl of Lothian, survived till 1675. He had issue 
by his countess, five sons ; Robert, the eldest/who succeeded to the 
dignities, and was in 1701 created marquis of Lothian; Sir Wil- 
liam; Charles, ancestor of the Kerrs ■ of- Abbotsrule; Harry and 
John, who died young. He had also nine daughters ; Anne, wife 
of Alexander Fraser, ' master of Saltoun ; Elizabeth, married' to 
John lord Borthwick ; Jane and Margaret, who died young ; Mary, 
wife of James Brodie, of Brodie; Margaret, married to James 
Richardson, of Smeaton; Vere, to Lord Neil Campbell, second 
son of Archibald, marquis of Argyll ; Henrietta, to Francis Scott, 
of Thirlcstane ; and Lilias, who died unmarried. 



■ JOHN CAMPBELL, earl of Loudon. J. Thane. 

Johan. Com. Loudoun Summus Scotiae Cancel-: 
larius, 1645; in Simon's " Medals," p.. 15. 

VOL. IV. 2 F 



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21* BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORT 

John Campbell, son to Sir James Campbell, of Lawera, Ae 
founder of the House of Lawers, *n, by King ChatLes the First, 
created Earl of Loudon, 1633. Hit lordship was appointed oo»- 
missioner from the covenanters in Scotland, and committed to the 
, Tower for signing a letter written by the Marquis of Montrose, 
offering to put bis country under the protection of the French king, 
provided he would assist the party in their designs. After m few 
months confinement he was released by the interposition of the 
Marquis of Hamilton, and, renewing his professions of duty to the 
king, was appointed lord-chancellor of Scotland, being esteemed the 
most eloquent man of his time. On the defeat of the king at the 
battle of Worcester, he fled to the Highlands, made his peace, and 
died in Obscurity, 1663. 

RICHARDUS, dominus MAITLAND, &c. Kml- 
lerp. Vandrebanc sc. large k. sk. 

Ricardus, dominus Maitland,&c. JEt. 31, 1663. 
Michelin ; P. Vandrebanc. This is the first impression .* 
it was afterward altered to resemble Knelters picture ; 
scarce. 

Richard, earl of Lauderdale. Harding. - 

Richard, &c. V. Bergke. 

Richard, lord Haitland, was eldest eon of Charles, eart of Lau- 
derdale, brother to the high-commisaioner of Scotland.* He was 
lord justice-clerk for that kingdom, to whieh high office he was 
promoted in 1681 : he was also one of the privy-council in this 
reign. He lost bis places for corresponding with the Earl of Argyle, 
who was attainted. This occasioned his flying into France, where 
he translated the " JSneis," which he thoroughly understood as a 
grammarian, or verbal critic. We see the tame, the uninformed 
features of .Virgil in this translation; but he has seldom, if ever, 

* Upon the decease of the higb-commiuionet, the ttUe of Duke became extinct, 

end the dignity of Earl descended to bis brother Charles, Who was succeeded by 
hit ton Ricbiuri, 16*1. . - ■ 



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0-F ENGLAND. 219 

bit the majestic air of that prince of Roman poets: and even where 
the latter has exerted all his fire, his translator is as cold as death. 

" Such u our pride, oat folly, or our fate, - - 

That few bat those who oganot write translate.— Dinh am. 

He died abroad, soon after the revolution. 

GUALTERtJS, Comes de LESLIE, Caesareus ad 
Portam Ottomamcam Orator. A neat whole length, 
holding a truncheon. 

Count* Leslie, a Scotsman, who was able in the cabinet, and 
prudent and intrepid in the field, was, from his exact knowledge of 
men and manners, perfectly skilled in the arts of negotiation. Sir 
Paul Hycaut, in his Dedication of " The present State of the 
Ottoman Empire," informs us, that in his embassy to the Porte) 
he was treated by the Turks with greater distinction and regard 
than they had ever paid to any ambassador, f The same author, 
who was well acquainted with his character, speaks of him in these 
terms ; " To do justice to this worthy person, be hath brought a 
reputation to the British nation above any in out age ; whose vir- 
tues and industry have acquired the highest trusts and preferments 
in foreign parts, and done the same honour to his king, under whom 
he was born a subject, as to the present emperor and his ancestors, 
Under whom he is, and hath always been a faithful minister ; hav- 
ing deserved so eminently for saving the whole German empire 

* He was a count of the empire, and may be placed here, or at die end of this 

t See "A Relation of a Journey of the Right Honourable my Lord Henry 
Howard, from London to Vienna, and thence to Constantinople in the Company of 
tis Excellency Count Lesley, Knight of the Order of Ibe Golden Fleece, Cuort- 
■ellor of Stale to hi? Imperial Majesty, tec. and Extraordinary Ambassador from 
Leopoldna, emperor of Germany, to the Grand Signiur, Saltan Mahomet Hau (lie 
Fourth. By John Burbury, Gent." 1671, 13mo- 

Lord Henry Howard, who was afterward Duke of Norfolk,} began his journey 
in February, 1664, and went' to Constantinople the aarne year. It appears, at 
p. 34, of thia book, that Francis Hay, baron of Delgate, wis nephew to Count 
Leslie. He waa one of the embassy, as was also Mr. Edward Howard, brother to 
Lord Henry. The Earl of Wincbeuca wa» than English ambaattdor at Conataa- 

t Weed's " FmH,*' ii. col. 172. 



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220 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

from the treason of Wauesteiu, by his own single net of bravery (a 
Story notoriously known to all the world), as can never in giatif lc 
be forgot by that nation, nor want its due record and place in the 
history of that country." Lady Mary Wortley Montague, in her 
letter from Peterwaradin,* tells us that Count Lesly laid Belgrade in 
ashes, 1685. It is probable, that, by this exploit, he restored tran- 
quillity to the empire. 
Walter, count Leslie, died March 4th, 1667-8. 



CHARLES SEATON, earl of Dunfermline. Rich- 
ardson; 1796. 

Car. Setonus, &c. in Simon's " Medals," plate XX. 

Charles Seaton, second earl of Dunfermline, who in the begin- 
ning of the civil troubles engaged with the covenanters, was one of 
the committee of parliament, in 1640; and one of the Scotch com- 
missioners appointed to treat with the king for peace, and was ap- 
pointed privy-counsellor for life by the parliament, in 1641. He was 
also one of the committee of estates, from 1644 to 1646 ; bat re- 
turned to his allegiance, and was appointed lord privy-seal, by 
Charles II. in 7116. Ob. 1674. Seethe reign of Charles I. 

JAMES ERSKINE, earl of Buchan ; from an 
original painting in the possession of the Earl of 
Buchan. Trotter sc. 8vo. 

James Erskine, seventh earl of Buchan, succeeded his father 35 
earl of Buchan, in the year 1640. He had a fine of 1000/. imposed 
on him for his loyalty to King Charles the First; but obtained s 
remission by Cromwell's act of grace and pardon in 1654. 

This nobleman greatly improved the paternal estate, being heir to 
his mother, Mary Douglass, countess of Buchan, who died in 1 638, 
and becoming entitled to considerable property in right of Margaret 
Ogilvy, his grandmother, who died April 20, 1630. The same year 
he became heir-general to Patrick Ogilvy, of Auchterhouse, his 
great grandfather. He married Lady Marjory Ramsay, eldest 

* Vel, 1. p. 134. 



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OF ENGLAND. 221 

laughter of William, first earl of Dalbonsie, and by her bad issue, 
iVilliam, eighth earl of Buchan, and four daughters : Lady Mar- 
raret, first married to Fraser of Jnneraluchy, and afterward to 
Charles, fourth lord Fraser ; Lady Anne, married to James 
Danaries, D.D. ; Lady Henrietta, married to Thomas Forbes, of 
rolquhoun; and Lady Jane, married to George Gray, of Halker- 
ton. His lordship died in October, 1664. 



IRISH NOBILITY * 
ROGER, earl of Orrery, &c. J. Mynde sc. Btw. 
Roger, earl of Orrery. Harding. 

Roger, earl of Orrery,! fifth son of Richard, earl of Corke, Created 
merited, as well as hiB father, the appellation of Great. He was Sept. 5, 
great in the cabinet, but much greater in the field; where he acted 
a very capital part, and may deservedly be ranked with our military 
heroes. No man, in these latter ages, has more distinguished him- 
self for cool courage, pregnant invention, and reach of thought 
than he has done, in the very article of difficulty and danger; 
in which none of our countrymen ever equalled him but the great 
Earl of Peterborough, who was altogether as happy in his strata- 
gems and expedients. He, like Atticus, prudently adapted him- 
self to the changes of the times ; but not by a timid and cautious 
conduct, or securing himself by inaction, much less by mean or 
sordid compliances. He was a most useful subject to Charles the 
First, Cromwell, and Charles the Second. He was not great in 
poetry, having written several of his dramatic pieces in the gout, 
the paroxysms of which seem to have occasioned some straining 
and distortion of thought in these compositions. Dryden some- 

* In Gough's ." Anecdotes of Topograph;," p. 636, mention is made of a head 
of Lord Donnegal, by Hullar, in a map of Ennishore (Enishowen), a province in 
Ireland, dated 1667. The person here represented is Arthur Chichester, second 
Earl of Donnegal, and nephew to Arthur the first. { See an account of him in 
Lodge's " Peerage," vol. i. p. 3SS. 

i He often occur* in historj under the title of Lord Broghlll. 

t Created 30 March, 1647. 



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222 BIOGRAPHICAL BISTORT 

where comparer die ifw/"of hi* brain to the cm of Semrfe,** 
god who waa produced io tortwe. Mr. Waljwle, wfco fcaa pww 
■it a detail of bit writing!, obaenrea, that "lie Govt w« a**J 
impotent mine."* His "Art of War," pobEafced im folio, 1677, 
ii a work that doea him honour, and i* well worthy Ae readert 
notice.* He died October 16, 1670, in the ffty-wama year of 
hii age. Hii " State Lettera," together with his Life, dj V* 
chaplain, Mr. Thomaa Morrice, are well worth the notice of tb« 
reader. 

THOMAS, earl of Ossory. Van Hove sc. h. sk. 

Thomas, earl of Ossory; a small oval; mezz. 

Thomas, earl of Ossory. Ravenetsc. Engraved/or 
Carte's " Life of the Duke of Ch-mond ;" fol. 

" Thomas, lord Butler, earl of Ossory, general of 
his majesty's subjects of Great Britain, in the service 
of his highness the Prince of Orange, and the States 
of the United Provinces ; lieutenant-general of h' 
majesty's forces in the kingdom of Ireland ; lord- 
chamberlain to the queen ; one of the lords of his 
majesty's most honourable privy-council, in the 
kingdoms of- England and Ireland ; one of the lords 
of his majesty's bed-chamber; and knight of the 
most noble order of the Garter." Zelj/p. Yandrebm 
sc. sh. 

A pompous list of titles and honours, under the portraits of men 
of rank, sometimes compose the history of the person represented. 

• " Noble Authors," toI. ii. p. 2S9, Id edit. 

t I cannot say so much for hii " Parthenissa," a romance, in folio, which "" 
never completed. The author probably thought tt unfashionable not to exercise tri> 
pen in this species of if riling, which was much in vogne in the reign of Charles !!■ 
When England ap'd the gallantries of France, 
And every flowery courtier wrote romance. 
The greatest work of this kind is " Artamenes, or Ibe Grand Cyrus," which is not 
of a site suitable to the grandeur of its liero. 



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OF ENGLAND. 223 

Here ire have a man who shone with unborrowed lustre, whose 
nerit was the foundation of his fame. Though he seemed born 
"or the camp only, he was perfectly qualified for the court; not as 
i -wit, a mimic, or buffoon, but by a propriety of behaviour, the 
result of good sense and good breeding. His courage on board 
the fleet was scarcely exceeded by that of Prince Rupert and the 
Duke of Albemarle ; and theirs was never exceeded by that of 
any other sea-officer. He commanded the English troops in the 
service of the Prince of Orange; and at the battle ofMons contri- 16T7. 
buted greatly to the retreat of Marshal Luxemburg, to whom 
Lewis XIV. was indebted for the greatest part of his military glory. 
He, on this occasion, received the thanks of the Duke of Villa 
Hermosa, governor of the Spanish Netherlands, and also the thanks 
of his Catholic Majesty himself. His speech, addressed to the 
Earl of Shaftesbury, in vindication of his father, was universally 
applauded ;• it even confounded that intrepid orator, who waa in 
the senate what the Earl of Oesory was in the field. These his 
great qualities were adorned by a singular modesty, and a probity 
which nothing could corrupt. Poets and historians praise him in 
much the same terras, as prose naturally rises to the language of 
poetry on so elevated a subject. He died of a fever, July 30, 1680, 
in the 46th year of his age. The Duke of Ormond, his father, said, 
" that he would not exchange his dead son for any living son in 
Christendom." See Class VII. 



ROGER PALMER, earl of Castlemaine ; in a 
large wig; 12mo. (Faithorne.) 

Roger, earl of Castlemaine. Harding. 

Roger Palmer, earl of Castlemaine ; from an 
original by Kneller, at Strawbetvy Hill, in the " Noble 
Authors," by Park. 

Roger Palmer, husband to Mrs. Palmer, the royal mistress,! 
was, by Charles II. created earl of Castlemaine. A man of nice 
honour would never have accepted of this title, as the whole world 



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224 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

knew on what account it was conferred. It indeed appears that be 
had tome scruple* upon that head, as he did not accept of it when 
it was (ir»t offered him. In 1680 he was accused as an accomphee 
in the Meal-tub Plot, and was brought to a public trial; but nodus* 
was proved against him. He was a good proficient in the mathe- 
matics, and was the inventor of a " horizontal globe," of which he 
wrote an explanatory pamphlet.* He was author of " An Account 
of the present War betwixt the Venetians and the Turks," &c. 1660; 
l'Jmo. and of " A short and true Account of the material Passages 
in the late War betwixt the English and Dutch ;" 1671 ; 12mo. His 
bead is prefixed to both these books. See more of him, and bit 
works, in the " Catalogue of the Royal and noble Authors." See 
also the reign of James II. 



HENRICUS HERUS, haro de Colerane, ftc. 
half-length, standing at a table ; h.sh. Thisprintws 
begun by Faithorne, who engraved the face, wig, and 
neckcloth, and a very small part of the adjoining dra- 
pery; the rest was done by Vertue.-f 

Henry, lord Colerane, with Thomas Killegrev, 
inscribed ** The princely Shepherds." 

Henry, lord Colerane, Mt. 67, 1703 ; mezz. oval; 
VIVIT HERVS. 

Henry Ha re, lord Colerane; in" Noble Authors," 
by Mr. Park. 

. Henry Hare, or Here, lord Colerane ; an anony- 
mous whole length, in a pilgrinCs habit, sitting ad 
writing; Jacob's ladder, with angels ascending andk- 
scending, in a pyramid; a view of Venice at a distance- 
Faithorne sc. h.sh. 



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OF ENGLAND. 225 

The reverend Mr. Lort, late Greek professor at Cambridge, on 
hose authority I rely, informed me that this is the portrait of Lord 
olerane; and that the print is prefixed to Lauredanua's " Ascent 
T the Soul." 

Henry, son of Hugh, the first baron of Colerane, was eminent Created 
>r divine and human literature. He was particularly skilled in lfi*5. , 
iniquities, especially medals, of which he well knew the utility. 
lis family, which ia said to have sprung from a branch of that of 
larcourt, in Lorrain, and to have had its descent from one of the 
format] adventurers who attended the Conqueror, has been noted 
or men of learning. 

Lord Colerane' a publications appear to have been " The Ascent 
if the Soul ; or David's Mount towards God's House : being 
'arfrplirases on the Fifteen Psalms of Degrees. Written in Italian, 
ry the illustrious Gio. Francesco Loredano, a noble Venetian, 
1656; rendered into English, Anno Dom. 1665:" Lond. 1681; fol. 
Before this book is a frontispiece engraved by Faithorne from his 
Lordship's own design : it is an allegorical print of the translator in 
i pilgrim's habit, sitting and writing. The book itself is dedicated 
to the most honoured Luanda, inverse and prose: and at the close 
of the volume are verses superscribed — " The eucharist at Easter, 
1657 ; on the recovery of my most dear and honoured Lucinda." 

" La Scala Santa ; or, a Scale of Devotion, musical and gradual : 
being Descants on the Fifteen Psalms of Degrees in Metre; with 
Contemplations and Collects upon them, in Prose," 1670: 1681; fol. 

ARTHUR CHICHESTER, earl of Donnegal. 
IV. Hollar, 1661 ; a small oval, in a map o/Enishowen : 
in the British Museum ; copied. 

Arthur, the eldest son of Edward, viscount Chichester, was born 
June 16, 1606 ; and July 16, 1625, was appointed captain of the 
first troop or company that should become void ; which happening 
in 1627, by the resignation of the Lord Valentia, he succeeded him 
in the command of fifty horsemen, and was made governor of Car- 
rickfergus for life, after the decease of his father. In 1639, he 
represented the county of Antrim in parliament; in 1640, was cap- 
tain of sixty-three carbineers, with the pay of 1/. 4s. a day, and, by the 
name of Colonel Arthur Chichester, did good service against the 
rebels. . . 

vol. it, 2 a 



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220 IUOGRAPIIICAL HISTORY 

He wat residing at Carrickfergus when the f 
brought thither, on Saturday, October 23, 1641, ahoui test o"dtoct 
at night, of the approach of the rebel*. He immediately, by fire* 
ami alarm drums, raised the country, and the next day (lesrWesgonfy 
fifty miuketeeri, under Captain Roger Lyndon, to guard the castle) 
delivered the rest of the arms, with ammunition, to the coaratry 
people, whom he formed into companies; and on the 25th, with 
about three hundred horse and foot, inarched to Belfast, where he 
was joined by one hundred and fifty men from Antrim. On the 27th, 
he met the Lord Montgomery at Lisburne, whose forces nailed 
were about one thousand horse and foot; and November I, a com 
mission arriving from the Lords Justices and Council, to htm and 
Sir Arthur Tyringham, to command in chief within die county of 
Antrim, and to order and dispose of places according to their dis- 
cretion, they took the best methods in their power for the defence 
of the country, and suppression of the rebellion. 

King Charles, being satisfied of his loyalty and affection, and of 
his good abilities to serve him, constituted him by commission, 
Feb. 14, 1643, governor of Belfast and the territory of Eniahowee, 
forbidding all persons to billet or garrison any soldiers in those 
places, or make any assessments upon the inhabitants, without his 
licence and approbation ; and for the better fortifying of the town 
of Belfast, his majesty directed the lord-lieutenant to advance 10007. 
to him forthwith,— But when, through the defection of the army in 
the north, he could do the king no farther service in those parts, he 
removed to Dublin, where, in December, 1644, he was sworn of the 
privy-council ; and Jan. 2, following, with the rest of the officers of 
the Marquis of Ormond's regiment, resolved not to take the cove- 
nant, then imposed upon them by the English parliament, but to 
preserve their allegiance to his majesty, and obey the orders of his 
lord-lieutenant. 

His fidelity to his prince, affection to his country, and activity 
against the rebels, were so eminent, that the Marquis of Ormond, 
in his letter to the king, Jan. 19, 1645, thus represents him to bis 
majesty : " You have been graciously pleased of late to reward some, 
that have either served your majesty actually, or suffered for you 
eminently in their persons or fortunes, with new creations, or with 
additions of honour in this kingdom. - That Colonel Arthur Chi- 
chester hath missed such a mark of your majesty's favour, I con- 
ceive to have been through hia own modesty, and my not represent- 
ing his personal merit. If he outlives his father, he will be in among 



:ed'l.y GOOgle 



OF ENGLAND. 227 

the foremost of the viscounts of this kingdom in place, and, I am 
sore, beyond them all, except one, in fortune, though he be for the 
present deprived of the latter for his faithfulness to your majesty's 
"crown, the same means whereby his uncle got both it and his 
honour. He hath served your majesty against the Irish rebellion 
since the beginning of it ; and when, through an almost general 
defection of the northern army, he was no longer able to serve your 
majesty there, he came, with much hazard, to take his share in the 
sufferings of your servants here, and with there to attend for that 
happy time, that, we trust, will put us in a condition to contribute 
more to your service than our prayers. If yourmajesty shall think 
fit to advance this gentleman to an earldom, I conceive that of 
Dunnegall, a county in the province of Ulster, wherein he should 
have a good inheritance, is fittest, which I humbly offer to your 
majesty's consideration, as a part of the duty of 

" Your majesty's, &c. 

" Ohmohd." 

The king, upon this representation, was pleased, by privy-seal, 
dated at Newcastle, Jan. 15, 1646, and by patent at Dublin, 
March 30, 1647, to create him Car) of Donnegal, with limitation of 
the honour to the issue male of his father, and the annual creation 
fee of 15/. sterling. In 1647, he waB one of the four hostages sent 
by the Marquis of Ortnond to the English parliament, as surety for 
his performance of the articles between them, for the delivery of 
Dublin, and the other garrisons, to their commissioners. 

After the restoration he was made captain of a troop of horse, 
and in 1662, one of the trustees for satisfaction of the personal 
arrears of the commissioned officers, for service in Ireland before 
June 5, 1649. June 25, 1661, he took his seat in the first parlia- 
ment after the restoration; was governor of Carrlckfergus ;" and in 
1668, established a mathematical lecture in the university of Dublin ;'■ 
but dying at Belfast, March 18, 1674, was buried at Carrickfergus, 
May 20, 1675, according to his request in his will, whereby he 
bequeathed to the poor of that parish 50/. and to those of Belfast 
200/. 

MURROCH O'BRIEN, first earl of Inchlquin ; 
a small head, inscribed, 1646, Hon. D. Mor. Bar. 



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228 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

Dinghitiquin. D. Prases. Prov. Momome, JEt. 3*>. 
hi Simon's " Medals," plate XV. 

Murroch O'Brien, the sixth baron of Inchiquin, was a nobleman 
of great spirit, and performed many brave actions for the service a' 
hit country, in the distracted time of the rebellion. At his accession 
to the honour he was in his minority, but had a special livery of bis 
lands, and taking early to arms, went into Italy, then the seat of 
war, to improve himself in that science ; where he served in the 
Spanish troops till his return to Ireland in 1639, in which year he 
took his seat in parliament, and was constituted vice-president of 
Minister, under Sir William St. Legcr, whom he accompanied 
•gainst tfie rebels in the county of Waterford, and with Colonel 
Jephson marched into Roche's country and Orrery ; relieved the 
castle of Rathgogan, and took Ballyha, with the slaughter of two 
hundred of the enemy. 

Having the command of a troop of English horse, he defeated 
a party of Irish in the barony of Fermoy ; and on Sir 'William 
St. Leger's death, the lord-lieutenant conferred on him the entire 
military command of Hunster, joining the Earl of Barrymore in 
commission with him, to manage the civil government ; upon whose 
decease be became solely vested with the civil command, and was of 
the privy-council to King Charles the First. 

In the latter end of the war, his forces being seduced by Crom- 
well's spies, revolted, whereby finding himself exposed to bis ene- 
mies, and his life in danger, he embarked with Lord Ormond, and 
landed at Perouse, in Bassa-Bretagne, in France ; from whence he 
went to Italy, and, returning to France, was made lieutenant-general 
by the French king of his army : after which he served in Spain and 
the Netherlands ; and being ordered to command the troops sent to 
assist the Portuguese on their revolt from Spain, he, with his eldest 
son, and all his family, were taken by an Algerine corsair, which 
occasioned the sending of Count Schomberg on that service, who 
extricated the King of Portugal from many troubles. 

Having ransomed himself and family, he retired into France, and 
surviving his own private troubles, and the confusions of the public, 
lived to see the restoration of Charles II. with whom he returned 
into England, and was rewarded by him, for his eminent services 
and sufferings, with the dignity and title of Inchiquin, and wa 



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OF ENGLAND. 229 

restored to bis estate by act of parliament in England; and in the 
Hot of explanation, the sum of 8000/. was ordered to be paid him out 
of die treasury, as a mark of his majesty's favourable end gracious 
consideration of his loyal service. 

His lordship by his will, dated Sept. 11,1673, directed his body 
to be buried in the cathedral church of Limerick, and after his 
youngest daughter Mary's portion of 3000/. should be paid, that bis 
eon should cause a handsome and decent monument to be buih 
over his grave. Lord Inchiquin died September the 9th, 1674, 
aged 58. 

HILDEBRAND, third and last lord Allington, 
of Killard, in Ireland. R. Wilkinson esc. Ato. 

This nobleman succeeded his nephew Giles, lord Allington, of 
Wimondley, in the county of Hertford, who died an infant of ten 
years old, in 1691 ; in whom the English Barony ceased, and the 
Irish honour devolved on his uncle Hildebrand, in whom, he dying 
without issue, the male line of the Allingtons and the title became 
extinct together. 

William, lord Allington, elder brother of Hildebrand, third and 
last lord of the family, left his estate, at that time the largest 
in Cambridgeshire, to his relict, till his children came of age, with 
a power of granting leases, in order to raise fortunes for his daugh- 
ters, and that then it should goto his heir male. The will, however, 
being improperly drawn up, the widow found she had a power of 
granting leases for any time ; and accordingly made a lease of the 
whole to Henry Bromley, afterwards lord Montfort, for 999 years: 
so that Hildebrand, lord Allington, uncle and heir male of Giles the 
last lord, could receive no benefit from the reversion, and sold his 
right to the said Mr. Bromley. An act of parliament, obtained 
some years since, enabled the late Lord Montford (or others for him) 
to dispose of this estate to pay incumbrances; a»d by virtue of 
the powers contained in this act, the noble seat of Horseheath 
Hall has been sold to strangers, and has been subsequently pulled 
down. 



WENTWORTH DILLON, earl of Roscommon. 
S. Harding, 1800. 



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230 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

Wentworth Dillon, son of James, the third earl of Roscommon, 
ie supposed to have been born in Ireland about the year 1633, 
during the government of that country by the Earl of Strafford, 
who, being both hia ancle and godfather, gave him his surname. 
At big seat in Yorkshire he was first instructed in Latin, in which 
he made considerable progress ; but when the prosecution com- 
menced against Lord Strafford, be was sent to Caen, in Normandy, 
by the advice of Archbishop Usher, who had converted his father 
from popery. At Caen he prosecuted his academical studies under 
the learned Bochart; and afterward travelled into Italy, where he 
examined with care the valuable remains of classical antiquity, and 
acquired uncommon skill in the knowledge of medals. Soon after 
the restoration, Lord Roscommon returned to England, and was 
made captain of the band of pensioners; but this preferment 
proved a misfortune, as it led him into extravagances which induced 
a passion for gaming. This impaired his fortune, involved him in 
quarrels, and made it prudent for him to retire to Ireland to look 
after his estate. On his return to England be was appointed 
master of the horse to the Dutchess of York, and married Frances, 
daughter of the Earl of Burlington. He now cultivated literature, 
and formed a plan of a literary society ; but the gout put a period 
to his life and his project in 1684. At the moment in which he 
expired, he repeated with the most fervent devotion two lines of 
his own version of Diet Ira. 



Lord Roscommon was the author of several poetic pieces, which 
possess considerable merit, but on which such high commendation) 
were bestowed in his own time, as he probably would not have 
obtained had he been of inferior rank. Fenton partially remarks, 
" In his writings we view the image of a mind that was naturally 
serious and solid, richly furnished, and adorned with all the orna- 
ments of art and science, and those ornaments unaffectedly dis- 
posed in the most regular and elegant order." From this account 
of the riches of his mind, says Dr. Johnson, who would not 
imagine that they had been displayed in large volumes and nn- 
merous performances? who would not be surprised that theysm 
not sufficient to form a single book, or to appear otherwise than 
in conjunction with the works of some other writer of the same 
petty size ! We must however allow of Roscommon, what ii '*T 



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OF ENGLAND. 231 

much to his honour, that he is the only correct writer in verse before 
Addison ; and that if there are not so many or so great beauties in 
his compositions as in those of some contemporaries, there are at 
least fewer faults. His versification is smooth, but rarely vigorous, 
and his thymes are remarkably exact. He improved taste if he did 
not enlarge knowledge, and may he numbered among the bene- 
factors to English literature. 



end o? VOL. 



Printed bj J. F. Dovm, St. Junn'i Squire. 

D,gil zed by GOOgle 



a i b ,. Google 



DIRECTIONS 



ft PLACING RICHARDSON'S COLLBCTION OF PORTRAITS IN CHANGER'S 
BIOORAPHICAX HISTORY OF ENGLAND. 



V Tht Nuitwroii ttau&for the Vol. and the Figurafar the Page. 

ABEL, Aid. and R. Kilvert, two raainc projectors for wine 

1641, iiii 248. 
Alabaster, Gail. Ml. sua LXVI. ii. 351. 
Albemarle, Christopher, duke of, iv. 156. 

, Anne, dutchess of, t. 355. 

Allen, Thomas, M. A. ii. 145. 

Alsop, George, v. 56. 

Archangel, Father ; inscribed, " Re verendtis Pater Archan- 

gelns," &c. ii. 82. 
Archee, jester to King Charles I.; inscribed, 

" This i* no Mackle Jobs Dor Summers Wilt, 
Bat here ii mirth drawn from the Mates quill.: 
Dimbt oat (kinds Reader), be but pleat'd to Tiew 
Tliaso wittj jests, the; are not onld bnt new." 

iii. 341. 
Armstrong, sir Thomas, executed 1684, t. 174. 
Arnndell, Thomas, earle of, ii. 274. 

, Alathea Talbot, conntess of, iii. 208. 

Ashmole, Elias, it. 55. 
Ay lett, Robert; inscribed, 

" Dies mei smtt nt Dtnbra inelinala, 

Conftinnpnlmufl uidos tanqnam ■ermonem." 

iii. 39. 
Ayscue, sir George, v. 158. 

vol. iv. 2 A 



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234 DIRECTIONS FOR PLACING 

Baukwbli., Edward, alderman of London, Obit. 1679, 

v. 184. 
Bacon, sir Nathaniel, I. 330. 
llalforv, sir William, iii. 109. 
Bancroft, the Kev. Richard, archbishop of Canterbury, 

ii. 43. 
lliiufl, John ; inscribed, " Johannes Banfi Hnniades Rivn- 

lonsis Ungarua olim," Stc. Gowy del. iii. 282. 
DurLloy, sir Robert, one of the justices of the King's 

Bench, iii. 19. 
Barkstead, John, regicide, executed at Tyburn, 1662, 

v. las. 

Baron, Robert; inscribed, 

" Vnllui App*llin«a |>ielu> Btrooe Utaellm Ml, 
Tolui Apolliuea [lingilur site liber." 

&t. sua 17. iii. 138. 

Beard, Thomas, schoolmaster to Oliver Cromwell; in- 
scribed, " Pedantius," ii. 375. 

Bedford, Lucy Harrington, countess of; inscribed, " No- 
bilissima 8c Prudent. Do. Lucia Harin. com. Bedfordite," 
ii, 171. 

Bell, Francis, a Jesuit; inscribed, " R. P. F. Franciscas 
Bel Conventus," &c. ii. 385. 

Benlowes, Edward, iv. 38. 

Bethel, Slingsby, esq. one of the sheriffs of London and 
Middlesex, anno 1680, v. 184. 

Blount, sir Henry, v. 275. 

Brady, Henry ; inscribed, " Adm. Rev. illustri clarissimoq. 
D.D. H. Brady, equiti," &c. v. 91. 

Brereton, sir William, major-gen. of Cheshire, Stafford- 
shire, and Lancashire, iii. 74. 

Bridgeman, Dr. John, bishop of Chester, 1628, ii. 168. 

Brog, sir William ; inscribed, " Heer Wilhelm Brog, Bid- 
der ende coronel general Vande Scotsche natie anno 
1635," iii. 81. 



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THE PORTRAITS. 235 

Brume, Richard ; inscribed, 

" Reader! la heere than oil! Iwo facei fiode, 

(Jdc ol the body, t'other of (be mitide; 

This by (he grayer an, that with macti strife, 

Wee think* Brome deud, bee's dnwne so In (ho life 

Tint b/i owne pen'* done to ingeinously 

That nbo read's it nail tbinke hee ne'er shall d;."— A. B. 

iii. 131. 
Browne, Richard, major-general of Oxon, Berkshire, and 
- Buckingham, iii. 71. 
Bra.cn, John, i. 303. 
Buckingham, George Villiers, duke of; from an extra rare 

print by Droeshout, ii. 23. 
Bullaker, John ; inscribed, " R. P. F. Joannes Baptists, 

alias Bullaker," &c. ii. 384. 
Bullen, or Bulleyn, initial letters W.B. i. 305. 
Bullingbrooke, Oliver St. John, earle of, Lord St. John of 

Bletso, ii. 299. 
Barton, William De Fald. com. Staff, anno Mt. sua 47, 

1623, ii. 147. 

Calender, the earle of, iii. 79. 

Calver, Mr. Edward, of Wilbie in the county of Suffolk*, 

iii. 106. 
Cameron, sir Ewen, chief of the clan Cameron, iv. 13. 
Carleton, George; inscribed, " Vera effigies R dl in Christo 

Patris Carleton Episc" 1 Cicestricn' 1 '," ii. 57. 
Cartwright, sir Hugh, chevalier Anglois, iv. 22. 
, William; inscribed, 

" Tims tli j left lmnd the mighty Slagyrile 

Snpporta, ilial then mightat alii«ld him n' h Hit light : 
Whose earlj aool ajni'il high Jet allwnies bil ; 
The Hharpe.i, cleanest, full square, leading wil ; 
The beat tjraes beat, could'at fartheat aonnest pierce. 
Of all tint walk in prose or dance in Terae ; 
Ti> Cartvrigbl in hit shadow'" ahadov dtrst, 



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236 DIRECTIONS FOR PLACING 

Carve, Thomas, Tipperariensis Notarins Apastolkas, v. 97. 
Castlehaven, Mervin, earl of, ii. 396. 

Cuwtou, Thomas; inscribed, "Si non nunc quando,"iii. 330. 

Chambers, Dr. anno Mt. sua 88, i. 173. 

Chapman, George, ii. 129. 

Child, sir Jonah, bart. vi. 133. 

Clifford, lady Anne, the only daughter and heir of George, 

earl of Cumberland, JEt. 13, 1603, ii. 176. 
Colerane, Constantia Lncy, lady, v. 401. 
College, Stephen ; inscribed, 

" Bj Iriab Mtha it mated liw I fall, 
A prej lo Rome, ■ mcrinoe la hell. 
Ml bleeding wnaOMa*, far juiiioe crjei ; 
Hou-e, heare, O Heaven, Tar nan mj mil denje*." 

vi. 8. 
Corbet, col. Miles, regicide, executed at Tyburn, 1662, 

v. 801. 
Cork, Richard Boyle, first earl of, ii. 337. 
Cornish, alderman, executed October 23, 1685, vi. 139. 
Coryate, Thomas ; inscribed, " Vera effigies Thomae Co- 

ryat," ii. 149. 
Codington, Francis, lord, ii. 273. 
Cotton, Charles, esq. v. 253. 
Crompton, Hugh, iv. 41. 
Cromwell, Elizabeth, wife of the Protector ; inscribed, 

" From feigned glory and usurped throne. 
And ill the greatoette to me faliclj shown, 
And from the arte of government let free, 
See Low Pretastreu and n Drudge agree." 

iii. 298 
Cumberland, George Clifford, earl of, armed for a tour- 
nament, i. 343. 
Curtins, sir William, vi. 36. 
Cutts, John, lord, iv. 119. 

Dan iiiL, Samuel, poet, ii. 128. 

Davies, John, writing-master of Hereford, ii. 165. 



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THE PORTRAITS. 237 

De la Mer, Henry Booth, lord, vi. 77. 

Denbigh, Basil Fielding, earl of, ii. 296. 

Denny, lord, i. 187. 

Derby, Charles, earl of, lord Stanley, &c. iv. 165. 

Desborough, major-general John, iii. 366. 

Devonshire, Edward Courtney, earl of, i. 190. 

Dingley, Robert ; inscribed, ** Vera effigies Roberti Din- 

glei in Artib. Magistri," iii. 336. 
Dixie, sir Wolstan, lord mayor, 1585, i. 300. 
Dod, John ; inscribed, 

" A grey* diiine ; precise, Dot tnrbnlent ; 
And nsTsr guillj oflhe nhnrchei rent. 
Meet Bitn lu linnar* ; rooul deront to Gad : 
Tliijs ia but part of Ibe die priiie or Dad." 

ii. 74. 

Dolben, John, archbishop of York, 1683, Ob. 1686, v. 13. 
Dorislaus, Dr. assassinated at the Hague, 1649, iii. 30. 
Dorset, Edward Sackville, earl of, ii, 285. 
Drayton, Michael ; inscribed, " Effigies Michaelis Dray- 
ton, armigeri poetic," ii. 127. 

Ellesmeee, Thomas Egerton, baron of ; inscribed, " Ho- 

noratiss D" Thomas Egertonus, Baro de Ellesmer," &c. 

ii. 90. 
Ellis, Edmund ; inscribed, " jEtatis suee 28, An" D' 1662 ;" 

arms, jive half-moons, v. 54. 
Elizabeth,' princess ; inscribed, " Serenissima Princeps 

Elisabetha, filia secunda Carol! Magn. Brit. Fran. & 

Hib. Regis." iii. 287. 
Essex, Robert Devereux, earl of, his excellency, &c. 

general of the army, iii. 59. 

, Margaret Elizabeth, countess of, iii. 212. 

Estienne, chevalier, seigneur des Vignau du Plessis, &c. 

i.93. 
Everard, Dr. Giles, iv. 3-1. 

J,gil zed by GOOgle 



238 DIRECTIONS FOR PLACING 

Fairfax, William; inscribed, 

" To Fi nnkenih.l -hen .eigcCrdo.. L»j«V. 

So w.i our Briliahe king-craft ot nkm d 
Bj Cundomer ■■ ia it Marlir-aude 

Thii honorable Cadet ; ud m iut'H 
Of all reomta ibml Bnrrongba Hmu tMiahi 
Our gloi Idqi Barroigb* m council 'd ts I— Itr.' 

ii. 100. 
Fairfax, Iho right honourable Ferdinand, lord, iii. 65. 
Fulconberg, lady, iv. 79. 
Falkland, the lady viscountess Lettice, iii. 236. 
Foil, John, bishop of Oxford, v. 19. 
Finch, Edward ; inscribed, " Ed. Finch his perambulations, 

and away for Hamersmilh," ii. 366. 
Flatman, Thomas, poet, v. 356. 

Gamble, John; inscribed, 

" Thii lo the |ra.rer owes. 



A inoit harmonium mind." jy 75, 

Garnet, Henry ; inscribed, " Si quid patimini propter jns- 
ti tiara boati petris Henricus Garnetus, Anglus e societafe 
Jcsu passus 3 May 1606," ii. SO. 

Goninges, or Jennings, Edmund; inscribed, 

" Edmuadi tpociera special nnicamque Geniagi 
Robora, rirtutem special el ills iidem. 
lusVH tcr DV™ fera LeX, fern neXVe bearVnt, 
Terq, omenta dies dena Deoembril erst. 
Namq tenet rnpluiu dntn cor A corpora liclor, 
Gregorij e citlia nnmina lingua petit ; 

Rotrarii lot jiguum proq 6deq Deo,'' 

i. 375. 
Goldsmith, Francis, poet, iv. 40. 
Gondamor, count ; inscribed, " Effigies eximij viri Dni 

Didaci Salinientide Acuna. comi tis de Gbndomare equitis 

nobti ordinis Calatravee," ii. 222. 
Goodwin, John ; windmill over his head, iii. 332. 



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THE PORTRAITS. 239 

G3 reatrakcs, Valentino, v. 232. 

Gruldeforde,sir Henry, i. 109. 

, lady, i. 148. 

G-ylcs, Henry; inscribed, " Glass painting for windows, 
as armes, sundyals, history, landskipt, fcc. Done by 
Henry Gyles of the city of York," vi. 145. 

Hall, Jacob, the famons rope-dancer, vi. 13. 
Hall, John, poet, Mtalis sua 19, 1646, iii. 158. 

, John ; inscribed, " I. H. anno fetalis suas 35," i. 308. 

Hariey, sir Robert, iii. 88. 
Harper, sir William, lord mayor, 1561, i. 301'. 
Harrison, John, esq. of Leedes, iii. 98. 
Harrington, James, iv. 60. 

■ -, sir John, translator of Ariosto, i. 313. 

Hartford, William Seymour, marquis of, ii. 289. 

HartgUl, George, i. 267. 

Harvey, Dr. William ; inscribed, " Galielmos Harveus," 

iii. 115. 
Heath, Henry; inscribed, " R. P. F. Paulus A. S. Mag- 

dalena alias Heath," &c. ii. 385. 
Herbert, Edward, lord, of Chierbery, ii. 318. 
Herrick, Robert, poet, iii. 136. 
Heydon, John ; inscribed, " Vera et viva effigies Johannis 

Heydon," &c. v. 303. 
Heywood, John, poet; inscribed, " I. H," i. 207. 
Hicks, William ; inscribed, 

" Thongh thon no prophet ait, nor prophet'a son, 
Without their spirit, this coald ne'er be done ; 
Though Brightmtn, Napeir, Mede, ire gone to rest, 
Their ip'rile jet Urea redoubled in thj breast . 
Yuo Dial We aasl th'Apooalypi (o ground, 
Beoiase su dark, mjaterioni, and profound. 
Whj tike it up Bgaiue, and use this glauc, 
Twill then no longer Tor a mjitrie peaie." 

iv. 46. 



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240 DIRECTIONS FOR PLACING 

Hill, Emery, esq. fonndcr of the almshouses in Tothili 

Fields, t. 194. 
Hobson, Tobias, the Cambridge carrier, iii. 343. 
Hoddesdon, John; inscribed, 



Yat ill'i 1m lilile, Hn u bat m«de lui 

Bj Hi' Panter** Petcil, ot Ibe Printer 1 ! Plmi." 

iv. 43. 

Holland, Philemon, iii. 118. 

, Henry Rich, earl of, ii. 298. 

, Hezekiah, minister of the gospel! at Sutton Va- 
lence in Kent, iii. 338. 

Hollis, sir Tretswell, v. 164. 

Hoskins, sir John, vi. 117. 

Hotham, sir John, governor of Hall, iii. 11. 

Hudson, Jeffery, queen Henrietta Maria's dwarf, iii. 345. 

Huntingdon, Elizabeth, countess of ; inscribed, " Vera 
effigies Dominaa Elizabethan nuper comitissse Hunting- 
don," iii. 210. 

Huntingdon, Henry Hastings, earl of, ii. 293. 

James, duke of York, ii. 254. 

Jefleries, sir George, lord chief-justice of England, v. 123. 

Jegon, John, Mt. 50, 1601. Ob. 1617, ii. 53. 

Jessy, Henry, ii. 373. 

Jollife, lady Mary, daughter to Ferdinando, late earl of 

Huntingdon, v. 371. 
Jordan, admiral sir Joseph, v. 161. 
Ireland, William, a Jesuit ; inscribed, " R. P. Gulielmos 

Irlandus societatis Jesu sacerdos," v. 94. 
Ireton, Thomas Sanders de, iv. 6. 



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TUB PORTRAITS. 241 

Kkblinq, Josiah, vi. 7. 
Kingston, Richard ; inscribed, 

" Dmbn lifi boiu hm ott inrgeulii id iltOB, 

Effigiem melira pigini onlt» dabii. 
IngsnlM uinw upiruil Tirlntlbni utn 
Vgiterrnaans, tu»m, Tel Titiane loam." 

v. 52. 
Koningsmark, Charles John, lord, vi. 40. 

Lamottii, John, esq. citizen of London, iii. 102. 
Langhom, Richard, executed 14th July, 1679, *. 129. 
Lant, Thomas ; inscribed, " God is my lot, God createth, 

Man immitateth, Yertu flourisbetb, Death finishcth ;" 

initia( letters T. L. i. 331. 
Lawson, sir John, slain 1665, t. 160. 
Lee, sir Thomas, mercer, i. 301. 
, William ; inscribed, " Effig. vera Goli. Lee Patris 

Iluius Progeniei, iEtatis sua? 89, An" 1632," iii. 104. 
Leland, John, a bust on a pedestal, in Refectorio Coll. 

Omn. Anim. Oxon, i. 126. 
Lenox, James Stuart, duke of, ii. 281. 
Ley, sir James, lord chief-justice of the King's Bench, 

ii. 95. 
Lister, sir Martin, knight, 1626, iii. 90. 
Lockyer, Nicholas; inscribed, " The true Effigies of the 

truly Religious, Learned, and Juditious Divine, etc. Ni- 
cholas Lockyer, til', of Arts," iii. 325. 
Lower, sir William, iv. 39. 
Lovelace, Richard, a bust on an urn, inscribed, " Lucasta 

Posthume Poems of R. L." iii. 132. 
Lumley, John, lord, 1609, ii. 37. 

Mackenzie, sir George, Ob. 1691, Mt. 55, v. 131. 
Manchester, Edward, lord Montague, baron of Kimnolton, 

viscount Mandevile, &c. ii. 273. 
vol. iv. 2i 



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DIRECTIONS FOR PLACING 



Maniot, the great eater ; inscribed, 

" Here to roar riev h i pmented the fr«t titer, 
Harriot Ihe lawyer, Grajea-luaei oraomt 
Who IW fcii gall ■ boooaae a meet cheater : 
Tfcoeo that arill feed Bin cc—c el l iball aol w 



Marsham, sir John, sFJ. stue 80, v. 269. 
Massingberd, Henry ; inscribed, 




TW Lord will perfect •■ which eoaoefnolh me, Paal. IS. 8." 

iv. 61. 

Massinger, Philip, poet, iii. 129, 

Matthews, Tobias, archiepiscopas Eboracensis, ii 82. 

Matoaka a)s. Rebccka, daughter to the mighty Prince 

Powhatan, emperor of Virginia, ii. 186. 
Hay, Thomas, esq. poet, iv. 36. 
Heldrum, sir John, iii 79. 
Mews, Dr. Peter, bishop of Winchester, 1684, Ob. 1707, 

JBi. 89, v. 6. 
Middlesex, Lionel Cranfield, earl of, ii. 297. 
Middleton, Thomas, poet ; inscribed, " Vera effigies Tho. 

Middleton, gent." iii. 132. 
Street, Thomas ; inscribed, " Thomas Street Miles, jus- 

ticiarius Communis Band, iE talis 63," vi. 117. 
Mill, Humphry ; inscribed, " The second part of the Night 

Search, with the projects of these times, in a poem by 

H. Mill," iii. 139. 
Mingh (or Minns), Christopher, admiral, 1666, v. 162. 
Moll Cut-purse ; inscribed, 

" See here the Preaidaas u'lh pilfring trade, 
Mcnsnrrea aeooid Venus'* onalj majd, 



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THE PORTRAITS. 



iii. 252. 

Monck, Nicholas, bishop of Hereford, 1660, Obit. 1661, 

^E(. 60, v. 8. 
Mordaunt, John, viscount ; inscribed, " L'Jllustrissimo Ca- 
valiero Giovanni Mordaunt d'Aviland, barone de Ry- 
gole,"&c. iii. 313. 
Moricc, sir William, knight, secretary of state to Charles 

II. v. 101. 
Mosly, sir Nich. cloth worker, lord mayor of the city of 

London 1599, i. 299. 
Mountaigne, George, archbishop of York 1628, ii. 49. 
Mowbray and Maltravers, Henry, baron of, ii. 314. 
Murcot, John ; inscribed, 

" Here ataud and live in thy immortal! page, 
Thou golden Preacher in an iron age ; 
Ireland lament! thy loste whose powerful! word, 
Wronglil mi her greater conquests then the sword ; 

But thou (blest oonqneror) didst win their hearts." 

iii. 338. 

Myddleton, sir Hugh, the original projector of the New 
River, which he brought from Ware, in Hertfordshire, to 
London, and by which be was ruined, ii. 103. 

Nalton, the true effigies of Mr. James, iii. 336. 

Neale, Thomas ; inscribed, "Vera effigies Thomas Nigelli, 

armigeri Warnefordiensis," iii. 161. 
Newcastle, William Cavendish, earl of, viscount Mansfield, 

lord Boulsover and Ogle, ii. 390. 

, Henry Cavendish, duke of, 1676, iv. 162. 

, Margaret, dutchess of, v. 261. 

J,gil zed by GOOgle 



244 DIRECTIONS FOR PLACING 

Newport, Mountjoy-Blount, earl of, lord Mountjoy of 

Thurveston, master of the ordinance, ii. 303. 
Northumberland, Henry Percy, earl of, 1619; inscribed, 

" If irl could abew the spirit in the fact, 
And in dud linn express a living; grace; 
Von might (Ihont* wanting an insciiption) •wear* 
Tbii (bin the ahadow of a Perej were : 
For when Hw noble Roman* worthies lir'd. 
Though greater fane their fortsies hare >tohei»'d ; 
No breier ipiritla did in Rome oommud, 
Then were the Poroj'i oF North uroberlaiid." 

ii. 31. 

Nott, sir Thomas, kn 1 , one of the gentlemen-ushers in ordi- 
nary of the hon"* privy chamber, to bis present Ma d * Ktag 
Charles the Second, v. 190. 

Oaths, Titns, standing in the pillory, vi. 167. 
Okey, col. J. executed at Tyburn 1662, iii. 74. 

, on horseback, iii. 74. 

Oldcastle, John, lord Cobbam, i. 50, 

Orange, the most illustrious and noble "William of Nassau, 

prince of, born 1627, and married 23 May 1641, iii. 264. 
-, the high borne princesse, Maryprincesse of Orange, 

etc. maried at Whitehall 23 May 1641, borne 4 Not. 

1631, ii. 257. 
OToole, Arthnrus Severas Nonesnch, jJEftriis 80. 

" Great Mognl'a landlord, of both Indies king. 
Waste asl f-admiiiiig fame doth lendlj ring, 
Writes fonraeore jeers, more kingdom; he bath right to, 
The atari aaj go, and for them he will fight too ! 
And though this worth!* as age mill not beliere bim, 
1st Blatter, (platter, riraider, acoff ta griate htm ; 
Yet he and all tbe world In Ulii agree. 
That anoh another Toole will never be." 

ii. 100. 

Overbnry, sir Thomas, writing his epitaph; inscribed, 

" Tnoie swan-like 'notes, sang 10 inapiredlj 
To thj uetimelj Mali, preia iboat ™o 



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THE PORTRAITS. 245 

Lion* draw ua from lib, and thj iwifc Trsg*die 

Shows I bat thine owns Soalen Propbecie In Ael. 

Thj Nunc and Vertoes lire, to kill Ifaj mould 

Wa» ail IiopriMDnetlt, and Pojson could, 

Bdt tbj more heirenl w Self from double aIihdm 

Sett tree (ul once) thy Bod j ind lha Tower 

In Lbal supreme nnpsrliull coarl remains, 

Wber oar Ambition, Envy, Lnit haie power, 

Redeem'd from poyaononB ptotti, from Witches ohaime. 

Pram Wenlon & tb' Apothecaries bums." 

ii. 128. 
Oxendon, sir Henry de Barbam ; inscribed, " Non est 

mortals quod opto 1647," v. 260. 
Oxford, the right honourable arid truly generous Robert 

Vecre, earl of, Lo. Bulbeck, Sandford, and Scales, being 

the 23d earle of that noble family since the Conquest. 

He was slayne at the seidge of Mastvict, anno 1633, 

and left issue two sons, ii. 291. 

PARIS, Matthew ; inscribed, " Mattbaei Parisiensis his- 
toric! (qni obijt 1259) vera effigies, ex libro ejus chroni- 
corom MS. olim sni ipsins, nunc regio desampla," i. 58. 

Parkinson, John, author of the Herbalist, iii. 155. 

Pastoii, lady, with coat of arms, a chevron betwixt three 
owls; motto, " De luevix ie pense mienlx." iv. 88. 

Pecke, Thomas ; inscribed, 

" Aonidcm jorenile deem doolasqae Thalia, 
Gloria Peckeidom delicieqaadoniDr; 
Pingittrr aOgul taut am bio. Bed riratimga 
Ilia ADimi iElsrao perpetaanda ittjln.'' 

iv. 44. 
Pembroke, Philip Herbert, earle of, and Montgomery, etc. 

lord cbamberlaine of his Ma"" most hon 1 "" hoashold, 

ii. 283. 
Pendrill, William, of Boscobell, ML 84, vi. 1. 
Pennington, the true portraiture of the right honourable 

Isaac, lord mayor of the city of London, iii. 92. 



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462 DIRECTIONS FOR PLACING 

Pennington, the true portrac ture of that famous and valliant 
sea cap* sir John, knight, one of the gentlemen in ordi- 
narie of his Ma"" privie chamber, governour and captaine 
of Sandowne Castle in Kent, and vice admirall of his 
Ma"" flcete for Ihis expedition, anno 1636 & 1637, iii.58. 

Perrott, sir John, deputy of Ireland 1584, i. 241. 

Percy, Thomas, principal in the Gunpowder Plot conspi- 
racy, 1605; inscribed, " Heec est vera & prima origi- 
nalis editio Thomas Perci," &c. ii. 190. 

Perwicb, Susanna ; 

" Hev'n all thai'* ten, Ruder, nnlimelr DeiiL 

H.ih snaiclit ths reel ; he needs would slop th« breath 
Of Ibis air meet harmonious Queene of Iotb, 
And bj her Kfeleiu pielon plainlj pro re 
Nor Goodness, Beauty, Breeding, finest peril 
Where >in i> fonnd, can abend from hi> fierce dirU, 
Bit wbat ih' Effigies ™ii, the Bcoke will tell 
Her innard Splendors, looke ud riow then well." 

iv.90. 
Peters, Hugh; windmill on his head and the devil on his 

shoulder, iii. 342. 
Pope Hadrianus IV. i. 55. 
Pope Johannes VIII. commonly known by the name of 

Pope Joan, i. 53. 
Pordage, John ; inscribed, " Effigies Johannis Pordage, 

philosophi, medici, theologi, authoris hujus figures biero- 

gliphicas," iii. 344. 
Poyntz, major-generall, iii. 71. 
Prideaux, the right reverend father in God John, late B' 

of Worcester, ii. 339. 
Purchas, Samuel; inscribed, " Anag. Samuel Purcbas, 

pars sua celum," ii. 68. 

Rainbow, Edward ; 

" His face job see, but not Lis noble mind. 
That Ukahii time wm great and unconfin'd. 



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THE PORTRAITS. 247 

Yet humble too, and honour* would present; 
Bat's virluts built tho greiial monument : 
Which ill de.ouriog lima cannot deface 
Till ib«vforld.wanta bolt, gratitude and grace." 

r.U. 

Ramsey, lady Mary, wife of sir Thomas Ramsey, a great 
benefactress to Christ church Hospital, i. 337. 

Richards, Nathaniel ; inscribed, " Vera ac viva effigies 
Nathanaelis Richards, gen :" motto, " Despice mundum 
respice finem, senile supera non terrestria, suspice 
caelnm," 8tc. iii. 130. 

Richardson, John, O. D. bishop of Ardagh, aged 74, An° 
D- 1653, iii. 318. 

Ricraft, Josiah ; inscribed, 

" Of ill the gflifti of Cod's roost sacred Spirit 

The goill of tongues being of much precioni merit, 

Bi which man tnainlj differ* from ■ beaut, 

And all rare knowledge riclilj i» increast ; 

How mocb to our industrious Ricraft (hen, 

la doe, for his great paines and uaefnll pen ; 

Who thai bsth made >o copious » oolleotion 

Of th' Orient Characters, for fair direction 

To learn those tongues. A wnrkmnat excellent, 

And of more worth than pearles moat Orient, 

For which, with grateful heart giro God the praise. 

And crown brave RiuafL'i browea n" fragrant bejel." 

iii. 149. 
Ridley, Mark ; inscribed, 

" Minus ab Bisa, Rutbenais, quinqne per annoa, 

Anglis ni deiii, to Vocal ilia domnm; 

Tute Mathematics elarua roagnelica dies, 

Psconiat 1 nodes ductus ubique capis." 

i. 307. 
Roe, sir William, ironmonger, lord mayor of the city of 

London, 1592, i. 299. 
Rossetti, cardinal, iii. 270. 
Rous, Francis ; inscribed, 

" Adam (be first this image clajmee aa hit 
Within the second Adam's image la ; 



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248 DIRECTIONS FOR PLACING 

TWt fa «• Ufa fan. Ml hh bj tfcaa, 

RM CM it MM, Mi ft Ml bn writ lee." 

iv. 47. 

Rndyerd, sir Benjamin, surveyor of his Ma"" court of wards 
and liveries, iii. 106. 

Rnnmip, Eliuour, the famous ale-wife of England ; in- 
scribed, 



two. 

Rupert, the illustrious and high-borne prince, count pala- 
tioe of y Rhine, fee. knight of the most noble order of 
the garter, and generall of the horse to his Ma"* King 
Charles, anno 1643, ii. 157. 

Rutland, the right honorabell Francis Manners, earle of, 
baron Ross of Hamlake Belvoire, and Trusbutt, and 
knight of the honorable order of the garter, ii. 30. 

Ryder, sir William, haberdasher, lord mayor of the city of 
London 1600, i. 299. 

Salisbury, William Cecil, earle of, &c. knight of the 
garter, ii. 294. 

Saltonston, sir Richard, lord mayor of the city of London 
1597, i. 299. 

Sedgewick, the Rev. Obadiah, iii. 337. 

Sey and Seale, William Fines, viscount and lord, ii. 312. 

Shirley, sir Robert, ambassador from the Persian court to 
Pope Paul V. by whom he was treated with great dis- 
tinction, ii. 88. 

Sliiriaeus, James, a poet ; a bust on a pedestal, inscribed, 
" Jacobus Shirlasns," G. Phenik pinx. iii. 129. 

Skelton,John, poet laureai to King Henry the Eighth, i. ISO- 

Skippon, Phillip, esq. major-generall of the army, &c 
iii. 69. 

Slater, the true portraiture of the I earned Mr. William, D-D. 



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THE PORTRAITS. 249 

Smith, the honourable sir Thomas, knight, late embassador 
from his Ma"* to y great empcrour of Rossie, go vernour of 
the hon 1 "* and famous societies of marchants tradinge to 
y East Indies, Muscovy, the French and Somer islands, 
company treasurer for Virginia, etc. ii. 64. 

, captayne John, admiral! of New England; in- 
scribed, 

" Theee its tbe linei thai ntaew Ihj face ; but tlioic 

Thai shew Ihj grace und glorj brighter bee : 
Thj fain iliicov erica and bwle-orerthrowea. 

Of ul*agei, much civilliz'd bj tboc. 
Beat abew lb v spirit, and to it glorj wjn ; 
So thou art bream withoni, but golds within." 

ii. 102. 
Somerset, the lively portraict of the lady Frances, countesse 

of, ii, 173. 
Sommers, Will, kinge Heneryes jester ; inscribed, 

" What thoogL (boa think'*! mee clad in alrange attire, 
Knowa 1 am anted to mineownedeaire. 
And jet the chareolera deaorib'd upon mee 
Mbj ahewe thee tbat n king bealow'd them on me. 
Tbii borne I have betoken* Sommer'a mime. 
Which sportive lime wilt bid thee reade mv name ; 
AU with mj nature well agreeing too, 
Aa both tbe name, and tjme, and habit doe." 

i. 149. 

Southampton, the right honourable and most noble Henry 
Wriothsley, earle of, baron of Titchfield, knight of the 
most nob. ord. of y* garter, ii. 30. 

Standford, Henry Gray, earl of, lord Gray of Groby, Bon- 
vile, and Harington, Sec. ii. 302. 

Stapleton, Thomas; inscribed, " Thomas Stapletonus, 
Anglus, aetat. anno LXIII," i. 271. 

Sterling, William Alexander, earl of; inscribed, " Vera 
effigies Gulielmi comit. dc Sterlin, astatis sun LVII," 
iii. 142. 

VOL. iv. 2* 



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250 DIRECTIONS FOR PLACING 

Stewart, the picture of the moat noble and learned ladye 

ArbeUa, &c. ii. 187. 
•Stevenson, Matthew; 

■• Tto prialer'i proSl not ■/ pride, 
Halk Oil idea aigaiTj'd; 
Far be paibt eat (ba ■wrie paj, 
Aad Mr. Gajwood Made it gaj." 

v. 258. 
Stokes, William, a vaulting-master; inscribed, 

'• IagMuoa libi titm mu edidii ombnoi 

Sad lu note tfili, Iwta Tcitiginii arte 

Bxteaplo apadaia te par alrnaq ralai. 
Corpora aab klo uibi Spirilu cite vidcru, 

Aal aorpei ohjauea apiritaaJe aunu. 
NaUaai aealit nmno li a tear uapigcr, oaues 

Penelitai porta*, aeo aorapoDdm btbet." — T. S. 

iii. 187. 
Strode, sir George, iv, 49. 

Symonds, the ponrtraiture of Mr. Joseph, late vice provost 
of Eaton Coilcdge, Mt. sum 50, iii. 340. 

Talbot, sir Gilbert, 1516, i. 70. 
Tatham, John, poet; 

" H«n ii bm •cbitan, the jadgtag ejc nuij tee 
la tittiy Uav a perfect haraoaj i 
Aad lave ud boast j for to (teat a |noa 
Jo; in taair* loielj Raaaasilar'i hoe." 

it. 43. 

Taylor, John, the water poet, ii. 134. 
Temple, Susanna, the only daughter of Sir Alexander Tem- 
ple, knight, lady Thornhurst, lady Lister, iii. 338. 

, sir Peter, kn', iv. 22. 

—■■—■■, the lady Elinor, 

" Her oiact'at portraiture aeareat the Sfe, 
Ii Vartaea pelt one, Mlher, eujil, aad wife. 
When hsu bar glorias* ohaneter to best, 
Tail Hfaaag Tnm of Ik* Hol» Chad." 



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THE PORTRAITS. 251 

Totues, George Carew, earl of, ii. 300. 
Ubchabd, or TJrqubart, sir Thomas, knight. 

" Of bin wlioie ihtpa this picture b*lh dcsign'd, 
Vwtue tnd learning represent the mind." — W. S. 

iii. 160. 
Urselin, Barbara, bom at Augsbury, wife to Michael Van- 
beck. " Vanbeck married this frightful creature on pur- 
pose to carry her about for a show." iv. 08. 

Vandun, Cornelius, born at Breda, soldier with King 
Henry at Tournay, yeoman of the guard, and usher to 
Kings Henry and Edward, Queen Mary, and Queen 
Elizabeth, Obiit 1577, &tatis sua 94, i. 303. 

Venner, Dr. Tobias, anno 1660, JEtatis sua 85, iv. 33. 

Vere, sir Francis, i. 288. 

Wadd, or Waad, sir William ; inscribed, *' The lively por- 
traitnre of the worthy knight, sir William Wadd, lieute- 
nant of the Tower," &c. ii. 108. 

Waller, sir William, knight, sargeant major generall of y 
parliaments army, and one of the members of y e bono 1 "* 
House of Commons, 1643, iii. 66. 

Wallingford, the righte honourable William Koollis, vis- 
count, baron of Grayes, M r of the court of wardes, and 
one of bis Ma** most hon u * pri vie counsell, and knight 
of the garter, ii. 35. 

Walton, Brian, bishop of Chester, 1660, editor of the Poly- 
glot Bible, iii. 319. 

Warwick, Elizabeth, countess of; inscribed, " Elisabet co- 
mitissa Warwyck," iii. 218. 

1 , the right honourable Robert, earl of, baron of 

Leeze, &c: lord high admiral of England, one of his 
Majesty's most honourable privy council, and his Ma- 



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252 DIRECTIONS FOR PLACING 

jesty's lieutenant of the counties of Norfolk, Essex, &c. 

ii.2S0. 
Warwick, and Holland, the right hou"* Edward Rich, earl 

of, iT. 170. 
Weaver, captain Thomas ; inscribed, "T. W." 

" On tjrs maj here ■ double beaaij find ; 

Hii be* ifcn tkawM, hii book pmsiti bit mind. 

Which * few dawsej minotea hare improt'd. 

To >noh >ul lonnei of worth, M nukea bim lor'd ; 



in. iyy. 
Wclby, M r . Henry, G', MUdis sum 84. 

" Arthia jitldj a pfceuis, u>d but one, 

England, ihii phenix, ud beajdea bin not*, 
To aolilarj denrt* bomb ret JCT, 
Not minding what the world doth moat admire. 
Hii fane, Ihoogl. it waa moch deajr'd bj »uj. 
Id Ibrtj foore jearea wu ml Men bj noj : 
She, in ipje'd Aauea, in fercent nenle he djea. 
And boatb in tjme, new pheniiei shall tyae." 

Epitaph, Obijt die 29 Octobris, 1636, iii. 102. 
Wentworth, Darcy, sF.tath sua 32, 1624 ; inscribed, 

" Lex regit el boatea contra dncia ansa tnelnr 
Hinc popnlnm, legis qui aacra jnisafacit." 

ii. 109. 



-, Henrietta Maria, lady, vi. 158. 



Westmorland, Mildmay Fane, earl of, lord le de Spencer 

and Barghwasb, ii. 299. 
Westpbaling, Herbert, bishop of Hereford, 1585, i. 256. 
Wharton, Philip, lord Wharton of Wharton, ii. 315. 
Whitelock, Bnlstrode; 

" To limine tfaj merit" ud beroiok meadea. 
Illustrious Whitlock, i. a leak that needea 
A uobler draoght, for who darea bo so bold 
To out in braise, what >bold be gra.'d in gold ; 
Or with one poor hexaatick raise j« oolnmnei 
Of hia Tilt merit which deaeTTelh toId racs." 



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THE PORTRAITS. 253 

"Whyte, Richard; inscribed, "Ricardus Vitus Basinstocliius 
comes Palatimis." 

" VWe Ricarde din, rebnemajoTibnaorta 

Vile Brilannoram Titt, valeqae din ; 
Vile Britannoi urn, quid nim ? niii jure Toceria 

Tiiere qojppe fuels raortna grata Tirnm ; 
Mortne na (atrU (quoru tmenor eilitit JUtaa 

Omuis) el antiqno aemiaepalla r i(n." 

i.272. 
"Wight, John ; initials J. W. ; inscribed, 

" Weloom the Wight 
That bringetli each light." 

1.333. 

Wildman, major John ; motto, " Nil Admirari," iv. 6. 
"Willan, Leonard, a bust on a pedestal; inscribed, 

" Gloriona insariplious (arts ornaments) wajt. 
Troth to disguise, onelj on proip'rooa Fate ; 
SuoL trainei from fanning, mercenary wittl, 
Hii fortune or bin temper not befilti ; 
No judge pneposeat ; if appror'd hia fame. 
Shall wante no other morcnmen t hnt hia name." 

Leo Willan ipse scripsit, iv. 48. 
Winchester, John Pawlet, marqnisse of, earle of Wiltshire, 

and lord St. John of Basing, ii. 288. 
Winstanley, William, JBt. 39, 1667. 

" Let others drinke of Nectar, boast or Bajea ; 
The juice 'nth grape, and barley we (till prayae; 
For from tb' •fleet* of their all-oonqn'ring juice 
Proceed the fanoy'a of oar aparkling Muae. 
Bootes of (heae names and nature we despise 
As being lill'd with map; foolery's; 
Them, and the wortd'a choice treasures we doe grace 
With a foot'* cap as b'ing the fittest place." 

v. 270. 
Wither, George, poet; 

» What I wai ia passed by : 
Wbatlamaweydolliflie: 
Wbatlahallbanooedoaee, 
Vet in thai roy beanlies bee." jjj. 137. 



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S164 DIRECTIONS FOR PLACING 

Woodeocke, Martin, a Catholic priest, executed at Lan- 
caster, 1646. Latin line, " Eamos et no» at raoriamuz 
cum eo ; Joan 11. 16." ii. 886. 

Worcester, Henery Somerset, earle of, ii. 393. 

Wortley, the true and lively portraiture of that learned and 
valiant k', sir Francis of Wortlcy in the county of Yorke, 
k* and baronet, deceased, prisoner in the Tower of Lon- 
don 1653, iii. 136. 

Wren, Matthew, D. D. successively bishop of Hereford, 
Norwich, and Ely, died April 34* 1667, in his 83 d year, 
ii. 338. 

Young, John; inscribed, "P. Joannes Yongus, Hibernus, 
Societ. Jesu, Obijt Rome die 13 July 1664, ^Etat 75," 
v. 92. 

York, Ann Hyde, dutchess of, iv. 137. 



ADDITIONS 



TO RICHARDSON'S COLLECTION OF ENGRAVED BRITISH PORTRAITS. 

BALFORE, sir William, etc fac simile, from the scarce 
print, in RicraJVs "Survey of EnglancFs Champions," iii. 
109. 

Brereton, sir William, major gen. of Cheshire, Staffordshire, 
and Lankashire, from do. iii. 74. 

Brooke, the right hon u ° Robert, lord, &c. was shot at Lich- 
field, from do. ii. 316. 

Browne, Richard, Essq r , generall of Oxon, Berkshire, and 
Buckingham, from do. iii. 71. 



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THE PORTRAITS. 265 

Burton, Robert, _ author of " Hie Anatomy of Melancholy," 
ii. 70. 

Calender, the right honourable the earle of, etc. from 
Ricraft, iii.79. 

CJey pole, M". Elizabeth, the favourite daughter of Oliver 
Cromwell, iv. 82. 

Cromwell, Robert, Esq. father of the Protector, dud 1617, 
ii. 115. 

, the religious, successful, and truly valliant lieu- 
tenant general], from Ricraft, iii. 64. 

, Richard, Protector of England, Scotland, and 

the dominions and territoryes thereunto belonging, iii. 
300. 

— ; , Henry, lord deputy of Ireland, iii. 302. ■ 

Denbigh, Basil Fielding, earle of, &c. from Ricraft, ii. 



Essex, Robert, earle of, his excellence lord generall of 
the parli""* army, etc. lately deceased, from Ricraft, iii. 
59. 

Fairfax, the most noble Ferdinand, lord, generall- of the 

Northern conntyes; from do. iii. 65. 
, the most excellent sir Thomas, captin, generall 

of the armyes, etc. from do. iii. 62. 

Lasley, his excellence Alexander, generall of the Scotch 
army ; from do. iii. 77. 

Manchester, the right hon" 1 * Edward, earle of, &c. ma- 
jor generall of the Association; from do. iii. 68. 
Markham, Gervase, iii. 161. 



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256 DIRECTIONS, &c. 

Massey, Edward, Esq', major general! of the West ; from 

Ricraft, iii. 70. 
Mcldrum, sir John ; from do. iii. 79. 

Poyntz, major generall; from do. iii. 71. 

Ricraft, Josiah ; from his " Book of Alphabets," iii. 149. 
Roberts, the right honourable the lord, from Ricraft, iii. 
73. 

Skipfon, Phillip, Esq', major generall of the army, &c. 
from Ricraft, iii. 69. 

Standford, Henry Gray, earle of, lord Gray of Groby, Bon- 
vile, 8cc. from Ricraft, ii. 303. 

Verb, sir Horace ; from a scarce print by Faithome, ii. 99. 

Walx.br, sir William, major gen. of Surry, Sussex, and 

Hampshire ; from Ricraft, iii. 66. 
Warwick, the right hon b,c Robert, earle of, lord Rich of 

Leeze, and lord high admiral of the seas; from do. 

ii. 208. 
Willooghby, the right honourable the lord of, Parham, &c. 

from do. iii. 73. 



%* Thereuonfbc inserting the liil of Portrait* in tbiirolune ill, topniwtlbe 
ouofniion thai might (rite, from its being niitaieu. ai put of the General Index •< 
ll»mdofVol.VI. 



END OF VOL. IV 



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